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    • CommentAuthorwes m.
    • CommentTimeNov 5th 2009
     
    Its primarily flat with a few rollers, headwind out, tailwind back.
    • CommentAuthoreaglerock
    • CommentTimeNov 5th 2009
     
    Posted By: ecoovertThat's a real good speed for that distance.

    Okay, I thought you were claiming 112 miles in 5 hours on a fixed-gear, which pegged my BS-ometer. But I see that the Cannondale is a single-speed: Still unlikely, but less unlikely.

    Seriously, folks; how are you all getting these speed numbers? I ride a bunch (see above), mostly on city streets, and just doing the elapsed time ÷ mileage calculation rarely gets me to better than 15MPH. All you all riding with computers? Do they all pause when you're stopped at obstructions (stop signs, lights, traffic jams)?
    • CommentAuthorwes m.
    • CommentTimeNov 5th 2009
     
    My old computer paused when I stopped. My new one doesnt. A lot of people need a reality check like that.
    • CommentAuthorecoovert
    • CommentTimeNov 5th 2009
     
    Posted By: eaglerock
    Posted By: ecoovertThat's a real good speed for that distance.

    Okay, I thought you were claiming 112 miles in 5 hours on a fixed-gear, which pegged my BS-ometer. But I see that the Cannondale is a single-speed: Still unlikely, but less unlikely.

    Seriously, folks; how are you all getting these speed numbers? I ride a bunch (see above), mostly on city streets, and just doing the elapsed time ÷ mileage calculation rarely gets me to better than 15MPH. All you all riding with computers? Do they all pause when you're stopped at obstructions (stop signs, lights, traffic jams)?


    Riding in the city makes it hard if not impossible for you to hold a consistant speed long enough to stay in your zone. Also when you have to stop and start a lot that will slow you down a lot. Sounds to me like you may just need to ride outside of the city more often. If you can average 15mph. in the city you should be able to average up to 18 mph. on open rodes. Keep in mind that even an 18 mph. average pace on a solo ride is pretty good. If you want to do better than that you will have to go on longer rides or trow in some zone 4 training rides. That would be at between 80% and 90% of your max. heart rate. When I do zone 4 rides I tray to stay as close to 85% as I can. This number will go up in hills and drop on descents or on the flat. These rides should be shorter rides to start with but as you get better you will be able to hold this pace for longer. You may also try 5 or 10 minutes in zone 4 followed with 5 or 10 minutes in zone 2 and alternate between the two. Riding in zone 2 will allow you to recover and you will be able to ride harder while you are in zone 4. I do something simitar for climbing. As you become more fit you can lower the amount of time you spend in zone 2 and increase the amount of time you spend in zone 4 until you can ride at 80% to 90% of your max. for quite a while. My resting heart rate is 43 bpm. and my max is 200. On most of my longer rides I average about 165 bpm. At times I will kick it up a notch to an average of about 175 bpm. on my shorter 65 mile rides. I try to do this once a week. If speed is your primary goal you may want to do this two times per week. I would follow my high intencity ride days with at least one endurance ride or a longer ride in zone 3. Remember you can't demand more from your body than it is capable of. That's why zone training works so well as it gives your body a chance to recover so your high intencity rides will benefit you rather than weaken you.
    • CommentAuthorecoovert
    • CommentTimeNov 5th 2009
     
    Posted By: wes m.Its primarily flat with a few rollers, headwind out, tailwind back.


    That's impressive.
    • CommentAuthorcyciumx
    • CommentTimeNov 5th 2009 edited
     
    My reality check is pretty flawless.... I physically time myself. Meaning I leave my garage @ 7:10AM and I get to the city (10st. Costco) around 10ish and get back to my garage @ 12:24pm I google map the mileage and do some fancy calculations with the time and voila! My average miles per hour without the magic of a cyclo-'puter.

    My actual cateye double wireless says my average speed is 19.1 mph, but it doesnt turn off when I'm walking my bike (3.2 mph) or just coasting since I see a red light and find no need to keep pedaling....

    About the speeds in a city...most of my commute in the wee morning (3am) is with me and a few drunk drivers trying to creep home... I run some red lights and stop signs here and there because I can see in both directions if anyone is coming or not. and my 2nd stretch to my 2nd job at 9am is through an industrial zone near the San Jose airport.... lotsa cars, but generally simple straight roads with 45mph speed limits so lights aren't an issue. Coming home is the bad part... lots of lights, cars and idiots (me included), but i've been doing the same thing almost all year so I time the lights pretty good and rarely have to completely stop.

    ...These also aren't easy little jaunts. I expend a lot of energy. I'm usually in my 70-80% heart rate max range and if the opportunity presents itself I'll go all out and burn myself.... then you might see me crawl along at 14 for a few blocks before returning to normal.

    ...AND... if you never heard of the race RAAM then you'll see how insane speed numbers can be over distance.

    Here's the record for a SINGLE speed: Solo Single Speed | John Spurgeon | 2007 | 10.49 | 12:02:11 | 3042
    That's an average of 10.49 mph for 3,042 miles.... 26mph for less than 20 miles is do-able by someone who isn't a pro and not on a fixed.

    The record for a 2 person FIXED (The switch off, which means they each do about half the miles):2-Person Fixed | Gran Fondo Fixies | 2008 | 15.35 | 8:04:21 | 3014
    We can pretend that means 15 mph for 1,500 miles on a fixie! Insane! Coast to coast with no coast!
  1.  
    You might want to check out Map My Ride. It does all sorts of cool calculations.
    • CommentAuthorwes m.
    • CommentTimeNov 6th 2009
     
    Can any of you get map my ride to work? I dont know if it sucks completely or if my area is mapped poorly. Every time I try to map a ride it takes me off the street I want to be on and sends me on an adventure through 50 side streets. Then I have to take it off the auto route thing and just click on every corner. That gives me messed up distances because the route wont follow the road exactly.

    The lies map my ride and google were giving me inspired me to buy a new bike computer. It turns out a couple of my century rides were only 97 miles. LAME! Who the hell wants to ride 97 miles? Once you are that close you want an even 100.
  2.  
    Yeah, it doesn't know about bike paths and often gets rural roads wrong. Such is the nature of Google Maps, I'm afraid.
    • CommentAuthorthe rabbi
    • CommentTimeNov 7th 2009
     
    i use bikely.com
    • CommentAuthorLyKqiD
    • CommentTimeNov 7th 2009 edited
     
    Posted By: the rabbii use bikely.com

    Bikely is great.

    Has anyone heard of the iphone app that willl map your route and do a number of calculations?
    • CommentAuthoreaglerock
    • CommentTimeNov 7th 2009
     
    Posted By: LyKqiD
    Bikely is a great.

    Has anyone heard of the iphone app that willl map your route and do a number of calculations?

    MapMyRide has a free iPhone app; as I am iPhoneless, I haven't looked into the details of what the app does.
    • CommentAuthorSkidMark
    • CommentTimeNov 7th 2009 edited
     
    Bikely and mapmyride are similar, and they are both PITAs to use. It took me an evening of yelling at my computer to get it to work. I don't know what the deal is, it seems like if it is a US route or a freeway entrance or something it will try to reroute around it and send you on some wild fucking goose chase. About the only thing you can do it zoom in and follow the shoulder of the road as closely at possible. I mapped my route from Santa Barbara to San Luis Obispo on it and various other little route around San Diego and Portland, OR. I like it because it gives you the slope % and grade elevations. The only issue is that if you have a long distance ride it averages the grade changes. Say you have a 4 mile climb on a 50 mile trip and it says the climb is a 6% grade. If you map just the climb itself you might find out that it starts at 2% and then goes to 8% in the middle!
    • CommentAuthorthe rabbi
    • CommentTimeNov 8th 2009
     
    I did the MS150: Gambler's Classic this weekend. Total of 164 miles. Day 1 was 95 miles an I averaged 19.3mph (without my stops) with some really good hills on a 49/17. I flipped the weel to ss on the last 11 miles for the nice downhill into Mesquite. Today was 19.7mph over 69 miles (again, witout my stops). Had a blast, but my knees are feeling it now for sure.
  3.  
    Hm. Bikely seems a touch less fussy.
 
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