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  1.  
    I am in the market for a new bike, everyone! I have far too many track bikes and street fixed gears, and I need a change of pace. I recently had a baby girl (if you're reading this, Freya, GO TO BED) and in a few months, she will be old enough to be towed in a trailer behind the bike. At first, I wanted to buy a Surly 1x1 and slowly build it up. Then I found out, through the shop I work at, that I could get a screaming deal on a Specialized Crave SL 29er, and I did some math, and it'd be cheaper to buy the Crave and swap all the parts to the 1x1 frame. Then I saw the new Surly Karate Monkey SS with the Modular Dropout System, and really fell in love. That being said, I have a constant soft spot for the All City Nature Boy, of which I can also get a great deal on through the shop. I don't mountain bike, but I do tons of commuting (20 miles each way, have done it for 9ish years) and worry a 29er SS would be super fun for short jaunts with the family but wouldn't come out as often as, say, an SSCX build. For reference, I live in South Florida, the biggest climb is 100 ft elevation over 3/4 mile. Help a brother out!
    • CommentAuthorMancha150
    • CommentTimeSep 21st 2015
     
    Awesome steven, congratulations on the baby. I can vouch for the burley bee if you haven't picked up a trailer yet (works for all bikes, comfortable, hold a lot of snacks). Up until we got one, we had our son in the ergo baby baby bjorn, which we were told was not illegal as long as the baby wore a helmet. He seemed to enjoy it. I would say defintely get at least 32c tires. Are you definitely going single speed?
  2.  
    Yes, I believe so. I work on so many customers' bikes that I love the simplicity of SS.
  3.  
    I'm with you, I don't feel a 29er would be fun to commute on. I also agree with Jona on a 32c tire minimum.
  4.  
    I have been rolling on 32 and 35c Paselas for my commute the last few months. Mustache bars, front and rear brakes, front rack, freewheel. Makes a world of difference!
  5.  
    Sounds like a great setup! Big tires and a rack/basket/bag are the best thing one can do to better their commute. I've always admired the Nature Boy, not sure one can go wrong there.
    • CommentAuthoreaglerock
    • CommentTimeJan 20th 2016 edited
     
    Posted By: stevenwilliamsenFor reference, I live in South Florida, the biggest climb is 100 ft elevation over 3/4 mile.

    Posted By: stevenwilliamsenYes, I believe so. I work on so many customers' bikes that I love the simplicity of SS.


    At the risk of opening up a can of ideological worms, these two points may have a direct connection.

    I live in an area with a shit-ton of hills (SF Bay Area), but I'm basically a flatlander, riding around on the near-level land (0-150 feet) immediately surrounding the bay. For many years, my only bike was a 1993 Marin Bobcat Trail rigid steel mountain bike with a cheapie Shimano crankset (riveted chainrings!). My riding practice was to fiddle around with the shifters until I got into a gear that didn't kill me and didn't skip too much. I'd then ride that gear single-speed until it started skipping, then I'd goose it into a different gear and repeat. When I finally decommissioned the bike after about 20K miles and hauled it down to the bike kitchen for donation, I discovered that I'd ripped several teeth off the chainrings. Hunh.

    Single-speed's great, unless it isn't. If you're carrying a load (an ungenerous term for your kid, but there may be trips where the kid is replaced by groceries), having additional gearing options might be helpful. If this is still an open issue, perhaps a White Industries DOS 2-speed freewheel (16/18, 17/19, 10/22) would work, or maybe a flip-flop wheel with two differently geared freewheels.

    Web 2.0 editorial complaint: White Industries has redone their website recently, presumably by some buzzword-prattling shiny tech industry hipsters. Now they've got some kind of dynamic content management system, which doesn't allow you too bookmark individual product pages. Thanks a lot, hipster dooshbags!

    Posted By: vqstaphbeardI'm with you, I don't feel a 29er would be fun to commute on. I also agree with Jona on a 32c tire minimum.


    When one considers the growing availability of superwide 700c road tires (various Schwalbe Marathons, and a huge catalog of Panaracer-made tires: Rivendell Jack Browns, Grand Bois Cypress, Compass Stampede Pass/Bon Jon Pass/Barlow Pass, SOMA C-Line, New XPress, Shikoro and Supple Vitesse, among others). what's the real dividing line between wide 700c and 29er these days? Is it actually tire diameter, or just the absence/presence of knobby tires?
  6.  
    If I understood the issue correctly, it is indeed only the tire diameter:

    Both are ISO 622mm, and CX tires are 32-38mm. Wheels with fatter tires than 38mm, similar to those of a mountainbike, however, are referred to -as it seems mainly by marketing hipster dooshbags- as '29ers'.

    Personally, I prefer 25/28mm tires. Yes, for commuting, unless you are doing CX, 32mm could make sense.
  7.  
    Right, indeed 700c and 29er are both 622 mm, and I'm more than tired of all these marketing variations on wheel size. I suppose what I was stating is I wouldn't want to commute on a knobby tired MTB.
 
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