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    • CommentAuthorlewis 123
    • CommentTimeApr 23rd 2009
     
    ive had some close calls lately so now im looking to get one

    any suggestions on what brands and models to look in too would be appreciated
    • CommentAuthorthe rabbi
    • CommentTimeApr 23rd 2009
     
    giro atmos. i've seen them for really decent prices lately.
    if you can afford one, the giro ionos is the best fitting helmet i've ever encountered.
    a lot of people around vegas are getting stoked on lazer helmets
    and you can never go wrong with specialized.
    • CommentAuthorwes m.
    • CommentTimeApr 23rd 2009
     
    The bell ghisallo (sp?) is pretty well known in my area for really saving some people. I had a specialized s works that I crushed in an accident, super light and comfy but this was a medium size crash and the helmet basically exploded, in a hard crash it may not have saved me. Now I ride a bell variant mtb helmet. Its comfortable and by appearance it seems like it will protect my head really well. I hope to never find out.
  1.  
    I wear a Bern Brentwood. Good helmet, comfy for me, and it's cool if you like the BMX style helmet thing.

    Just try on a shitload at REI or your LBS and pick whichever you like. I wouldn't just buy one off the internet without trying it on first.
  2.  
    Get what fits first, what has the functional options you want second & what it looks cool last. Remember, it's there to protect your head & if it doesn't fit good it's not going protect you as well. If you buy one "just becouse it look's cool", you may be looking cool with a busted head... You don't have to spend a lot to get good protection.
    • CommentAuthoreaglerock
    • CommentTimeApr 23rd 2009 edited
     
    Posted By: RideEverydayJust try on a shitload at REI or your LBS and pick whichever you like. I wouldn't just buy one off the internet without trying it on first.


    Amen to that; fit is really the most important thing. If it doesn't fit well, it won't cushion your brain-bone properly when you need it. Worse yet, if it doesn't fit right and it's uncomfortable, you may not wear it at all.

    What most people don't appreciate about helmets is that the shiny, pretty plastic on the outside is not what protects you. What protects your skull/brain is the cellfoam inside the plastic shell, which dissipates the force of the impact so your skull doesn't crack and your brain bounces around less; the shiny plastic just keeps the foam in place. But it's got to be snugly fitted on your head, or a loose helmet will give your skull airspace to bounce around in. Basically, if the helmet has a CPSC sticker in it, it's supposed to protect you. Beyond that, the differences are primarily matters of fashion and fit.

    I'm a helmet paranoiac. I always wear one, even if I have to turn around to go back and get it - which I often do. I've done a bit of research on which helmets are better brain n' whiplash protectors, and I tend to rely on the advice of the Bicycle Helmet Safety Institute, a D.C. nonprofit that obsesses about such things.

    I ride two helmets:


    • Pro-Tec Ace Freestyle - rated as a skateboard/rollerskate helmet (and so, qualified for multiple crashes), this is a combat helmet.
      It's a rounded shape with a few small air vents. On the bike side, it's more commonly worn by BMX guys, who expect to hit the ground more often. The advantages are: Cheap (about $30 list), durable (the multi-crash thing), great for the unexpected thrills of street riding. The disadvantages: It's heavy and hot. I've done rides as long as 30 miles with this thing, and I get supersweaty. On top of that, it's matte black: menacing-looking, but it soaks up heat.


    • Giro Pneumo - Giro's high-end race helmet from the Early Lance Era. It's got the roadie venting and the ducktail back, but the ducktail is less extreme than it is on a lot of other Giro models (BHSI thinks that ducktails may cause neck damage in a crash, by preventing your head from turning while your body turns). It's way lighter-weight; it's much cooler (a lot of bigass vents). I find that the Pneumo fits my head well, while neither the Atmos (the Giro helmet that replaced the Pneumo at the top end) nor the Ionos (the Giro helmet that replaced the Atmos at the top end) fits at all. For me, the Atmos and Ionos bulge out around the temples, while the Pneumo seems to be designed for a longer skull.

    • CommentAuthormuckymucky
    • CommentTimeApr 23rd 2009 edited
     
    do helmets really work? anyone have any good readings on this? (no sheldon please =/ no pix = me suffocate)
  3.  
    I heard helmets take control of your brain and force you to ride more dangerously. They also create a magnetic field that attracts cars while simultaneously taking control of the car driver's brain, creating the illusion in their mind that the cyclist is in fact, a car.
    • CommentAuthorthe rabbi
    • CommentTimeApr 23rd 2009
     
    Posted By: muckymuckydo helmets really work? anyone have any good readings on this? (no sheldon please =/ no pix = me suffocate)
    that has to be the stupidest question i have ever heard (read).
    • CommentAuthorsfbee
    • CommentTimeApr 23rd 2009
     
    Posted By: the rabbithat has to be the stupidest question i have ever heard (read).


    Ditto. While not wearing one might seem convenient at the time of hopping on your bike, it won't seem as convenient when your flipping over the hood of the car rolling that stop sign or light.

    I saw a news segment once based on a study that drivers pass cyclists with helmets more aggressively than those riding commando. Couldn't find the video clip for it, but the following link pretty much sums it up

    http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/51695.php
    • CommentAuthorlatron
    • CommentTimeApr 23rd 2009
     
    Posted By: eaglerockGiro Pneumo


    I second that. The vents are huge and that makes an enormous difference come summer. Great fit too (at least for me).
    • CommentAuthoreaglerock
    • CommentTimeApr 23rd 2009 edited
     
    Posted By: sfbeeI saw a news segment once based on a study that drivers pass cyclists with helmets more aggressively than those riding commando. Couldn't find the video clip for it, but the following link pretty much sums it up

    http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/51695.php


    Of course, the fundamental flaw in that researcher's test is that the only common factor in each of the "over 2,500 overtaking motorists in Salisbury and Bristol" is the one cyclist videotaping said motorists - the researcher himself. He was hit two out of 2,500 times, and was wearing a helmet on both occasions; this means that after the impacts, he was both alive and functional. If he hadn't been wearing a helmet during those same two incidents, there not have been a report at all, since Dr. Walker might have been preoccupied with drooling down his chest, or relearning motor skills, or haunting his surviving relatives.

    If there's only one cyclist as a test subject, who determines that the test subject doesn't bike like an errant, reckless fool? The test administrator, who just happens to be the same guy? Color me dubious.

    However, the fact that there are silly tests out there doesn't disprove the theory, even if it doesn't prove it. And shooting the messenger ("do helmets really work?") doesn't eliminate the message; a lot of bikers dislike helmets for aesthetic/comfort/ideological/cheapskate reasons, and they are attuned to arguments that justify their own preference - as are we all.

    I don't know of any tests that "prove" that helmets keep cyclists safer; I'm not completely sure how such a test could be reliably conducted, since you'd have to put the same set of human test subjects (for body consistency and reaction times) into identical crashes both with and without helmets. My guess is that any human who went through a crash test serious enough to potentially cause injury with a helmet would be unwilling to follow it up with a test without a helmet; I know I wouldn't do it. And what kind of research would you trust, if that research contradicts your own position?

    I think of myself as a pretty cautious rider, but how would I know? Would the motorists/cyclists/pedestrians around me agree? It's the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle in action; the observer alters the thing he observes, merely by his observation.

    I have been through two pretty serious crashes, both with helmets. Both were solo events: No cars, no other bikes, no pedestrians, no critters - just me and the thing I hit. The most recent crash was summer of '06, when I went over an unexpected break in the pavement, panicked, leaned a little, lost my balance...laid it down flat on my right side and slid along broken blacktop for about 30 feet, with my legs tangled in the frame. The right side of my face slid one inch from the ground, cushioned by my skateboard helmet. I could see the broken pavement coming up, and I could feel the blood dripping from my knees, hands and arm. I thought to myself: "If I weren't wearing this helmet, my face would be shredded, and I might snap my neck."

    Now, ideologues might say: You were careless, and it serves you right. Maybe so. But how can you be sure? And can you be sure that you won't slip up that way - ever?

    30 months later, I can see the scars on my knuckles, my palms. I see my empurpled knees every day, and they're still stiff. I can feel the scars on my right shoulder and forearm. They'll never go away. But [Muhammad_Ali_voice]I'm still pretty![/Muhammad_Ali_voice], and my brain still works.

    If you don't want to wear a helmet, then don't (as long as you're not in El Cerrito, mucky, where helmets are required for cyclists of all ages). But the way I do the math is: In any conflict between a moving bicycle and any other object (car, bike, pedestrian, tree, dog, flat surface), the cyclist loses, no matter what. At the point of impact, right/wrong or legal/illegal are irrelevant; the cyclist is going to get banged up. I want to be on the side of the equation that has better odds of keeping my precious, delicious brain in usable condition.
    • CommentAuthorLyKqiD
    • CommentTimeApr 23rd 2009
     
    Check this out... for those who dont want to wear a helmet but still want their skull in one piece.

    Quiksilver d3o Beanie
  4.  
    Posted By: LyKqiDCheck this out... for those who dont want to wear a helmet but still want their skull in one piece.

    Quiksilver d3o Beanie


    Wow, I think they are on to something there! Still really I think it all comes down to natural selection with helmet use...
    • CommentAuthoreaglerock
    • CommentTimeApr 23rd 2009
     
    And they have the Ultimate Testing Standard: If you can whack the funny-looking English guy in the head with a shovel, and both the shovel and the funny-looking English guy's earflap cap are filled with orange intelligent-molecule gel, and after you whack the funny-looking English guy, he google-grins at you at says it doesn't hurt, it works!

    I have a big swarm of WTF bees wheeling about my head...
    • CommentAuthormuckymucky
    • CommentTimeApr 23rd 2009 edited
     
    rabbi be nice please.

    anyway, im trying to imagine how people get hit~ and the obvious point is that a helmet provides no neck protection in case of any whiplash or sudden motion and damage to the neck (spine injury)

    do people who get hit usually get their skulls smash open? (if not protected by helmet at time of impact)

    Posted By: the rabbi
    Posted By: muckymuckydo helmets really work? anyone have any good readings on this? (no sheldon please =/ no pix = me suffocate)
    that has to be the stupidest question i have ever heard (read).
    • CommentAuthorbionnaki
    • CommentTimeApr 23rd 2009
     
    yes.
    head trauma is quite common.

    talk to an EMT sometime.

    one tip: wear a helmet correctly with your forehead covered.

    I recommend bell furio. inexpensive, non-mushroom head, light, well-ventilated.
    wear a cycling cap underneath to block the sun when it's in your eyes and dunk the cap in water for a nice cooling effect.
    • CommentAuthorthe rabbi
    • CommentTimeApr 24th 2009
     
    Posted By: muckymuckyrabbi be nice please.

    anyway, im trying to imagine how people get hit~ and the obvious point is that a helmet provides no neck protection in case of any whiplash or sudden motion and damage to the neck (spine injury)

    do people who get hit usually get their skulls smash open? (if not protected by helmet at time of impact)

    Posted By: the rabbi
    Posted By: muckymuckydo helmets really work? anyone have any good readings on this? (no sheldon please =/ no pix = me suffocate)
    that has to be the stupidest question i have ever heard (read).
    when you get hit you're most likely gonna hit the ground, with no time to react and brace yourself. you may fall a thousand times and not hit your head, but the one time you hit your head may be the last time you ever see the light of day.
    • CommentAuthoryoxscotty
    • CommentTimeApr 24th 2009
     
    glad to see a lot of people backing giro! i wear a giro monza. best fitting helmet i've ever owned and good for the price.

    as previously mentioned, buy what fits. different companies make helmets to fit different people; for instance, bell helmets are always tight on the forehead and back of my head. giros fit me perfectly. after speaking with many people, it seems as though bell helments fit those with longer heads than rounder heads. helment shopping is fun! look out for sales on 2008 helments around this time of year too.
    • CommentAuthormuckymucky
    • CommentTimeApr 24th 2009
     
    yea 've heard good things about the giro~
 
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