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    • CommentAuthorAKang47
    • CommentTimeJul 4th 2012 edited
     
    I'm running a 47x15 ratio right now, I tried my friend's Caad 5 track bike and he was running 52x16 which he felt pretty awesome and it wasn't hard to skid at all.
    It'll be for street riding, brakeless. Don't think I'll have any problems with it.

    What do you guys think?
  1.  
    RIP Your knees
    • CommentAuthorNick A
    • CommentTimeJul 4th 2012
     
    nothing we could say would determine if you would like it or have any problems with it, only way to determine that is to go out and ride with it around town. Only thing i would say is that it may be harsh on your knees after awhile, from just skidding and stuff. Just go out and ride it. Only way to find out.
    • CommentAuthorMancha150
    • CommentTimeJul 4th 2012
     
    Please dont do it. I ran 50x16 for a while thinking it was not too bad, but it is. ESPECIALLY without a brake. I mean, you wont be able to accellerate fast, and going up hills is going to do a number on your knees
  2.  
    Honestly don't do it. Anything over 80 gear inches isn't practical unless your on the track. If you're worried about getting faster what you should do is gear down and learn to spin. A while ago I had a old conversion with a 40/19 it seriously sucked riding around town with it but I learned to spin. Now my max cadence is about 160-170 rpm on a downhill. Overall if you know how to use it you'll be faster with a lower ratio.
    • CommentAuthorveggie
    • CommentTimeJul 4th 2012
     
    Spin to win.
    • CommentAuthorBummer
    • CommentTimeJul 4th 2012
     
    My knees hurt just thinking about it.
  3.  
    52-16 is a huge gear for the track let alone the street.
  4.  
    1) Its not that big a gear–if you're riding on flat terrain, not constantly accelerating hard, and not trying to skid all the time.
    2) It is a big gear to be riding all the time
    3) Why ride a big gear on a street bike? No really, why? I want to know.
    • CommentAuthorTracker
    • CommentTimeJul 4th 2012
     
    Street cred, it's one point per gear inch, at least I think that's the value on the street right now. Ok, but 52x16 is only a few more inches than your current 47x15, going up one tooth on a rear cog is like going up 2-3 on your chain ring, so if you get a 49t chain ring you'll have about the same ratio as your friend. So just keep your current ratio or go with an slightly easier ratio, you'll be glad you did in the long run.
  5.  
    I ride 52-16 on 3 bikes, but I live in Florida and I just happen to have a ton of 52t rings that were going unused. It's flat and boring here, and I almost never skid, let alone stop. I also run 48-18 as my lowest and used to (foolishly) run 55-13. I find 52-16 to be a very pleasant ratio for fast rides, but I will admit I like to push big gears. My honest favorite gear ever was 50-16, but I got rid of those rings.
    • CommentAuthorBamfs01
    • CommentTimeJul 5th 2012
     
    Posted By: Indians4498752-16 is a huge gear for the track let alone the street.


    88" is far from huge on the track.
    • CommentAuthorchku
    • CommentTimeJul 5th 2012
     
    The typical track ratio is 50/15.

    Masher here (I climb on a 44T chainring), 52/16 is a foolish street gear, even if you live in a flat, windless city. It might feel huge, but you'll go slow.
    • CommentAuthorBamfs01
    • CommentTimeJul 5th 2012 edited
     
    Sorry but there's no such thing as a "typical track ratio".

    It all depends on the racer, track, event, etc...

    All of these generalizations are silly.

    The original question is a trick question and the answer is this: Try this ratio out. Try many different gear inches out. If it feels good, keep it. Although there are some very general statements that may work for many, each individuals situation is unique. There are too many variables to answer your question with any reasonable level of certainty.

    Everyone here that's specifically saying "oh that won't work" or "oh this will be great" are doing so under very specific assumptions. You wanna get specific about it? You'll need to know what size tire he's running, how much air is in those tires, what size cranks he's running (and more specifically, are they the right length for his body)? How fit is he? What kind of fitness are we talking (endro? sprinter?) Where is he riding? Is there a lot of wind? Hills? Traffic?... The list goes on.

    TL;DR? We can't answer your question. Try it out and do what works best for you.

    [edit]: spelllingz
  6.  
    Posted By: Bamfs01Sorry but there's no such thing as a "typical track ratio".

    It all depends on the racer, track, event, etc...

    All of these generalizations are silly.

    The original question is a trick question and the answer is this: Try this ratio out. Try many different gear inches out. If it feels good, keep it. Although there are some very general statements that may work for many, each individuals situation is unique. There are too many variables to answer your question with any reasonable level of certainty.

    Everyone here that's specifically saying "oh that won't work" or "oh this will be great" are doing so under very specific assumptions. You wanna get specific about it? You'll need to know what size tire he's running, how much air is in those tires, what size cranks he's running (and more specifically, are they the right length for his body)? How fit is he? What kind of fitness are we talking (endro? sprinter?) Where is he riding? Is there a lot of wind? Hills? Traffic?... The list goes on.

    TL;DR? We can't answer your question. Try it out and do what works best for you.

    [edit]: spelllingz


    I don't know if you read the OP's post, but he/she DID ask us for our opinions. : p
    • CommentAuthorBamfs01
    • CommentTimeJul 5th 2012
     
    and I did answer said question correctly ;P
  7.  
    Well, you kinda did. Again, like you said, this is problematic, but only because the OP is not riding in the 'drome.
  8.  
    heard from someone that a common warm-up gear on the track is 48/16, good rule of thumb to tell whether your gearing is streetworthy imo
  9.  
    Posted By: das_pyrateheard from someone that a common warm-up gear on the track is 48/16, good rule of thumb to tell whether your gearing is streetworthy imo


    yeah, pretty much around that GI. Same as for road riding, you wanna spin up to ge those legs warmed up.
    • CommentAuthoriCxLegion
    • CommentTimeJul 5th 2012
     
    you're going to cry if you live anywhere even sort of hilly.
 
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