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    • CommentAuthorbbw1
    • CommentTimeApr 11th 2009
     
    May sombody can explain ???
    • CommentAuthorgiosSR215
    • CommentTimeApr 11th 2009
     
    it's teh same sizing as a conversion the only thing is if you get a pursuit you can tend to go a little smaller then a conversion that you would buy.

    How tall are you and what is your inseam?
    • CommentAuthornikon13
    • CommentTimeApr 11th 2009
     
    If you're asking this question , maybe you shouldn't be spending too much on a frame right now...
    • CommentAuthorjam guy
    • CommentTimeApr 11th 2009
     
    Posted By: nikon13If you're asking this question , maybe you shouldn't be spending too much on a frame right now...


    I think that of any question that has ever been asked about any bike in whole entire world that this might be a completely legitimate question that deserves a legitimate answer.

    Most NJS frames are custom built. I am not a sizing expert but check the GEO and cross reference it with existing bikes including your own. I have noticed a lot of shorter top tubes on NJS bikes. If you are tall you might have some trouble. You wont find many NJS frames above a 56.
    • CommentAuthorbbw1
    • CommentTimeApr 11th 2009
     
    What is GEO ?
    • CommentAuthorjam guy
    • CommentTimeApr 11th 2009
     
    Geometry!
    • CommentAuthornikon13
    • CommentTimeApr 11th 2009
     
    That was kind of a dick comment , I know and I appologize... I'm just saying that , before you spend upwards of $700 on a frame , you should know about sizing and exactly what fits you...
  1.  
    Just make sure you do get the right size. Yoiu would not want to be racing the Keirin circut on a bike that does not fit right.
    • CommentAuthorjam guy
    • CommentTimeApr 11th 2009
     
    Posted By: nikon13That was kind of a dick comment , I know and I appologize... I'm just saying that , before you spend upwards of $700 on a frame , you should know about sizing and exactly what fits you...


    Here is how you can make up for it! Is your name based off of the camera or the name of a hacker from one of the sweetest movies ever made?
    • CommentAuthorNash
    • CommentTimeApr 11th 2009 edited
     
    go to a high end shop where you live and they should be able to properly size you for a frame and then go a $300-500 complete bike . Figure out what you do and dont like and then build something nice later. Again, remember that njs is simply a standardization and has absolutely nothing to do with build quality. I would lean towards a bike that fits you properly rather than be able to say you have a "njs" frame that doesn't fit.
    • CommentAuthorbbw1
    • CommentTimeApr 11th 2009
     
    May someone mail the list of tools I must have to build a track/fixie from scratch ?
    • CommentAuthorAaron C
    • CommentTimeApr 11th 2009 edited
     
    i really have to say that based on the questions that you have been asking here you should probably start a little less ambitious and considerably less money. my point being you do not want to be learning your bb or cog installation techniques on a $700-800 frame or expensive wheelset. start with a bike you already have, learn some wrench tech, ask tons of questions, then drop some money down on a quality frame
    plus it will give you time to consider whether or not an njs is rig is really the best way to spend your money.
    • CommentAuthorbbw1
    • CommentTimeApr 12th 2009
     
    Thank you . You are probably right ..........
    • CommentAuthorhenrydec1
    • CommentTimeApr 13th 2009
     
    I would never recommend not buying a keirin frame, I know they are expensive but most defiantly worth it in the end. I sold my other bike to buy one and don't regret it all. i would say find a frame builder you like. (I have wanted a wanted a Vivalo. because i love how Vivalo's ride.) but as size goes. downsize a little, and if you want to change the feel you can always throw on a new stem.
    • CommentAuthorsfbee
    • CommentTimeApr 13th 2009 edited
     
    Posted By: henrydec1I would never recommend not buying a keirin frame, I know they are expensive but most defiantly worth it in the end.


    I would say they're complete overkill for a entry level rider, but if you wipe your ass with your money, then go for it :)
    • CommentAuthorbbw1
    • CommentTimeApr 14th 2009
     
    Vivalo looks sexy and cool a shit but I'd better start with conversion and go from there ..........
    • CommentAuthorAaron C
    • CommentTimeApr 14th 2009
     
    i think thats probably the smartest thing. you'll catch on fast.
    honestly bmx tought me how to fix an put together a bike (if you've ever tried to figure out how you are going to ride home on a bmx after snapping an axle you know what i mean)

    shit give it a summer and do a lot of reading, think what is going to be practical for you. track bikes are awesome and a properly built one is great for commuting, but the trend wont last forever.
    if you bike for transportation, will a aggro track frame meet your needs all year round or are you going to wish you had a geared bike in 5-6 years.
    but by all means do what ever makes you enjoy riding, i have some bikes that i love but i know when i bought (or sold them) i could've put more thought into it.
    • CommentAuthorbbw1
    • CommentTimeApr 16th 2009
     
    Aaron C - thank you for your explanation .
    • CommentAuthorwillyum279
    • CommentTimeFeb 10th 2010
     
    question guys, if i have a 62cm conversion, would i get a 62cm track frame as well. cause the 62cm fuji conversion i have fits perfect, but i want to see how a track frame rides. i dont really know anyone with that size track frame. i was thinkinkg about getting a 60cm but not sure. cause i want it to fit almost exactly as my conversion....can anyone help?
  2.  
    Measure your standover height, measure your top tube and find a frame with measurements similar to those. Or go to a shop and get fitted.... The second one. Track frames often don't fit the same way road frames do, not to mention the fact that measurement techniques vary from company to company.
 
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