velospace is about bikes and the people who ride them marketplace photos random forums














    • CommentAuthore-unit
    • CommentTimeFeb 25th 2012
     
    I've got an old Ambrosio Logos disc that needs the equally old glue removed. Since the rim is not made of carbon, but rather "fiber reinforced resin with phenolic expanding fillers" I am hesitant to use anything as harsh as acetone on it for fear of compromising the structural integrity of the composite. I've already tried a little bit of goof off, which is a mix of acetone and xylene, but the paint in the tyre bed started to strip off. I also tried goo gone, which did almost nothing to soften the glue. Does anybody have any experience with these wheels or know of any alternative methods for getting hard old glue off?
  1.  
    I would suggest contacting Ambrosio directly... although I am sure they will give you a very conservative response for fear of liability...
  2.  
    I was never good at gluing and ride clinchers now - the 'composition' of my old tubular rims is still aluminium. Indeed, I remember messing around with acetone. ... Your rim, contrastingly, might be made of some sort of kevlar/aramid compound (cf. tire carcass), which -I think- a friend of mine experimented with back in the pre-carbon age. Don't use acetone, unless you got in touch with an expert in chemistry. There might also be experienced track riders which might be familiar with this 'rather exotic'(?) rim compound. Pics please :D
  3.  
    ... just noticed that it's a 'disk'. Could it be an aluminium rim laminated into an aramid disk ???
    Cheers.
    • CommentAuthorgoldfish06
    • CommentTimeFeb 25th 2012
     
    WD-40 may help you remove the glue, and it should not damage the rim's resin. Just make sure you clean it with rubbing alcohol afterwards to remove the leftover WD-40.
    • CommentAuthorbettermade
    • CommentTimeFeb 25th 2012
     
    no. no. no.

    just sand it a little bit, never remove all the old glue, leave it a new tubular will stick better.
    • CommentAuthore-unit
    • CommentTimeFeb 25th 2012
     
    Posted By: felissilvestris... just noticed that it's a 'disk'. Could it be an aluminium rim laminated into an aramid disk ???
    Cheers.

    The rim is most certainly composite. In the areas where the paint is chipped, the fiber structure is visible.


    Posted By: bettermadeno. no. no.

    just sand it a little bit, never remove all the old glue, leave it a new tubular will stick better.

    I did consider leaving the glue, however, the guys down at the shop made a good point when they noted that the glue was extremely old and of an unknown brand. For the sake of making things easier for the shop when they glue my tyre on, I plan on removing the old glue.
    I've sent an e-mail to Ambrosio, but I'm not optimistic about receiving a useful response. Hopefully somebody knows some tricks for getting this crusty stuff off...
  4.  
    Not specific to this topic... But this document is considered the definitive article on tubular mounting, and covers the topic of when to remove glue from the rim, and how to do it... But unfortunately it only covers alloy rims, and not carbon/composite

    http://www.engr.ku.edu/~kuktl/bicycle/Cusa1.pdf
    • CommentAuthoreaglerock
    • CommentTimeFeb 25th 2012
     
    FWIW, Park Tool specifically recommends acetone to clean carbon rims:

    http://www.parktool.com/blog/repair-help/tubular-tire-gluing

    It may differ depending on the composition of the plastics holding the carbon fibers together. But isn't the "good carbon"/"bad carbon" distinction an issue of layup technique, not of materials?
    • CommentAuthorBummer
    • CommentTimeFeb 25th 2012
     
    Posted By: e-unit
    For the sake of making things easier for the shop when they glue my tyre on


    Just let the guys at the shop deal with it, that's what you're paying them to do.
    • CommentAuthore-unit
    • CommentTimeFeb 25th 2012
     
    Posted By: Bummer
    Posted By: e-unit
    For the sake of making things easier for the shop when they glue my tyre on


    Just let the guys at the shop deal with it, that's what you're paying them to do.

    lol and pay for the 12 hours they'd spend scraping at it?
    Eaglerock and robson, thanks for the links. Still unsure about this acetone business though...
    • CommentAuthorShaku
    • CommentTimeFeb 25th 2012
     
    Posted By: e-unit
    Posted By: Bummer
    Posted By: e-unit
    For the sake of making things easier for the shop when they glue my tyre on


    Just let the guys at the shop deal with it, that's what you're paying them to do.

    lol and pay for the 12 hours they'd spend scraping at it?
    Eaglerock and robson, thanks for the links. Still unsure about this acetone business though...


    Ionno if this helps any, i've never dealt with tubulars or carbon rims, but I know simple green is recommended to clean stuff in more delicate situations. Maybe the same concept could apply to this situation?
    • CommentAuthore-unit
    • CommentTimeFeb 26th 2012
     
    I don't think simple green will do much. It's more of a detergent than a solvent. Anybody know if prep-sol will do anything?
    • CommentAuthorBummer
    • CommentTimeFeb 26th 2012
     
    Posted By: e-unit
    Posted By: Bummer
    Posted By: e-unit
    For the sake of making things easier for the shop when they glue my tyre on


    Just let the guys at the shop deal with it, that's what you're paying them to do.

    lol and pay for the 12 hours they'd spend scraping at it?
    Eaglerock and robson, thanks for the links. Still unsure about this acetone business though...


    well.... in my face then.
    • CommentAuthorchain suck
    • CommentTimeFeb 26th 2012 edited
     
    ...
  5.  
    I would agree with earlier post to leave well enough a;one, If it adheres so well that nothing short of thermonuclear detonation will get it to buge, then a new tack coat will be all thats needs to install a new set. Larger gobs should just be manualy popped od with a blade. Rubbing alcohol if left to sit a bit softens most adhesives well. A heat gun set on low will help with any goobers that are outside the wheel bed, and are simply un attractive or interfere with brake pad contact.
    • CommentAuthorHaegan
    • CommentTimeFeb 26th 2012
     
    Posted By: chain suck
    When you do get it clean, consider using tape (Tufo or Jantex) instead of glue; it will make for easier cleanup next time. Tape also makes it easier to do it yourself rather than paying a shop.

    Of course, once you take advice from an old retro-grouch like me

    a retro-grouch recommending tufo tape?!?
  6.  
    Posted By: Haegan
    Posted By: chain suck
    When you do get it clean, consider using tape (Tufo or Jantex) instead of glue; it will make for easier cleanup next time. Tape also makes it easier to do it yourself rather than paying a shop.

    Of course, once you take advice from an old retro-grouch like me

    a retro-grouch recommending tufo tape?!?


    +1

    I hear a lot of people saying they don't trust tape... and Tufo recomends tape only with their tubulars (not surprisingly of course, for liability reasons, as well as to steer people toward using their tubs...)

    use tape, and go on faith, or glue it and have confidence in your gluing abilities... that said, with tubulars no matter what method you use to mount your tub, nothing is guaranteed 100% but then again, I've heard of people having the sidewalls of their clinchers blow on them multiple times, and zero rolled tubs... so it's a YMMV situation
    • CommentAuthorchain suck
    • CommentTimeFeb 26th 2012 edited
     
    ...
    • CommentAuthoreaglerock
    • CommentTimeFeb 27th 2012 edited
     
    Posted By: Bummerwell.... in my face then.

    Well, it depends on the shop. A lot of shops won't glue tires on, because they:

    1) Don't want the potential liability of having your tires roll off the rims, leading to lawsuits

    2) Don't know how to glue a tubular tire on

    It's been more than 30 years since tubular tires were standard issue on any bike aimed at consumers. I've got 14 bike shops in my geographically small town; I can think of maybe two guys, at two different shops, whom I'd trust to glue tires; both of them are well over 50. Most of the wrenches at most of the shops I go into are of the Hipster Generation, even at venerable old shops; I wouldn't trust them with anything that requires specialized old-school knowledge.

    If you need a tubbie glued, go around to all your local shops, and give the job to the oldest mechanic you can find. He's the most likely one to have faced tire and glue in anger before. But don't give it to anyone under 50.
 
\



velospace | about, FAQ & policies | contact | blog | status | site map
© 2005-2011 velospace. All Rights Reserved.