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    • CommentAuthoranthony f
    • CommentTimeFeb 17th 2012
     
    It's been a long time in the making, but Cleveland is finally getting a velodrome!

    I will likely just race my Bianchi Pista (I don't want to wreck my Merckx) until I determine whether or not track racing is something that I'd like to invest in, but with that said, I've also been toying with the idea of eventually building up a track specific bike... The track itself is outdoors and will be 250 meters.

    I typically have an aversion to oversized aluminum aero tubes, carbon forks, and other new jack stuff, but I would probably treat this bike as more of a tool opposed to something that interests me and looks neat, so whatever works best. I know that stiffness and power transfer generally usurps weight and to a certain extent aerodynamics... And I also notice that most people use a smaller frames, clinchers, and Omniums with an FSA or Zen ring seem to be par for the course... But I'm kind of drawing a blank beyond that.

    Any suggestions or input? FYI I'd like to keep this within a reasonable budget ($1,500 +/-), so while a Comete may be the best wheelset available, it's really out of the question. I guess my biggest concern at this point is a frame...

    Thanks!
  1.  
    Are you going to be starting at Cat 5 or do you have some track racing experience?

    You're right about treating the bike like a tool. A good track race bike doesn't have to be fancy. Reasonable geometry, no-nonsense aluminum, and a carbon fork and you've got enough bike to race to a really high level. I know a couple people who've won Master's National Championships on Fuji Track Pros with box-section tubulars, so carbon frames, aero wheels, and the like are not a pre-requisite for racing to a high level. Hell, I rode up to Cat 2 without aerodynamic wheels.

    Any of Fuji, Giant, Specialized, Felt, Trek, Bianchi, or whatever brand's mid-range alu framesets with carbon fork will be enough bike for your purposes.
    • CommentAuthor2011
    • CommentTimeFeb 17th 2012
     
    You have more chance wrecking on the street then riding a velodrome. I would surely ride a Merckx over a Bianchi Pista, if given the choice on the track.

    Personally... I would just make your Merckx more track-ready (however clearly the frame is too big for you, judging by the tiny amount of seatpost showing). Throw on some clipless pedals, smooth lightweight tires.

    Don't feel the need to have a full carbon or even oversized aluminum build for the track. Steel is still just fine for a beginner. Even so, I still see many older Master track racers riding steel, and they can beat the crap out of the young kids on full carbon bikes.
  2.  
    ^yeah, it's definitely about the rider more so than the bike.

    Right thing to do would be to race the Bianchi till you make sure you like it - spend your money on good wheels, pedals, and shoes, and race entries - and buy a better bike if you know you're going to be racing for a while.
    • CommentAuthorelhephe
    • CommentTimeFeb 17th 2012
     
    I think the biggest thing you can do for yourself for the track is get some good tubular wheels.And after that, buy the chainrings/cogs to be able to change your gearing.

    I know a lot of people that race cat1/2 and a lot of people who are competitive at masters natz that race on FTPs and TK2s.
    The frame doesn't really make a huge difference, but I can notice a difference when I ride a crap par of wheels on the track.
    that being said, anything with some dura ace/suzue/phil/any middle-to-upper-level hub will do. I'm a big fan of more spokes than you think you need, i know a lot of people are going to disagree with me, but i weigh 200 lbs, and anything less than 24 spokes gets wonky in the turns.

    As for gearing, if you're only riding 1 track, you won't need as many options as if you travel, but it does matter. I change mine several times during training sessions. Also I mess with it depending on the race, whether or not there's wind, and my personal fitness level.

    just remember, Spin to win, Mash to crash
  3.  
    Posted By: elhepheAs for gearing, if you're only riding 1 track, you won't need as many options as if you travel, but it does matter. I change mine several times during training sessions. Also I mess with it depending on the race, whether or not there's wind, and my personal fitness level.

    just remember, Spin to win, Mash to crash


    Yeah pretty much. I definitely change my standard or baseline gearing if I race at different velodromes but changing for different races is pretty crucial. It's easy to get by with two chainrings and two cogs but a compliment of 48 through 51 and 14 through 16 is useful.

    Agreed on wheels... In fact I messaged the OP asking if he wanted to buy my old track wheels.
    • CommentAuthorKevint143
    • CommentTimeFeb 23rd 2012 edited
     
    I miss you jeff

    I saw your bike at Ryans and thought you were back in town bummer life
  4.  
    I researched the specs on the track they are building and my advice as far as wheels would be either Campagnolo Pista tubulars or mavic ellipse. Both have track/track rear hubs so you can run two cogs and either rim set can be found at a descent deal ($350-$400). As far as frames go, geometry matters more then brand on the track. I have a size 54 Dolan pre cursa thats more aggressive and responsive then a FTP or TK2. Look up the specs on BT or corima and see what frames carry a geometry close to those at a lower price. I have a twice ridden 2011 specialized S-works langster that I started to build and am now trying to get rid of. Get some good clipless pedals and some sidi's with a helmet and ride. GO FAST AND TURN LEFT!!!
 
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