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    • CommentAuthorAKang47
    • CommentTimeJan 14th 2012
     
    I'm beginning to bike more and more now and I wanna go and rides with some other fixed gear bikers in my area but I don't think I can keep up with them.

    They have these 50 mile rides once in a while and I want to go but I think I'd be too slow. Besides that, they have weekly rides on different days of the week.

    I'm not too slow but my stamina sucks.
    How can I improve my endurance and bike faster and longer? Is a there any type of good regimen or plan to improve?
    Also, how can I get up hills faster?


    My bike, constructive criticism is appreciated.
    • CommentAuthorR_o_b_s_o_n
    • CommentTimeJan 14th 2012 edited
     
    EPO...


    in all honesty.... just ride more.... ride a certain distance one time... and then the next time ride further.... ride up hills... and then try to get up them faster... there's a lot more to it.... try getting a book from the library on training?
  1.  
    what is your gear ratio?

    well to bike faster, you need to lighten up your bike a bit
    jog or run to build up your lungs and leg muscles
    and have a plan/date to bike endurance and sprinting

    i suggest you to change the risers to drops or bullhorns
    • CommentAuthorShaku
    • CommentTimeJan 14th 2012
     
    Change your gear ratio for hills, but in doing so, you'll spin out a lot faster on the flats.

    but for endurance, all you can do is just keep riding.

    Or go for runs, or workout in a gym with free weights (not those useless machines) 2-3 times a week (preferably with a day in between to give your muscles a break)

    Swimming is also good for endurance. You just have to do a little bit more than running to get similar effects. also its a great full body workout, and you get the lungs of a fish :D lol great for that last wind to push it through on that spring on a bike.
    • CommentAuthorShaku
    • CommentTimeJan 14th 2012
     
    And remember a lighter bike hardly does much (although i will get flack for this statement)

    Just find a proper gear, like for me i've found i like mid 60 gear inches (check sheldon brown for a gear calculator)

    +1 on the drops or bullhorns, they'll help you get into a more aero position and typically more efficient one for pedaling.

    And make sure your bike fits so that you arent wasting potential energy that you may have. make sure you can almost fully extend your leg at the bottom of your cadence. its a basic way of deciding if its the right size
  2.  
    Posted By: NightStalkerwhat is your gear ratio?

    well to bike faster, you need to lighten up your bike a bit


    I'm sorry... but there is a huge myth about "light bikes are faster" this is pure bullsh!t.... I ride a 26lb steel bike from 1983 with racks and fenders on it... and I drop guys on 17lb carbon bikes... weight means nothing in terms of speed... what it does affect is how much energy you use over a given distance or up hills... Racers use light bikes, because it means they're using less energy on climbs, and have more energy at the end of a race for the sprint finish... if you REALLY want to improve your strength and speed... ride a heavy bike to train, and then race on a light bike... but the straight statement that a light bike = a faster bike is absolutely false....

    I would suggest going on the weekly rides... they're not going to be too long, compared to the 50mile ride... and if they're anything like the local fixed rides here, they take lots of breaks... maybe riding for about 15min, and stop for a rest, and then ride another 15min or so... you never know till you try it... set yourself a bench mark, and work up from there.... really the only real way to get faster and build endurance is to ride lots...
    • CommentAuthorbettermade
    • CommentTimeJan 14th 2012
     
    get a road bike and a heart rate monitor.

    but since you just got into it and probably just want to ride fixed;

    twice a week; pick a low gear, 42x17 or something, go on 4 hour easy rides (around 15mph) if you can still properly talk during the ride you are doing it right, if your not able to talk without breathing heavily you are pushing too hard.

    twice a week; do some shorter 1,5h interval rides on higher gearing for some more power.

    stick to that for 3 months and you will be flying.
    • CommentAuthorShaku
    • CommentTimeJan 14th 2012
     
    Never keep up, keep trying, push through the pain, and you will achieve whatever you set your mind to :)
    • CommentAuthorChris V
    • CommentTimeJan 14th 2012
     
    Put more miles into your legs. Simple as that. That was the best advice anyone ever game me when I started riding.
    • CommentAuthorHaegan
    • CommentTimeJan 14th 2012 edited
     
    didn't read anything, but ride faster and longer.

    *edit also get brakes and a freewheel and drop handlebars.
    • CommentAuthorShaku
    • CommentTimeJan 14th 2012
     
    also i will say fixed gear will help you learn to get a nice cadence.

    remember to power through the whole rotation, pull up with the one foot, and push down with the other.

    You will get tired faster though as you are extending and shorting your muscles almost continuously
    • CommentAuthorChris V
    • CommentTimeJan 14th 2012
     
    Posted By: bettermadeget a road bike and a heart rate monitor.

    but since you just got into it and probably just want to ride fixed;

    twice a week; pick a low gear, 42x17 or something, go on 4 hour easy rides (around 15mph) if you can still properly talk during the ride you are doing it right, if your not able to talk without breathing heavily you are pushing too hard.

    twice a week; do some shorter 1,5h interval rides on higher gearing for some more power.

    stick to that for 3 months and you will be flying.


    This is great advice. I did something similar to this but running instead of biking and it works great. Works out your cardio and your muscles exquisitely.
    • CommentAuthorscmalex
    • CommentTimeJan 14th 2012
     
    As far as bike setup (on a street "fixie"):
    -I am going to join everyone on the drops/bullhorns thing, but i would advise against track drops, they are not really practical in the street even though they look cool. get something that is the proper width for your body and has at least one hand position that is very relaxed.
    -lowish gear ratio... usually around 65 gear inches. this wont win you any track sprints, but it will help on the hills and improve your control at higher cadences.

    As far as riding:
    -gradually increasing the level of intensity on my rides by either going a longer distance or tackling a hillier route.
    -ride a lot! have at least 1 day a week dedicated to a longer ride, and fit riding into your schedule whenever you have some downtime.
    -ride with people better than you. they can help you more than people on the internet can and generally push you to be better.
    -ride other kinds of bikes (in a different setting of course) you will be surprised how the skills you develop on a mountain bike or a road bike can improve your skills on a track bike and vice versa.
    -intervals: sprint, relax, repeat.

    sorry if i repeated what other people said
  3.  
    No one gave you good answers on Bikeforum that you had to post the same exact question here?
  4.  
    I can't imagine riding 20 let alone 50 on that bike.
    • CommentAuthorChrisE
    • CommentTimeJan 14th 2012
     
    Plus one for the drops. Also some better foot retention, namely clipless, will make your ride much more enjoyable. A brake would be advisable as well, will give you confidence to ride faster. Good gearing too. Looks like you might be running 46x16 which should be ok depending on how heavy you are. I'm 135 and ran 46x16 for a while, even up some moderate hills around town.
  5.  
    Posted By: Haeganget brakes and a freewheel and drop handlebars.


    At least get brake brake and some different bars. Thats not even a riser bar. Looks almost straight to me. Riding 50 miles in one position sounds terrible. Stay fixed if you like fixed, but I really think having a brake is a good idea. It will help you deal with sketchy situations, conserve some energy and its removable!

    As everyone else said though, the best thing to do is just exercise.
    • CommentAuthorBummer
    • CommentTimeJan 15th 2012
     
    Posted By: bensonisajewNo one gave you good answers on Bikeforum that you had to post the same exact question here?


    What's wrong with getting different opinions?
    • CommentAuthorthe rabbi
    • CommentTimeJan 15th 2012
     
    Posted By: octopus magicI can't imagine riding 20 let alone 50 on that bike.
    • CommentAuthorrburnham13
    • CommentTimeJan 16th 2012
     
    The Eddy Merckx method....."Ride lots"
    It truly is the best advice for anyone....especially a beginner. Work on building a base fitness first. Don't bother working on any interval/speed stuff yet. Get a good base, then do intervals.
    Try doing some "tempo" workouts. Ride at a hard steady pace (zone 3 heart rate) for a 15-20 minutes interval. Ride easy for 15 min, then do it again. Do these weekly increasing up to 45-60 min intervals. This will build a very strong base fitness.
    A heart rate monitor really helps to help you get to know your body. It's a great tool for training.
    There are so many methods of training. Go get a book on training, it will really help.
    Good luck.
 
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