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    • CommentAuthorttmartini
    • CommentTimeOct 12th 2011
     
    So I just picked up this old bianchi and when I got it the cranks were tight but today after my first good ride on it there was play in the cranks after a quick inspection it was the spindle that was moving. The cranks and bottom bracket cups are tight this is the first old road bike ive ever had and have never seen this problem before. how can I fix this? What made this happen, and how can I stop it from happing?
  1.  
    the bearings may be old?
    • CommentAuthorkumotaki
    • CommentTimeOct 12th 2011
     
    Too many possibilites for us to answer your question positively. Hellafast may be right, old bearings. Has it been your bike for a long time? Did you buy it recently? Maybe the previous careless owner repacked the BB with too small loose bearings. If you're sure about the fact that the problem comes from the spindle, you should take the bottom bracket off and check it. We'll be able to help you then.
    • CommentAuthorpeazweag
    • CommentTimeOct 12th 2011 edited
     
    you didnt say but if its old enough might have a italian threaded BB,the right fixed cup is right hand thread and they are known to come loose (unscrew).I will bet thats your problem,older french frames have a right hand thread fixed cup also.What I do is disassemble BB clean it an when I re assemble it I use 242 blue loctite on the right cup.should take care of your problem/
    • CommentAuthorkumotaki
    • CommentTimeOct 12th 2011 edited
     
    Posted By: peazweagyou didnt say but if its old enough might have a italian threaded BB,the right fixed cup is right hand thread and they are known to come loose (unscrew).I will bet thats your problem,older french frames have a right hand thread fixed cup also.What I do is disassemble BB clean it an when I re assemble it I use 242 blue loctite on the right cup.should take care of your problem/


    This makes a lot of sense indeed! Why didn't I think about that? Stupid me...
  2.  
    If that is not the problem, I'm going to say the cups/bearings are shot and you should stat looking for a new BB.
    • CommentAuthorSkidMark
    • CommentTimeOct 12th 2011
     
    Your description is vague, so it is impossible to understand what is going on. When you say everything is tight do you mean the lockring is tight? Everything can be tight but not properly adjusted. It sounds like the bottom bracket just needs to overhauled. The easy way out on this is to buy a sealed bottom bracket and just be done with it. You can repack the original bottom bracket but be warned that it is likely loose ball, so there is a good chance ball bearings will fall out onto the floor when you take it apart, and getting them to stay in place with grease is sometimes annoying.
    • CommentAuthorttmartini
    • CommentTimeOct 12th 2011
     
    Thanks for the help guys ya not 100% but think the bike is early 60s it has the old type of cranks with the round spindle and uses a horizontal bolt at the top of the crank arm to secure the arm to the spindle there's no stamps or brand names I can see anywhere, ile dubble check the right cup if not guess ile have yo break down and get sum greese and tear it apart
  3.  
    you have an old cottered crankset. http://sheldonbrown.com/cotters.html you might want to take it to a shop and see if they have a cotter pin press. the fact that you cannot use a standard crank puller will make this a much more complicated process.
    • CommentAuthorthrub
    • CommentTimeOct 12th 2011
     
    Cottered cranks. I might suggest you break down and purchase a pair of cotter pins along with the grease. Italian cotter pins are often 8.5 mm, an odd size, so take the old pins into the shop to confirm. Don't forget to grease the pins and spindle when you reassemble.
  4.  
    Posted By: thrubCottered cranks. I might suggest you break down and purchase a pair of cotter pins along with the grease. Italian cotter pins are often 8.5 mm, an odd size, so take the old pins into the shop to confirm. Don't forget to grease the pins and spindle when you reassemble.


    might as well get some fresh ball bearings while you are at it.
    • CommentAuthorthrub
    • CommentTimeOct 12th 2011
     
    Replacing ball bearings goes without saying. The cups and spindle would be my major concern. Bucks spent replacing them can often cost as much as a sealed bearing so this bike might be a candidate for new cranks unless the cottered cranks merit saving (say, Campagnolo cottered crank).
    • CommentAuthorkumotaki
    • CommentTimeOct 13th 2011 edited
     
    Hey, wouldn't you post some pictures of your bike? It's not everyday that we can see a 60's Bianchi with cottered cranks around here. This sounds like some piece of history. I would go easy on it and have a skilled mechanic check what's really needed.
    • CommentAuthoreaglerock
    • CommentTimeOct 13th 2011
     
    Posted By: kumotakiHey, wouldn't you post some pictures of your bike? It's not everyday that we can see a 60's Bianchi with cottered cranks around here. This sounds like some piece of history. I would go easy on it and have a skilled mechanic check what's really needed.

    I don't know that I would want to ride cottered cranks for anything other than retrofetishist reasons, but you shouldn't necessarily toss them. In a way, they're part of the history of the bike. It'd be a respectful idea to hang onto the crankset and all the bottom bracket bits*, in case you or a future owner wants to build it up just like it originally was. I have an early 60s French bike that came with a cottered BB, so there must have been a cottered crank at some point; I'm hanging onto the BB, just in case.

    Yes, definitely pictures.


    *except the ball bearings - old bearings aren't worth keeping, since you can just replace them with shiny new ones that work better
 
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