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    • CommentAuthorMaxThrash
    • CommentTimeMar 26th 2009
     
    http://www.fixedgeargallery.com/2009/mar/5/FelixSchultz.htm#top

    Entirely made of half-links? Is there an advantage to this?
  1.  
    I think the advantage is being able to show random people and say "look, my chain is made entirely of half links..."

    I've heard people try to argue that they're stronger, but general physicals tells me that a chain that has a bend in every single plate isn't going to be as strong.

    The only real plus, is if you've got a frame with very short dropouts, like the old giordana I used to have that had 1 inch long 45 degree angled dropouts, where you only had a small amount of adjustment, only if you rode a certain gear ratio, a whole chain of half links would mean you only need half as much dropout for proper tension.
  2.  
    The kid also forgot to post a picture of his actual bike, there's just 3 pictures of the chain, and one of the frame still wrapped up, which goes back to my first point of being able to show people that your chain is made of nothing but half links. In this situation, it is obvious that his favorite 75% of the bike is the chain, and the other 25% he likes is the way it was wrapped.
    • CommentAuthoradriano
    • CommentTimeMar 26th 2009
     
    if getting your back tire snug against the seat tube is important, it would be easier with a half link chain.
    • CommentAuthordeermatt
    • CommentTimeMar 27th 2009
     
    Im goinnnnnnnn off the raillllsssss on a crazy chaainnn!!!
    • CommentAuthoradriano
    • CommentTimeMar 27th 2009 edited
     
    Posted By: deermattIm goinnnnnnnn off the raillllsssss on a crazy chaainnn!!!


    Photobucket
  3.  
    If it’s all about looks, then I would say that it looks pretty cool to me, though I hate to think what it cost!
    • CommentAuthorthe rabbi
    • CommentTimeMar 27th 2009
     
    half link chains are loads stronger. they were designed for bmx by shadow conspiracy. cost about $30. mushroomed pins.
    • CommentAuthorjam guy
    • CommentTimeMar 27th 2009
     
    Posted By: upthemaidenI think the advantage is being able to show random people and say "look, my chain is made entirely of half links..."

    I've heard people try to argue that they're stronger, but general physicals tells me that a chain that has a bend in every single plate isn't going to be as strong.

    The only real plus, is if you've got a frame with very short dropouts, like the old giordana I used to have that had 1 inch long 45 degree angled dropouts, where you only had a small amount of adjustment, only if you rode a certain gear ratio, a whole chain of half links would mean you only need half as much dropout for proper tension.


    Your theoretical "physicals" are wrong. Those chains are far stronger than it needs to be for a road bike. The half link chains were made for bmx because they are strong as shit and so you can dial in your rear. Any bike part that is different from the norm must only be made to show off.

    Alright guys I have to go! I have to take my physicals exam!
    • CommentAuthorAaron C
    • CommentTimeMar 27th 2009
     
    +1
  4.  
    So far I've only heard that they're stronger because they have mushroomed pins, and thicker plates. That still has nothing to do with the bend in every plate. You could also use mushroomed pins and thicker plates on a regular chain and get the same benefits, and still not have to deal with the fact that every plate has a kink in it.

    Maybe the reason they had to make those chains so thick, is because they put that bend in the middle of each plate, and they had to make up for it some how.
    • CommentAuthorjam guy
    • CommentTimeMar 27th 2009
     
    Instead of making stupid assumptions why don't you look at the chain. The bend is what makes it a half link. It takes off about a third of the length. When you look at the inside gaps of the links you will notice it is a bit wider. These chains have a tendency to wear rings a bit morevwhen a lot of pedalling is involved. That's why they were not meant for fixed gear applications.
  5.  
    They've been around in BMX for a while. I have one on my BMX and haven't had any troubles. I probably wouldn't trust it on a brakeless fixed gear, but with a brake I'm sure it wouldn't be an issue.
    • CommentAuthorstinky pete
    • CommentTimeMar 27th 2009 edited
     
    Posted By: upthemaidenSo far I've only heard that they're stronger because they have mushroomed pins, and thicker plates. That still has nothing to do with the bend in every plate. You could also use mushroomed pins and thicker plates on a regular chain and get the same benefits, and still not have to deal with the fact that every plate has a kink in it.

    Maybe the reason they had to make those chains so thick, is because they put that bend in the middle of each plate, and they had to make up for it some how.


    I’m no metallurgist, but if the link plates were heat treated after being stamped out and bent to shape before being assembled wouldn’t that make them strong enough to withstand brakeage and/or deformation of the bends?
    I figure if a normal chain design is strong enough for professional race & trick bikes not to brake, then this “half-link chain” design is flawed in some way when applied to the same application, either through excessive weight, lack of strength gain, cost of manufacturing or a combination of these factors. Then there are those who will pay more for something out of the ordinary too.
    Is the chain in question made of some kind of unusual material that is better suited to this design? If it’s made out of the same material as a “normal” bike chain, then I’d say that it is that way because of aesthetics. For example, metal flake paint weighs & costs more than non-flaked paint, but it’s used because some people like the way it looks...

    Also, wouldn’t just one half-link solve the small dropout adjustment area thing?
    • CommentAuthorgreg
    • CommentTimeMar 27th 2009
     
    You guys are great
  6.  
    I'm more than sure enough that the half link chain is strong enough to do what it needs to do. The original question was based around what the purpose of an entire chain made out of half links is for, and even if it is still strong enough, the only real answer is novelty, because yeah, one half link does the same thing as an entire chain of half links
  7.  
    Posted By: gregYou guys are great


    No Greg, YOU’RE great for having this site for us to use!!
  8.  
    Posted By: upthemaidenI'm more than sure enough that the half link chain is strong enough to do what it needs to do. The original question was based around what the purpose of an entire chain made out of half links is for, and even if it is still strong enough, the only real answer is novelty, because yeah, one half link does the same thing as an entire chain of half links


    I agree...
    • CommentAuthorAaron C
    • CommentTimeMar 27th 2009 edited
     
    i totally agree. i dont really see the usefulness of running these on a fixed gear, other than nostalgia for bmx days gone by.
    half links have become pretty much standard issue in a lot of bmx crap too because of how miniscule the dropouts are.
    also i think alot of it has to do with the durability of the chain in general. they are beefy to stand up to the weird impacts involved in riding streets, not so you can whip skid ad nauseam. i've seen some weird stuff happen to chains on bmx bikes and having the pins closer together makes alot of sense if you are feeble grinding down a concrete ledge.
    it also has to do with what works well with 8/9t cassette drivers.
    so unless you are sprocket grinding your fixed gear whats the point.
  9.  
    Posted By: Aaron C on bmx bikes and having the pins closer together makes alot of sense


    The pins are still the same distance, they're all still half an inch apart, whether it's a half link or not, and whether the pins are thicker, beefier, mushroom shaped, or the plates are twice as thick, is all completely irrelevant as far as what type of chain you're using. The pins have no idea what type of chain they're on, the only thing that's different is the shape of the plates. All of the bushings are still the same size as well.
 
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