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    • CommentAuthor2011
    • CommentTimeJun 28th 2011
     
    Posted By: campystampJudging from the size of your bikes, you are a fairly big rider. You probaby need stiffer cranks, possibly frame.


    I second that. You're riding a 60cm frame, with over a foot of seatpost showing. You're clearly a pretty big guy and those mid-range "lightweight" aluminum track bikes are probably not stiff enough for you, especially if skidding or sprinting on the track.

    Probably the main thing I would suggest is going custom, and would suggest a Tiemeyer. They are the stiffest aluminum frames on the market and are still reasonably priced. I ride one and it's probably the stiffest frame I've ever used, even stiffer than my old Cervelo T1.
  1.  
    Posted By: 2011A steel Kilo TT is going to have much more flex than a Mash or something.


    so your saying an aluminum frame can withstand repeated skidding better than a steel frame? And also out of curiosity why the name change?
    • CommentAuthor2011
    • CommentTimeJun 29th 2011
     
    Steel is much more forgiving and can take much more repeated stresses and will return to it's original place. Aluminum on the other hand is stiffer and more brittle, and repeated flexing in an area will potentially cause a crack. A steel frame will have more flex, but can surely handly more abuse than these thin tubing aluminum frames.

    Saying a MASH is stiffer than a Kilo TT was a bad example, because I've owned a Mash, and they are not that stiff of frames. Pushing with slight force on the crank arm, I could see the chainstays flex slightly. You could group all of those similar lightweight aluminum track frames (Mash, Dolan, Pista Concept, Moda, Fuji, etc) as far as stiffness is concerned... they are all about equal.

    The two higher-end dedicated aluminum frame frames I've owned, a Cervelo T1 and my Tiemeyer have had at least double the wall thickness of the tubing, making for a heavier frame (usually around 2,200 grams compared to 1,500), but have been 10x stiffer in the bottom bracket area.

    Assuming this guy does not want to go with a high-end carbon frame, a heftier aluminum frame would be his best bet. Also, having it custom fit for his height and long legs would be a good idea. Clearly stock bike sizes don't fit him too well.
  2.  
    Here is one with a Pista and Campy Record cranks


    https://velospace.org/node/20027
  3.  
    Any one have problems running Omniums on a Bolt frame? I have a 48cm frame and noticed the drive side was rubbing my chain stay, tried using a spacer and that just made the none drive side pop out... I though for sure these would work which is kinda of a bummerville.
  4.  
    You don't need to post in two places to get a response.

    First, yes, you have seen Mash frames running Omniums. That does not mean that they will fit on your Mash.

    Cinelli could have changed something and made the Omnium not clear (the spider is very close on almost any frame). It could also be that your frame is out of whack somehow. The spider or axle on your Omnium could be tweaked. Etc.

    It is the frame if the spider rubs on each of the five arms. It is the crank if it rubs on one or some of the arms, but not all.

    I would suggest against spacing out the Omnium via a bottom bracket spacer. They are not designed to be used with spacers, and you will be better off using a crank which fits correctly from the start.
  5.  
    Posted By: suicide_doorsYou don't need to post in two places to get a response.

    First, yes, you have seen Mash frames running Omniums. That does not mean that they will fit onyourMash.

    Cinelli could have changed something and made the Omnium not clear (the spider is very close on almost any frame). It could also be that your frame is out of whack somehow. The spider or axle on your Omnium could be tweaked. Etc.

    It is the frame if the spider rubs on each of the five arms. It is the crank if it rubs on one or some of the arms, but not all.

    I would suggest against spacing out the Omnium via a bottom bracket spacer. They are not designed to be used with spacers, and you will be better

    off using a crank which fits correctly from the start.


    Right on, yeah sorry about that did not mean to litter the threads I'll keep my posts regulated.

    Thanks for the tips I'll check the frame and cranks tomorrow with what you said in mind.
    • CommentAuthorDinosaur
    • CommentTimeNov 5th 2011
     
    if you can "bend" the arms, maybe you haven't tighten the cranks together tight enough yet.
  6.  
    The Spider is hitting the chainstay (rear triangle) so I think the offset is wrong. I talked to the guys at Mash and they said they have had success using a BB spacer on the drive side, yet my mechanic insists that wont't work, but i think he means a spacer on the crank arm itself which would make sense. So I'll have to check it out again when I see him on Sunday to see what he says. The guy I talked to from the Mash store, said that the rear triangle shouldn't differ from all the other frames. He also said that they had just recently done a 50cm Omnium setup with a frame from the same batch mine was from at there shop not too long ago and that they used a spacer. I'm not sure but I think the spacer on the drive side might be the ticket, should bring the spacing out about 1mm, if that doesn't work I'll have to go with a different set of cranks.
    • CommentAuthorShaku
    • CommentTimeNov 5th 2011
     
    sounds like one of those fuji tracks a while back
  7.  
    Posted By: Shakusounds like one of those fuji tracks a while back


    I thought it might be the Nashbar thing but actually they changed the BB! So it is way slimmer now then it once was, according to another forum member. So yeah I guess for a 68mm bb shell the instructions say to use spacers. Ha!
 
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