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  1.  
    Sell my car and do a cheap as shit build for shitty day commuting? I never take my Track Pro in the rain and would probably buy a Kilo TT or cheap ebay track frame and fit it with Fenders and wide tires and invest on some water proof outer wear. Gas is ridiculous, my car insurance is ridiculous because I'm a terrible driver, my registration renewal is due and it' $50 for another year, my car needs work and I really don't feel like fooling with it. Though not having a car limits me and my immediate family is 80 miles away. I Might do it for a just a year and save a fuck ton of money for not having to spend it on gas, insurance, maintaince, registrations/inspections and get another one later. Just wanted some thoughts from people who do this and what to expect really and whether they really regretted not having a car. I live and work in the city and everything is close and I kinda wanna do it but ehhh....apprehensive...
    • CommentAuthorveggie
    • CommentTimeMay 9th 2011
     
    Is there someplace you can keep the car? Like cancel the insurance and don't re register it, just let it sit dormant while you conduct your experiment.
  2.  
    yes, do it. I don't own a car, dont have a driver's license. No real plans to get either. Life goes on without cars. You'll adapt to carrying your shit with racks and bags etc. My advice: skip the TT and get a geared commuting bike. You'll find you can do so much more, and will use bicycling for many more things.
  3.  
    Yeah I can park it outside, but leaving it outside sitting exposed to the elements for too long just means I'll have to work on more crap to fix it when I decide to use it. If I'm not going to use it I'd rather just sell it. I let my car sit for too long and I needed to flush out the radiator, change the belts from UV damage, for some reason the timing got fucked up to. I needed to drain the fuel system, get a new battery, ugggh. Rather not deal with that again....
  4.  
    Posted By: the fumingatoryes, do it. I don't own a car, dont have a driver's license. No real plans to get either. Life goes on without cars. You'll adapt to carrying your shit with racks and bags etc. My advice: skip the TT and get a geared commuting bike. You'll find you can do so much more, and will use bicycling for many more things.

    I am mostly this way, but being married and having a young kid makes it pretty tough.
    • CommentAuthorveggie
    • CommentTimeMay 10th 2011
     
    Sell it!

    I tell my girlfriend all the time that when we live together I'm gonna try and live mostly without a car, but she doesn't believe me.

    inb4 hoax
  5.  
    Posted By: suicide_doors
    Posted By: the fumingatoryes, do it. I don't own a car, dont have a driver's license. No real plans to get either. Life goes on without cars. You'll adapt to carrying your shit with racks and bags etc. My advice: skip the TT and get a geared commuting bike. You'll find you can do so much more, and will use bicycling for many more things.

    I am mostly this way, but being married and having a young kid makes it pretty tough.

    that is Real Talk tho.
    • CommentAuthortypeDvorak
    • CommentTimeMay 10th 2011
     
    All the money you will be saving on fossil fuels will be spent on carboloading. Think of how much your diet will go up!

    Fooling aside I feel it's an awesome choice. I am doing the same moving from an awesome LA suburb to KCMO for school. I've restored an '82 Univega Gran Rally and parted out my FG commuter in anticipation of this move. Also since they have cold there I built up an ss mtb to be my snow/grocery bike. Cars are dumb and I'm excited to live in a city where everything I need will be within walking and bicycle distance.
    • CommentAuthortypeDvorak
    • CommentTimeMay 10th 2011
     
    (... anticipation for this move.) ?
  6.  
    Boo carbs, yay fat!
  7.  
    This is a bike forum. I am pretty sure most people on here are going to say the same thing: start communting on your bike and save the world and your money.
    • CommentAuthoreaglerock
    • CommentTimeMay 10th 2011 edited
     
    Posted By: the fumingatordont have a driver's license. No real plans to get either.

    Age and location may be a determinant here. I am a lifelong Californian, and I didn't get a license (or a car) until I was 23. My mother forced me to do both, for fear that my kid brother (who worked in a bike shop; we shared a house at the time) would get smacked by a car and need someone to drive him to the hospital. Given the way he rode (on a shit-brown rattlecanned Olmo that he now claims was America's first fixie conversion), it was a reasonable fear.

    I'm remembering the way he dressed. And his cheap-beer-swilling buddies. Hey...my kid brother was a goddamned hipster! In 1985! I should give him shit for that.

    anyway...the real trouble was the lack of a license. Californians treated you like a space alien if you didn't have a license; still do. It's the basic ticket for membership in civilized society. I used to carry around a passport as ID; people would give me the fisheye every time I pulled it out.

    Cars aren't dumb and bikes aren't smart. They're both tools; you use them when you need them. The demonstration of need and my current car/bike balance came on Saturday morning to go to the semi-annual sale at a bike kitchen/charity in Marin. They usually have a lot of pricy swag; Marin County is filled with rich riders that throw their toys away when they're no longer shiny. I got up bright and early, be-coffeed/be-breakfasted myself, dressed, went out to the car, turned the key - nothing. The battery was completely dead, and my neighbor the gypsy mechanic wasn't home to give me a jump (I fix his Macs, he jumps my car, his girlfriend butchers my weed-like trees. We never say anything about it. We've got a nice little socialist thing going on here). I got out of the car, and tried to remember the last time I'd turned the engine over.

    It's been at least a month. Hunh.
    • CommentAuthorSkidMark
    • CommentTimeMay 10th 2011
     
    Keep your car. It rains and snows where you live and eventually the day will come when you'll be sick of being wet and carrying so much shit in your backpack, and you'll think, "I wish I still had my car." Keep your car and only use it when you need it, like to carry a bunch of groceries, or full of your friends, who are also sick of being soaked and living out of a backpack and want a night off.
    • CommentAuthorveggie
    • CommentTimeMay 10th 2011
     
    Posted By: SkidMarkor full of your friends


    This is one of the only reasons I think I could never go completely car-less
    • CommentAuthorper.k
    • CommentTimeMay 10th 2011
     
    Well, speaking from the car-less perspective, I just come baring gifts and my motored friends are cool with it.

    Is it more that you prefer to be the provider veggie?
  8.  
    are you paying for insurance month by month? or do you have to buy six months' worth at a time (sometimes they make you do that if your record is bad)? i think you should keep your driver's license and dump the car once your insurance runs out. there will certainly be times when you regret it, but if "everything is close" as you say you will be able to adapt. if it doesn't work out after six months or a year then you can go back to having a car. make sure you keep track of the money you are saving, that will help you decide whether it is worth the additional effort.

    i would love to not own a car but it just isn't practical for me. southeastern michigan is planned around cars; i'm already in the doghouse because i don't lease a new car every year. i drive as little as possible but sometimes i just have to, the time and space constraints leave no option. all of the benefits of bicycle riding are still available to me even with a car sitting in the driveway. in a real city with real public transportation (and real traffic) it could work but ann arbor is not a real city -- it's an overgrown town. they throw down a lot of bike lanes but it's like anywhere else -- you have to be on guard all the time.
    • CommentAuthortypeDvorak
    • CommentTimeMay 10th 2011
     
    I'm feeling that cars are pretty useless to the student who lives near or on a 4year university. It's a point where I don't need to be locked in to gripe-about-car-specific-issues game like petrol prices and insurance. All the schools I've been to visit are in college-centric parts of town where one could walk to and from class, living, and shopping. My little brother for example goes to UCLA and lives in Westwood. He does everything he needs on a Target bought schwinn mtb and commutes an hour east to hang out on the weekends maybe twice a month on his Motorcycle.
    Where will you be living and what will be your priorities? I use a car because my friends all live far away. I commute into the city by car or train to go on group rides most weekends. I work on campus so I'm going to school six days out of the week, sometimes going home for a nap or lunch at a 34m round trip. Distance is a problem but I can't help it.

    Is a Motorcycle an option? Public transport?
    • CommentAuthorrollins
    • CommentTimeMay 10th 2011
     
    Posted By: typeDvorakI'm feeling that cars are pretty useless to the student who lives near or on a 4year university. It's a point where I don't need to be locked in to gripe-about-car-specific-issues game like petrol prices and insurance. All the schools I've been to visit are in college-centric parts of town where one could walk to and from class, living, and shopping.


    True point.

    In Florida, you can generally ride year round without any issues - though there are some days when storms are so bad you would be a fool to commute on bike. Primary issue for myself is that I don't work at my desk all the time - I have to run errands, I have to make meetings, I have to travel across town...this would not work if I only used a bicycle, unfortunately.

    For a college student though...it would be a no brainer right?

    I didn't pick up if Alex was in college or not.
  9.  
    Great idea for 3 seasons of nice weather, but I would consider making such a choice in January when it's cold, snowing or raining. The convenience is worth it to me- and buying a good car is a PIA. I put gas in my car for the second time since christmas this weekend, but i need it once or twice a month to travel out of state or make a big shopping run (i get 40-50mpg with an old diesel Jetta on B20). I did the math with rental/carshares and I would save something like 150-200/year. Thought about ditching the car and getting the motorcycle back on the road , but the only reasons I don't bike (snow/ice heavy rain) are the same reasons I wouldn't ride the motorcycle.
    Activists check out John Francis and be humbled- he didn't ride in a motorized vehicle for 20+ years and maintained a vow of silence for 17: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Francis_%28environmentalist%29
    I saw him perform a few years ago -blew my mind!
    • CommentAuthorLaurenEE
    • CommentTimeMay 10th 2011
     
    I was in a similar situation to you, and I got rid of my car about two years ago. I was sick of stressing about my sketchy car and paying for expensive repairs on a total POS (1995 Ford Escort). I live in perhaps one of the most inconvienient places to not have a car. There is nothing close because I live on an island. My commute is about 25 miles each way. I ride my bike and take the bus. I don't regret my decision, and if you live in a city you will seriously be fine. And yes, you will probably save a lot of money, I did. I personally wouldn't get a kilo or any track bike to commute on.
 
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