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    • CommentAuthorquixoticle
    • CommentTimeDec 8th 2010 edited
     
    Greetings all,

    the intent of this thread is two-fold. On one hand I am asking this question totally for my own benefit, but then also to present a general space for others to seek advice and to weigh-in on the idea of a lighter ride in terms of urban fixed/ss biking, and to present techniques for achieving such an end.
    • CommentAuthormeatman
    • CommentTimeDec 8th 2010
     
    Posted By: quixoticleurban fixed/ss biking



    haha, I love this!!


    you can only go so far with weight.... you have to have all the necessary components to have a ride-able bike. if you want a lighter bike, replace all your components with lighter weight ones. You also have to think about strength as well, and typically components that are "lighter" and/or "stronger" are also more expensive.
  1.  
    Why do you want to lighten a bike that is more or less a constant theft target commuter that has to deal with u locks, multiple weather elements, and poor road conditions?
    • CommentAuthorpolitburo
    • CommentTimeDec 8th 2010
     
    Lose weight, fatty.
    • CommentAuthormeatman
    • CommentTimeDec 8th 2010
     
    I didn't even look at your bike before...... first thing if you wanna cut weight, get rid of those wheels
  2.  
    Some simple ways to remove some weight off your bike, without spending tons of money on high-end carbon parts is to cut down the length of your seatpost so only a few inches go into your frame. Leave enough to adjust for changes in your saddle, pedals, shoes, etc.

    Secondly, lighter tires and tubes will remove weight where it matters most. Ditch the thick heavy tubes and tires, and get a real nice quality set of lightweight road tires with a vector puncture resistant layer, such as Continental Grand Prix 4000s. Pair them with the Continental Race Light tubes, and you're probably shave close to 1/2 pound off your wheels alone.

    If you're just street riding, you can go down to a smaller chainring and cog to give you the same ratio. It will also shorter your chain, removing a bit of weight there. Also, a good quality, hollow-pin/hollow link chain like a KMC would save a few grams and not sacrifice any strength.
    • CommentAuthorNash
    • CommentTimeDec 8th 2010
     
    t_o pretty much hit it on the head. for your particular bike, you wont be able to do much unless you change all of your components out for weight weenie components. You have a big steel frame with beefy wheels. Look on the plus side, if you ever build a light weight bike you be extry fast!
  3.  
    take a shit before you go ride and don't bring water.
  4.  
    Posted By: politburoLose weight, fatty.


    If you want your bike to be lighter listen to t_o. If you want to decrease the amount of weight you're moving around (read: save energy while riding) listen to politburo. Losing 2 pounds of fat will be way cheaper than losing 2 pounds of bike.
  5.  
    Your IRO frame is heavy as hell too
    • CommentAuthorwes m.
    • CommentTimeDec 8th 2010
     
    Rims. Most people dont need deep section rims, especially in the front. Rotational weight is a mf'er.
    • CommentAuthordape
    • CommentTimeDec 9th 2010
     
    "to weigh-in on" nice pun!

    But seriously, wes m. is right. one thing I've done is replace my front wheel with something significantly lighter. One of my bikes has a Campy Shamal front wheel which has significantly less spokes (16), a lighter road (low-flanged hub) and yet is still deep sectioned. It is also designed for tubular tires which again cuts weight. There is a world of difference between riding with it and riding with my old deep v with high flange hub and 32 straight gauge spokes wheel on the front. The way I see it, the back wheel you are actually using to generate momentum, the front wheel you are always just pushing around. Campy stuff is kind of expensive so you could just try something with a box rim and less spokes for starters.
  6.  
    How much does your bike weigh? Let's say it's 16 lbs. How much do you weigh? Let's say you're 175.

    To reduce the weight of your bike by a pound, you'll have to switch to some lower profile rims. That'll cut a few ounces. Titanium cranks and seat rails will shave a touch. Ultimately, though, to lose the last few ounces, you'll probably need to swap for a carbon frame, anyway.

    ... or you could ride an extra couple of miles a day and bring yourself down to 174.
    • CommentAuthorthe rabbi
    • CommentTimeDec 10th 2010 edited
     
    Posted By: dape"to weigh-in on" nice pun!

    But seriously, wes m. is right. one thing I've done is replace my front wheel with something significantly lighter. One of my bikes has a Campy Shamal front wheel which has significantly less spokes (16), a lighter road (low-flanged hub) and yet is still deep sectioned. It is also designed for tubular tires which again cuts weight. There is a world of difference between riding with it and riding with my old deep v with high flange hub and 32 straight gauge spokes wheel on the front. The way I see it, the back wheel you are actually using to generate momentum, the front wheel you are always just pushing around. Campy stuff is kind of expensive so you could just try something with a box rim and less spokes for starters.
    that's kinda funny because one of those shamal rims weighs ~700g. Cutting spokes in half does a number, but not to the point that it'll make up a 200g (almost 1/2lb) difference. I had a da 7710 to veep 32h/3x w/dt comps that weighed LESS than my friend's shamal front wheel by 60g. 90% of the benefits you get from lower weight components are mental. You think these new awesome wheels are going to climb like they belong to a schleck bro and sure, the lighter weight will be marginally helpful. But if you think you're climbing faster, you're likely to push yourself harder.

    *that's not to say I don't want a pair of HED Stinger 6s. 1lb weight savings, aerodynamic, and stiff as balls? Sign me up PLZ.
    • CommentAuthorrkd350z
    • CommentTimeDec 10th 2010
     
    easiest/Cheapest way is to go on a Diet

    have you heard about going on diet?

    you can use Carbon components and spend $$$
    or
    you can simply go on a diet, spend less on your meal and loose some weight.

    I'm a car guy, and I think it's funny when people put CF hoods and bucket seats to lighten their car when they are fukin 250Ibs burger belly dragracer

    they could've lost at least 50ibs from their belly
    • CommentAuthorwes m.
    • CommentTimeDec 10th 2010
     
    Oh cyclists and their skinny fetish... Random tangent...

    Most fixed/ss riders would benefit more by putting a barbell on their back and gaining some lean mass. Most riders are even weaker than they are fat. Squats, deads, power cleans, lunges, etc. Recently I began the Starting Strength program and damn, its an eye opener.
    • CommentAuthorpeazweag
    • CommentTimeDec 11th 2010
     
    YET ANOTHER STUPID POINTLESS THREAD
    • CommentAuthorcjpark86
    • CommentTimeDec 11th 2010
     
    Lose weight ^^
    • CommentAuthorf64
    • CommentTimeDec 12th 2010 edited
     
    Either lose weight or spend hundreds/thousands to lighten up with c/f components w/ ti specifics / tubulars / etc

    Why do you want a light ss/fixed ?
    They're meant for the track and usually with light bikes on the road, it's more meant for climbing.

    For riding on the velo, I prefer steel to maintain speed consistency.

    Too much "deadspots" while climbing and horrible geometry for street on fixed if it's recreational / everyday
    • CommentAuthorP A U L
    • CommentTimeDec 12th 2010
     
    take a 1/8" drill bit to your frame.
    if your riding thread-less, pull off all of your spacers, and cut your steerer tube down.
    radially lace your wheels.
    hollow link chain.
    cut your seat post down.
    take your bar wrap off (if applicable)
    change your gear ratio to something significantly lower.

    i prefer a light bike, in my case i don't do any tricks, and i don't go off curbs, just a long daily commute, my bike is 19 pounds and i'm still shaving stuff off, . don't particularly like carbon, mostly because of the flex, when im climbing hills.

    good luck, and don't cut you seatpost too short.
 
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