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    • CommentAuthorurchin0903
    • CommentTimeDec 15th 2010 edited
     
    really so having enough self worth not to eat something on the level of the kind of things the people handing it out would normally throw out makes them undeserving of charity? ever seen or ate day old burritos? and i mean with real tortillas and beans? even with a fridge they dont last and get funky quick. good to know you see yourself as a future philanthropist so you have the total know all of what charity is and who should be helped
  1.  
    Posted By: urchin0903really so having enough self worth not to eat something on the level of the kind of things the people handing it out would normally throw out makes them undeserving of charity? ever seen or ate day old burritos? and i mean with real tortillas and beans? even with a fridge they dont last and get funky quick. good to know you see yourself as a future philanthropist so you have the total know all of what charity is and who should be helped


    Someone needs to chill out before they decide to write things on the internet. Yes I have eaten a day old burritos before (made with REAL tortillas and REAL beans). I'm not advocating giving people food thats unfit to for consumption, nor am I saying that those who are less fortunate shouldn't be helped simply because they are ungrateful. Whether someone deserves help and whether someone should be helped are different things. Try not to put words in other people's mouths or make rash character judgments based on a few internet posts (one of which was a joke). If you really want to know my opinions and or engage in any sort of reasonable dialogue in order to understand how I actually feel about the subject (since you seem some interest about the topic) PM me.

    Anyways... lighter bicycles...
    • CommentAuthorwes m.
    • CommentTimeDec 15th 2010
     
    One time I was complaining about a homeless guy who refused a sandwich on the grounds that he was a vegetarian. He was panhandling in front of a subway restaurant so a lady assumed he was hoping to score a sandwich, she was wrong, the homeless dude was really rude about it. A person who heard my complaining came up to me and said that homeless have little to no control over most aspects of their lives (because of a lack of resources/mental illness/whatever) and that the homeless guy was probably exercising what little control he had to pick and choose his food by refusing the sandwich.

    That made me feel bad so I shut up.

    The point here is that unless you guys have been homeless you probably dont know what the hell you are talking about and you should stop arguing about crappy burritos. That goes for both sides.
  2.  
    I had a box of beef jerky and I offered it to a homeless man and he said no I cannot have it, I have a broken jaw.
    • CommentAuthorurchin0903
    • CommentTimeDec 15th 2010
     
    homeless no but i have lived in a ukrainian state funded orphanage
  3.  
    I've given a lot of food to homeless people. Sometimes they don't want it. Sometimes they do. I can't help everybody, but I can help someone when their need matches up with my ability to help. That's what these hipster kids are doing: they have a way to offer some help. They offer it to people who want it. Saying that they should do more, while you lie on your couch and complain on the Internet about their douchey fashion sense, is kinda dumb.
  4.  
    Posted By: Joshua A.C. NewmanI've given a lot of food to homeless people. Sometimes they don't want it. Sometimes they do. I can't help everybody, but I can help someone when their need matches up with my ability to help. That's what these hipster kids are doing: they have a way to offer some help. They offer it to people who want it. Saying that they should do more, while you lie on your couch and complain on the Internet about their douchey fashion sense, is kinda dumb.


    the complaining you describe is dumb, i agree. what i would say to these kids, if i had the opportunity, i that what you're doing is a good idea, you should do it more often, and by the way you could probably get a lot more done if you didn't devote so much effort to self-promotion. maybe it is less effort than it looks, maybe it is a generational thing, but the people i know who are really doing this kind of thing aren't photographing each other in the process. i just find the narcissism to be an off-flavor. it's like it's all about them, and if someone gets a meal then that's just, like, a positive externality.

    speaking of flavor, the döner kebap is much closer to the gyros sandwich, which is more entrenched in this area than the burrito. and don't forget shwarma!
  5.  
    They lighten up their bikes by loading the burritos along with their bikes on a truck
    • CommentAuthorquixoticle
    • CommentTimeDec 19th 2010 edited
     
    So, I've decided that I want to build up a track-specific bike over the course of the next few months (selling a few items to free up some cash, such as a '75 Fender Mustang, 56cm Raleigh Sports 3-speed among other things, if anyone is interested) - are there any suggestions as to what would be a good mid-level aluminum track frame to look into buying? I see that Cinelli Mashes and Bianchi Pista Concepts seem the more fashionable choices in this category, but are there better framesets out there that perform comparably/better? Or, perhaps a Road Bike proper would be a better (read: more practical) choice - so, in that case, what would be a decent mid-level Road Bike I might look into? Or I suppose I could go bother people at one of the many LBS's around here, whatevs.

    Once again, I really appreciate anyone who takes the time to spread some knowledge, as I'm really changing my own life around here as far what physical limitations I now have to work around, and I think cycling is the answer. Thanks bros.
  6.  
    titanium spokes.
    • CommentAuthorveggie
    • CommentTimeDec 19th 2010 edited
     
    Posted By: quixoticleOr, perhaps a Road Bike proper would be a better (read: more practical) choice - so, in that case, what would be a decent mid-level Road Bike I might look into?


    For getting exercise, I would like to say a road bike would be more practical(I feel like someone is going to shoot me over this one). As for suggestions, no one can really give you any without a budget, but why don't you do what you were gonna do with the track bike and build it over the course of a few months?
  7.  
    There is nothing practical riding a track bike for any type of street use but everyone does it including me ;] but I would say if you want an entry level mid range track bike take a look at the Felt Tk3 for $800 you can haz sexy biek.
    • CommentAuthoreaglerock
    • CommentTimeDec 19th 2010 edited
     
    Posted By: quixoticleOnce again, I really appreciate anyone who takes the time to spread some knowledge, as I'm really changing my own life around here as far what physical limitations I now have to work around, and I think cycling is the answer. Thanks bros.

    I suspect that this should really be the start of a new thread (which you can do, of course), 'cause it's not really about lightenizing a bike; but anyway...

    If you've got physical limitations of some kind, it'll help to know what they are. We've got people here who are gimped up in all kinds of ways: Really big guys, really small guys, really heavy guys, people with visual and hearing problems, people who've been in accidents that resulted in joint problems, people with nerve damage, people with chronic illnesses and whatnot. The proper bike to get yourself around on without making a bad situation worse may be different, depending on what your situation is.

    For example, if you've got a lot of joint problems (knees and hips especially), I'd guess that fixed gear is not the way to go, since you put more stress on those joints when you brake. At the same time, if you need to build muscle mass in your quads and calves (say, if you've had some kind of tissue damage and you need to flush a lot of blood through the circuits to keep the remaining tissue healthy), fixed gear is probably the best option because you have to keep moving your legs.

    What problem are you trying to solve? What's your goal, and what's your timeframe and budget for achieving that goal?
    • CommentAuthorquixoticle
    • CommentTimeDec 19th 2010 edited
     
    to eaglerock: well, as far as damage is concerned, i was involved in a car accident two years ago that left me with two severely herniated discs, which, as time progressed, did not grow back and were in fact wearing away. this summer i had two artificial discs inserted into my spine to fix this problem before it got worse, etc. as a person who used to run about 70 miles a week, i have been unable to get myself back on track physically for the past 2 years, and have been wasting away, unable to do much more than walk or ride a stationary bike, etc. i bought myself this IRO Angus over the summer for getting around as well as helping me build up muscles and stretch-out my nerves/tendons (i am almost 2 inches taller than i was pre-op) in yet another way, complementing my other efforts at rehab, conducted in the gym, etc. also, in about 2 years i'll be moving back home from NYC where i go to school, where i'll actually have access to a track in the area - and a better and wider array of roads, for that matter. my goal is to be able to do PT in a way similar to how i used to, that is, bare bones and 6 times a week for over an hour at a time. so, i suppose i am looking for something that would let me train on the street mostly, though i'm really attracted to the experience of riding fixed gear, though i guess this is ideological on my part, as i used to take a similar approach to running (tried barefoot, ate paleo, was pretty much a pretentious asshole...) budget is virtually not really a question if i pace myself, though i'd be able to make purchases of a bout 500 dollars at a time without breaking bank. i really feel like i can be serious about biking in the way that i used to be about running.
    • CommentAuthorthe rabbi
    • CommentTimeDec 20th 2010
     
    Use your iro on the track and buy a road bike. If you're fast on the road, you'll easily be fast on the track. If you're fast on the track, it doesn't mean as much as you would think on the road (except you'll have one hell of a sprint). You should really just save up a few of those $500 purchases and buy a complete bike. Cannondale has an amazing offering of a cad10 with new shimano 105 (5700 series) for like $1300. And it's almost lighter than my full crabon bike.
    • CommentAuthorquixoticle
    • CommentTimeDec 20th 2010
     
    sounds good. thank you, rabbi!
    • CommentAuthorf64
    • CommentTimeDec 20th 2010 edited
     
    You can find used Calfee Tetra Pro's / Luna's for around 1200 ( complete ) and I gotta say that my Tetra Pro (sold) was one of my favorite.
    • CommentAuthorVama
    • CommentTimeJan 5th 2011
     
    damn, I was gonna make some catty comments but it seems you guys stopped being as bitchy! ... I have to replace the rear wheel on one of my bikes, and am currently thinking about where to focus, in terms of strength and weight, on a veeeeeeeeeerrrrrryyyy low budget. sad to say it, but yes, looks do matter to me, but not to the extent that I would cripple myself. I like form and function to complement each other!
    • CommentAuthorveggie
    • CommentTimeJan 5th 2011
     
    Posted By: Vamadamn, I was gonna make some catty comments but it seems you guys stopped being as bitchy! ... I have to replace the rear wheel on one of my bikes, and am currently thinking about where to focus, in terms of strength and weight, on a veeeeeeeeeerrrrrryyyy low budget. sad to say it, but yes, looks do matter to me, but not to the extent that I would cripple myself. I like form and function to complement each other!


    So what exactly are you asking? a good wheel at a good price?
    • CommentAuthorVama
    • CommentTimeJan 5th 2011
     
    I suppose so, yeah. :) tossing ideas around in my head. just kind of my at-the-moment bike dilemma, not really a serious question I was asking. really it's a matter of strength vs. weight - I like having a light bike but I do encounter times being at war with the cars that I have to make small jumps offa curbs to get out of their way, etc... but definitely not tricking or anything like that. I'm curious how much of my perception of aero rims being stronger are correct. I haven't had any box rims get trashed, but I do have several friends who true their wheels way more than I do and they all ride box rims. then again, I have a front aero rim that needs to be trued ATM cuz some jackass pulled a left turn without signaling in an intersection that we were both going thru and smacked my front wheel and sent me flying a good 15 feet.
 
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