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    • CommentAuthorthe rabbi
    • CommentTimeMar 10th 2009
     
    Posted By: deermattA brake is probably safer , if you know what your doing . Ive heard several cases of people going over the handle bars after using the brake on their track bikes. Im saying its not as easy to skid on a conversion cause your riding position isnt the same.
    they probably pulled their brake too hard.
    on a track bike you're more over the front of the bike. that might make it a tad easier.
    but all that really matters in how hard it is to skid is your leg strength and your gear inches.
  1.  
    Posted By: deermattA brake is probably safer , if you know what your doing . Ive heard several cases of people going over the handle bars after using the brake on their track bikes. Im saying its not as easy to skid on a conversion cause your riding position isnt the same.


    well, that was my point mainly, that it is safer regardless because you said it was better for me to have a brake. i think its better for everyone. skidding is just a poor form of stopping, its simple physics. but how exactly does your orientation on a track bike make for an easier skid? i understand the basic differences in frame geometry but none seem to really yield an easier skid in my mind. could you explain the differences in geometry and how it makes it easier? maybe explain how your orientation yields an easier skid? also, what track frames exactly?
    • CommentAuthortangsuto
    • CommentTimeMar 10th 2009
     
    well, that was my point mainly, that it is safer regardless because you said it was better for me to have a brake. i think its better for everyone. skidding is just a poor form of stopping, its simple physics. but how exactly does your orientation on a track bike make for an easier skid? i understand the basic differences in frame geometry but none seem to really yield an easier skid in my mind. could you explain the differences in geometry and how it makes it easier? maybe explain how your orientation yields an easier skid? also, what track frames exactly?


    In regards to the skidding in relation to the geometry of a bike, I think as the rabbi pointed out, you're more over the front of the bike on some track frames (either flat top tubes, or forward-slanting top tubes). This makes it a lot easier to unweight the rear wheel to initiate the skid or skip. Compare this to say a mountain bike frame, where you're oriented more down and back on the frame (backwards slanting top tube).

    My take on the whole stopping a fixed gear bike--much like what you yourself said in the "want-to-be fixies" thread, people's reasoning for riding a bike or in this case how they stop a fixed gear is up to them. You shouldn't waste your time bothering with other people's opinions on the matter or wasting your time trying to convince others of yours. Everyone has their own riding and stopping style and are used to doing things that way. So the stopping distance is shorter with a brake, but know that for most stops or slowing down a brake isn't needed, just leg power to back pedal. For emergency stops, sometimes it's best not to stop at all but to swerve around. My point is just to know that there are adaptations in each style of stopping.

    I personally do not ride my fixed gear with a brake, just my personal choice and what I am used to. Would I mind riding with a brake? Not at all. I just found myself not using the brake as much and eventually just took it off. I also ride mountain bikes on trails in my area, and trust me I use a brake. There is no clear black or white answer. Bottom line, do what is most comfortable and what you feel is best for you. Just because you learn how to skid, doesn't mean you have to use it.

    Good luck and be safe out there spacerockkid.
  2.  
    right on! safety is first. i just dont see having a brake on there as taking anything away from my bike. i mean, what? its a few grams of weight? and even though its on there, i still slow with my legs as well, this is one of the many things i really enjoy about riding fixed. but you are right, to each their own. i just hope you know what you are doing! its sad to hear guys getting seriously hurt all in the sake keeping their precious street cred (not referring to you of course). hehe, it almost seems like a rite of passage here in my city to try and bomb all the big hills without a brake only to end up in the back of an ambulance! thats another thing i said before, its based on terrain. im tackling some huge monster hills around where i live, so skidding would just be pointless. id do more skidding then rolling. but if you feel comfortable in your hood without a brake, thats cool.

    and honestly, just like on the other thread, i feel like theres a lot of hostility and most of it comes out of this elitist type of attitude. its like, as soon as some track bike elitist comes up to my bike and sees drop outs, old shifter bosses and a front brake, they turn their nose up at me. or of course, my favorite, the old school vintage road bike elitist who is mad because i found my bike before he did! even this whole "oh you probably need a brake for your conversion" comment. i know track frames are different in geometry, i have done my homework but im pretty sure you can skid just the same on my reynolds 501 than you can on any other bike. like rabbi said, its the strength of the riders legs.

    again, i just think it is funny because their seems like a lot of misinformation and elitist type boasting and hating going around. i really just try and combat that and really stand up for the people like myself, who may have actually gotten into the fixed gear scene with rather honest and sincere intentions that actually ENJOY bikes, not use them as a fashion accessory or means in which to put everyone down. honestly, i am just really fascinated by these bikes. its great sharing and talking with so many different people about them. gosh, i just wish there was more respect and a little less contempt. not EVERYONE whos new to fixed gears is trying to up their street cred with the local hipster circles or become the next lance armstrong, you know what i mean? i ride cause its fun and interesting, not cause its trendy and unlike most, i study and do the most homework i can on it!
    • CommentAuthortangsuto
    • CommentTimeMar 11th 2009
     
    I totally agree with your mentality and attitude for riding bikes. I've mentioned before, just do your thing and don't let the haters keep you down.
  3.  
    my surly came with a front brake and for the first year i would not take it off. i learned to skid on wet grass too. then when i got comfortable i would use the smooth concrete of a garage floor. one time i got too close to a car and slammed the front brake and almost flipped over the bars. trust me dont slam the brake mid skid! i knew the steamroller was halfway road geo. and half track geo. so i understand how on a traditional track frame with its geometry, you mos def are over the front bars more, so naturally you dont have to un-weight the back tire as much as on a road geometry. my gearing is 47x19. i recently took off the brake and im still never 100% confident about my skidding to a stop if i needed to, which is why i plan ahead and im aware of dangerous sections of the street where cars come out from garages and shit without lookin for bikes. i know plenty of cool people who ride a brake. they know how to skid better than me but they just decided that safety is better than "trying"to look cool. but lately there is a surge of all these young kids who ride brakeless and they are new to the whole thing and they hate on kids with brakes, when they themselves really dont know a whole lot. my buddy has been riding fixed in SF for years used to ride brakeless now he rides with one.
  4.  
    Just make sure you ride safe when you don't have any brakes. Don't just haul ass down any road cause you never know what can happen so try and anticipate random idiots on the road. Once some car made a left Uturn without signals while I was to her left and almost hit me. I was lucky enough that skidding was sufficient enough to avoid hitting her, so just be careful. Definitely brakes if you're not super comfortable with skidding yet.
    • CommentAuthorSNEK
    • CommentTimeMay 13th 2010
     
    all u have to do is switch your gearing. go 44 18. ive been riding for three years and after trying out lots of diff. combos this works the best. its easy to skid and climb hills. 52 16 is a rediculous ratio for the street and should be left for the track.
    • CommentAuthorMANNY E
    • CommentTimeMay 13th 2010
     
    Pretty much I did my first one out of pure fright. Basically I saw a car run the ol stale yellow light in front of me and i almost soiled my work clothes a lil bit, and cranked back right on a "sweet spot" and averted danger. I was cruisin with no brake because I got a flat the day before, and smoked some suberb shiz and din't get around to puttin the bitch back on. Take your front brake off sometimes in the rain and go fuck around man. That's your best bet.
    BTW 46/16 ratio is pretty dope if you commute less than 5 or 6 miles and try to skid in front of traffic.
    • CommentAuthordas_pyrate
    • CommentTimeMay 14th 2010
     
    umm this thread is a year old guys
    • CommentAuthorgreg
    • CommentTimeMay 14th 2010
     
    1.5 yrs actually
    • CommentAuthorSkidMark
    • CommentTimeMay 14th 2010
     
    Balls meet stem. Stem, balls. Balls, stem.
    • CommentAuthorwes m.
    • CommentTimeMay 15th 2010
     
    Cheesus guys, this dude has probably already quit riding bikes by now.
 
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