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  1.  
    Hey, new here. :) I was wondering if there is any advantages/disadvantages if the heavier of the two wheels is in the back/front. Also, what do you prefer? Just trying to get some help before I buy a new wheelset. Thanks! :)
  2.  
    It's easier to pull weight up a hill than push it.

    Just sayin.
  3.  
    The actual difference in weight is teeny. If you weigh 175 lbs and your bike weighs 25, how far forward or back a few grams are isn't going to make much impact on your 200 lbs.
    • CommentAuthormeatman
    • CommentTimeOct 12th 2010
     
    Posted By: brooklynbombsIt's easier to pull weight up a hill than push it.

    Just sayin.



    agreed! I guess the obvious comes to mind.... if your gonna have one heavier than the other, why in the world would you want it on the front?

    just sayin
    • CommentAuthorwes m.
    • CommentTimeOct 12th 2010
     
    Since a heavier wheel is usually a stronger wheel its probably best to have it in the rear.

    On an entirely theoretical level... Your front wheel travels further than your rear wheel so an increase in front wheel weight would have more impact than an increase in rear wheel weight.
  4.  
    What's the difference in weight we're talking about here?
  5.  
    with wheels things are abit different than any part on your bike, you have to spin that wheel not push

    having lighter wheels with easy rolling tires will be better for accelerating, climbing hills and slowling if your on a fixed gear

    heavy wheels will help you keep momemtom on flats or down hill making it easier to keep your speed, but again if your fixed the heavier the wheel oviusly harder it is to slow it

    personaly with a fixed gear and with alot of hills around me and having to stop and start often i would want the lightest wheels i could get, and with a roadbike id be the same
    • CommentAuthorheadphone
    • CommentTimeOct 13th 2010 edited
     
    Posted By: Joshua A.C. NewmanThe actual difference in weight is teeny. If you weigh 175 lbs and your bike weighs 25, how far forward or back a few grams are isn't going to make much impact on your 200 lbs.


    rotational weight matters...or at least that the conventional wisdom or understanding of physics.

    I prefer wheels that are as light as I can go without compromising durability in the particular application.
    • CommentAuthorRuffinit
    • CommentTimeOct 13th 2010
     
    Posted By: wes m.Since a heavier wheel is usually a stronger wheel its probably best to have it in the rear.

    All true, but on the simplest level and for most intents and purposes, Wes is right on. Because we don't know the way a particular cyclist rides, the heavier wheels will be more beneficial on the rear which is where the majority of the weight is concentrated.
  6.  
    Posted By: headphone
    Posted By: Joshua A.C. NewmanThe actual difference in weight is teeny. If you weigh 175 lbs and your bike weighs 25, how far forward or back a few grams are isn't going to make much impact on your 200 lbs.


    rotational weight matters...or at least that the conventional wisdom or understanding of physics.

    I prefer wheels that are as light as I can go without compromising durability in the particular application.


    Of course. But we're talking about two given rims, and one is heavier. They have the same rotational mass because they're both rotating at the same speed.
    • CommentAuthorquidose
    • CommentTimeOct 13th 2010
     
    Posted By: Ruffinit
    Posted By: wes m.Since a heavier wheel is usually a stronger wheel its probably best to have it in the rear.

    All true, but on the simplest level and for most intents and purposes, Wes is right on. Because we don't know the way a particular cyclist rides, the heavier wheels will be more beneficial on the rear which is where the majority of the weight is concentrated.


    Is this why many non-disc triathalon bikes have a deeper section wheel in the rear?
    • CommentAuthorwes m.
    • CommentTimeOct 13th 2010
     
    I think disc/deeper rear wheels are more common in the rear because of aerodynamics. The rear wheel doesnt turn so it catches less crosswind. I've been told that no one uses a disc/deeper front because of crosswind while turning. I could be completely off on this though.

    Based on the tri people I have met I find it hard to believe that they would make any decision based on something as practical as durability.
    • CommentAuthorRuffinit
    • CommentTimeOct 13th 2010
     
    The disc or deeper V rim for the rear wheel of a TRI or TT bike is because it isn't as susceptible to cross winds as the front wheel; this is called "sail area". With a disc or deep V front wheel the wind will catch it and causes steering or control problems. Now while this isn't a huge deal for control when in a TRI or TT because these are usually non-team or individual races; if you have to fight the crosswind for control of the steering you are not able to relax your body while riding leading to premature fatigue. On calm days these riders may opt for disks front and rear. It's really got nothing to do with the strength of the rim in these applications. You want to maintain as much aero advantage as you can while maintaining control of your ride.
  7.  
    It has been proven that you actually get more aero benefit out of riding a front disc, than a rear disc. However, unless you're riding an indoor track, no one is really going to risk riding a front disc. The benefits or riding a rear disc over a deep section rim are really not THAT great, as far as aerodynamics is concerned. I was told by many of the Cat 1 and Elite/Master racers at my local track that riding a rear disc is pretty much just for the stiffness and strength. It's not going to make you any faster.

    I've ridden both heavy aluminum box rims, lightweight carbon V rims and deep carbon wheels on the track during races. No actual difference in my times or performance could be noted.

    However, I do notice a slight difference in my ability to climb the big hills around town when I have on my carbon wheels with light tires, compared to aluminum rims with wider, heavier tires.
    • CommentAuthorheadphone
    • CommentTimeOct 14th 2010
     
    Posted By: Joshua A.C. Newman
    Posted By: headphone
    Posted By: Joshua A.C. NewmanThe actual difference in weight is teeny. If you weigh 175 lbs and your bike weighs 25, how far forward or back a few grams are isn't going to make much impact on your 200 lbs.


    rotational weight matters...or at least that the conventional wisdom or understanding of physics.

    I prefer wheels that are as light as I can go without compromising durability in the particular application.


    Of course. But we're talking about two given rims, and one is heavier. They have the same rotational mass because they're both rotating at the same speed.


    what?
  8.  
    The question is not whether to use heavier or lighter wheels. That's obvious.

    The question is whether the heavier one goes in front or back. I'm saying that rotational mass doesn't matter because you're spinning the same mass either way, and the overall difference it weight distribution must be tiny — I bet your hand position and where you are on the saddle has a bigger impact than which wheel is a few grams heavier.
 
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