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    • CommentAuthorbillyalva
    • CommentTimeJul 25th 2010 edited
     
    Carbon Fiber Belt Drives:


    also anyone know when cisco will be making their FGFS bike?: EDIT, oh nevermind its an advertisement for some wireless network thing. Well it still looks like a nice bike regardless.

    • CommentAuthorJbherlihy
    • CommentTimeJul 25th 2010 edited
     
    I know the carbon belt drives exist, trek uses them on one of their new creations. I really wanna ride one, I bet they're nice.

    http://www.trekbikes.com/us/en/bikes/urban/district/district/
    • CommentAuthorbillyalva
    • CommentTimeJul 25th 2010
     
    wtf is up with that dropout, it looks really confusing
    • CommentAuthorMaxThrash
    • CommentTimeJul 25th 2010
     
    I actually saw one of the trek ones. Looks pretty legit, actually.
    • CommentAuthorJbherlihy
    • CommentTimeJul 25th 2010
     
    thats the "crocodile clamping system"...
    • CommentAuthorbillyalva
    • CommentTimeJul 25th 2010
     
    the one on that trek doesnt look like the "pay-tent" pending crocodile clamping system.

    How are these held together? Do they have pins? How come velodrome racers arent using them if they are so much better than traditional chains? How much will this chain cost? Will there be conversion kits available? Will the chain length be variable or will it be only one length? How many miles is 2000 kilometres?

    so many questions
  1.  
    1km = 0.621 miles, so 2000km = about 1,242 miles
    • CommentAuthorbillyalva
    • CommentTimeJul 25th 2010
     
    in that case, it might only be for people who are logging that many miles in a few months, and have a lot of cash to replace it. For the average rider / tarckster that sounds probably like almost a years worth of use.

    How will it hold up against tricks?
    • CommentAuthorwes m.
    • CommentTimeJul 25th 2010
     
    Track racers dont use them because belt drives are only theoretically better than chain drives. The benefits of being silent and maintenance free are obvious benefits for commuters. Those benefits dont mean anything in track racing.
    • CommentAuthorcage
    • CommentTimeJul 25th 2010
     
    I'm pretty sure it is already in production, but not available in the states, just Germany and a few surrounding countries.
    • CommentAuthorbillyalva
    • CommentTimeJul 25th 2010
     
    Posted By: wes m.Track racers dont use them because belt drives are only theoretically better than chain drives. The benefits of being silent and maintenance free are obvious benefits for commuters. Those benefits dont mean anything in track racing.


    yea but its "lighter" and carbon fiber, doesnt that mean it will make the racers go faster
    • CommentAuthorveggie
    • CommentTimeJul 25th 2010
     
    Posted By: billyalvayea but its "lighter" and carbon fiber, doesnt that mean it will make the racers go faster


    Weight isn't everything.
    • CommentAuthorwes m.
    • CommentTimeJul 25th 2010 edited
     
    In UCI sanctioned races, which is most of the important ones other than the grand tours, your bike needs to weigh at least 15lbs. I think that rule applies in the grand tours too. There is almost no point in scrounging for weight savings in race bikes anymore. Half of pro bikes have weights in the seatposts to keep them above the weight limit. Lightness is mostly a marketing point nowadays. The real battle now is in stiffness/power transfer. I'm interested to see some belt vs chain power transfer data.
    • CommentAuthorwyatt183
    • CommentTimeJul 26th 2010
     
    i think a troll is making a bunch of accounts........
  2.  
    The main obstacle to the acceptance of belt drives is that you need a frame with one of those kooky dropouts for it to work.

    That said, a Nexus hub with one of these would be a really sweet commuter.
    • CommentAuthorbillyalva
    • CommentTimeJul 26th 2010
     
    How about the availability of these? What if a chain breaks while commuting, what is one to do?
  3.  
    Same thing you usually do. Walk it. But carrying a spare of one of these belts would be super-easy compared to a chain. They're not sticky or greasy, and they weigh very little. But I'd also bet you'd never break one. After a while, it would wear out and start to skip, and then you'd replace it.
    • CommentAuthorbillyalva
    • CommentTimeJul 26th 2010
     
    No i mean the question is, if you break a regular chain, you might be able to break it at the broken link and just ride with a tighter rear triangle or a tighter deraulleiur. Also, if you are close to a bike shop, you would be able to go there and repair it or get a new one.

    Will this new chain require a different tool to take it apart and adjust the length? Will only a few certain bike shops be able to sell you a new one and replace it, or will the tools carry over?
    • CommentAuthorsmricha2
    • CommentTimeJul 26th 2010
     
    @ billyalva: If you break a belt.... its broken for good... there are no links or means to connect the two ends back together. Think of it as a rubber band... if it breaks... you get a new one. As to your availability question... thats the risk you take with being an early adopter of almost any consumer product. Sure... you're all BMOC cause you got the latest and greatest shiny object, but when it breaks nobody in town knows how to fix it (i.e. SRAM road groups or Shimano Di2). Also, to your earlier question about conversions... will not happen. Your frame has to able to come apart in the rear triangle at some point to allow the belt to slip through since the belt is a continous unbreakable piece. I mean... you could take a hacksaw to your current frame and rig a way to make it work... but only if safety is a low priority to you. Hope this helps
    • CommentAuthorbillyalva
    • CommentTimeJul 26th 2010
     
    thanks, but if its like a rubber band there would be no way to replace it then?

    Also, how would you be able to adjust the length, will you just have to order them in diffrent sizes?
 
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