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    • CommentAuthorjakejazzy
    • CommentTimeMar 19th 2010
     
    Ok so I've been Waching some fixed gear freestyle vids on vimeo, youtube etc, and I'm wondering if anyone out there can answer my question.

    basically I'm wondering what the benefit is of having direct drive whilst riding ramps and street riding etc? to me it seems you have a far greater trick range with a free wheel ie you can level your pedals when you go in to do some thing etc. a lot of the tricks i see seem to be very similar to bmx ones and i think it quite impressive pulling feats on a bike twice the size of a bmx but surely with no free wheel your just putting a barrier between you and a greater trick range.

    hope i have not left myself open to ridicule or anything hah. cheers, jake.
  1.  
    Yeah...you're right. I think tricks should be left to BMX bikes also, just because it's more practical.

    The only advantage that I can think of is that riding a fixed gear, you can pedal the bike backwards. Big woop!
  2.  
    What's that gadget called that allows both freewheeling and backward pedaling? It seems like it might be useful to this crowd.
    • CommentAuthorSkidMark
    • CommentTimeMar 19th 2010
     
    I think that's the point of it, to do tricks with a fixed gear. It does add a degree of difficulty. Unfortunately it also takes some of the "flow" out of the tricks. Obviously the tricks are going to derive from BMX Freestyle, the "sport" had been around for over 25 years, and there are only so many things you can do on a bike. There are (very old) artistic cycling tricks that are old school BMX tricks, and the originators of BMX freestyle were not really aware of artistic cycling (which is performed on a fixed gear bike).

    The advantage is that riding from spot to spot is much less of a chore. Doing that totally sucks on a modern BMX, because you don't really ever sit down, seat is too low. Most BMXers go from spot to spot in a car, at least that is what I used to do.
  3.  
    freecoaster?
    • CommentAuthorSkidMark
    • CommentTimeMar 19th 2010
     
    A freecoaster is the complete opposite of a fixed gear, you can coast forwards and backwards.

    Again the point is doing tricks with a fixed gear.
  4.  
    I think he was responding to JACN's comment.
  5.  
    He was, and I was remembering wrong. I thought it allowed you to pedal or coast backward, but instead it only allows you to coast backward.

    It's still cool, but not relevant here.
    • CommentAuthorSkidMark
    • CommentTimeMar 19th 2010 edited
     
    Basically a freecoaster has a clutch that disengages drive when you backpedal slightly. This allows you to coast when you roll backwards. If it engages while you are rolling backwards, it will cause the bike to backpedal the same way a freewheel does.

    Being able to pedal backward like you can on a fixed gear is what makes the rear wheel spins work (like out of rolling backwards). Fixed gear makes it easier to find and keep the "sweet spot" when doing a wheelie, because if you start to loop you can get back to the balance point by slowing your pedaling instead of using body English, or scrubbing a handbrake. It can also add a jerkiness to maintaining the wheelie so once again not as smooth.
    • CommentAuthorBen Hittle
    • CommentTimeMar 19th 2010
     
    Posted By: terrible_one49Yeah...you're right. I think tricks should be left to BMX bikes also, just because it's more practical.

    The only advantage that I can think of is that riding a fixed gear, you can pedal the bike backwards. Big woop!


    Exactly.
    • CommentAuthorride slow
    • CommentTimeMar 19th 2010
     
    Were is john prolly for this discussion?
    • CommentAuthorride slow
    • CommentTimeMar 19th 2010
     
    You guys are dumb, people can ride whatever bike they have fun on.
    Make fun of people with bright green pista concepts or something.
  6.  
    Posted By: ride slowYou guys are dumb, people can ride whatever bike they have fun on.
    Make fun of people with bright green pista concepts or something.

    Forgive me, but I would love to come home from work and not see Japanese Nazis, homophobes, or non-participatory bitching and shitty attitudes clogging the forums.
  7.  
    As far as my opinion goes, I agree that people can and should ride whatever they want, but 95% of well done fixed tricks look and flow like shit. No matter how much more difficult they are to perform than their BMX or freeride brothers, I am far more interested in seeing a fluid routine or ride filled with combinations of tricks than I am in seeing a dude do one trick, then pedal himself around for half a minute before he can manage to do something else. It's like watching middle school kids learning to skate and doing the same five tricks over and over, crashing 70% of the time. That's just my opinion, and Prolly can do whatever the hell he wants -- it's obviously working for him.
    • CommentAuthorM0THER
    • CommentTimeMar 19th 2010
     
    Posted By: ride slowYou guys are dumb, people can ride whatever bike they have fun on.
    Make fun of people with bright green pista concepts or something.


    What? People on bright green pista concepts don't have fun?! I'M OFFENDED!
  8.  
    Why fixed? Wonka said it best - "one man moving machine". My bike is my transportation, i have always liked doing tricks on whatever was around, be it skateboards, bmx's or a fucking track bike. I don't want to have to have separate bikes for tricks & transportation.

    Also, there is just something different and addictive about riding fixed. Assuming that you guys ride your bikes, you know what im talking about. I don't like the feeling of a bike that coasts, it's like i'm less in control.

    When it comes down to it, it's all about having fun and expanding the boundaries of cycling. If you aren't into it, then don't fucking pay attention - we DON'T care...

    As far as fixed tricks looking like shit -

    Watch that and tall me that the kid doesn't have a really fluid style.
  9.  
    Id love to skate at that tunnel Id get so gnarly
  10.  
    Posted By: yourboychriscWatch that and tall me that the kid doesn't have a really fluid style.

    Posted By: suicide_doorsI am far more interested in seeing a fluid routine or ride filled with combinations of tricks than I am in seeing a dude do one trick, then pedal himself around for half a minute before he can manage to do something else. It's like watching middle school kids learning to skate and doing the same five tricks over and over, crashing 70% of the time.

    I'm pretty sure that video proves my point. Mostly the same stuff, over and over, no more than two tricks are ever in the same shot, etc etc. Great BMX/skate/freeride riders can make a ride look like dance, and for more than a few seconds. Great fixed riders look, to me, are more like a construction worker walking along a steel girder, trying to keep his balance while carrying a bunch of shit -- yeah, it's hard, but it's not an attractive thing to watch.

    Like I said before, I'm not against fixed tricks or the people who do them, I'm just not interested (and yes, you don't care, and that's just fine). You, Prolly, Wonka, Pistol Pete, and Elmo, Big Bird, and the Easter Bunny are all welcome to do whatever you want with your bikes, and yeah, it's obviously working. We're all riding bikes and that's what matters.
    • CommentAuthorparkman14
    • CommentTimeMar 20th 2010
     
    There are some realllly good skate films. Yeah, skating is really nice to watch if the video isn't all choppy, even if you don't skate. I've seen a lot of really well made videos, conceptually and content wise.
    • CommentAuthorwes m.
    • CommentTimeMar 20th 2010
     
    The average 14 year old bmx kid could do everything in that video as clean if not cleaner. Thats the point, its impressive because its fixed gear. That doesnt mean it comes anywhere near approaching the fluidity and linking seen in bmx.
 
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