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  1.  
    what does that mean? i'm watching the 1989 Greg Lemond's time trial and he's using contriversial bars. if the opponent thinks it's too much of an advantage, but legal then they could use it too.
    • CommentAuthorJameson_C
    • CommentTimeMar 2nd 2010
     
    I think your spelling is the only thing 'contriversial'...
    • CommentAuthorRuffinit
    • CommentTimeMar 2nd 2010
     
    The "controversial" bars in 1989 were nothing more that clip-on Scotts that were used. BUT it was the first time they were used in that venue. Yes, the other teams could have used them also, but they chose not to. Other than that, the 55x12 gearing, his motivation and a perfect ride equates to the fastest time trial race in the history of the Tour.
    The Cannondale frames when they first came out with the 3.0 was also controversial in that they outlawed them at first as being too light. They were the lightest production frameset at the time. Any change of the norm in a given sport is at first seen as controversial.
  2.  
    This might be the best answer to one of LW's questions, ever.
    • CommentAuthorSkidMark
    • CommentTimeMar 2nd 2010 edited
     
    I agree, spellcheck is some controversial equipment.

    It's all Graeme Obree's fault. If he hadn't cobbled together a bike in his shed and broke Merckx' hour record, racing bikes would be much more diverse.
  3.  
    fignon was wearing glasses! how come he doesn't wear the helmet and rides obsolete technology?
  4.  
    Perhaps what was controversial was riding the stage without the aid of a spell-chucker.

    Oh.

    Never mind.
    • CommentAuthorwes m.
    • CommentTimeMar 2nd 2010 edited
     
    Its controversial because there was an equipment standard that operated on what amounts to a gentlemens agreement. Anyone could have used the bars but they didnt because they the tour had always used drops or bullhorns in the tt, they were all used to drops or bullhorns, and no one really wanted to do otherwise. When Lemond came along with aerobars he used an advantage that no one else had chosen to or wanted to use. Basically, he forced everyone else in the tour to adopt aerobars if they wanted to stay competitive. That pissed people off.

    People had been working on technological advantages ever since the beginning of the tour. I think Lemond's aerobars pissed people off so much because it was one of the first things that made the bike look dramatically different. Also, if you are an American who kicks Europe's ass in a European sport you will be called a cheater even if you are the cleanest athlete in the race.
    • CommentAuthorNash
    • CommentTimeMar 2nd 2010
     
    airnt you in collage writting resarch papars on jeanetic copywrite lawz?
  5.  
    well that's good for cycling industry. sounds like he made history of obsolete parts. if better technologies were available, they should be used. i know that means more and more spent on better parts but cycling is about equal parts man and machine. the machine doesn't do any more work than the man does.
    • CommentAuthorSkidMark
    • CommentTimeMar 2nd 2010 edited
     
    Don't know if you are aware of this, but the Tour de France is steeped in tradition.

    I would like to a historical tour, one with no mechanics, no spare parts beyond sewups, steel frame, aluminum components, either fixed gear or ten-speed friction shifting. They should also have espresso and smoke breaks.
    • CommentAuthorwes m.
    • CommentTimeMar 2nd 2010
     
    wool kits and goggles too.
    • CommentAuthorthe rabbi
    • CommentTimeMar 2nd 2010
     
    Don't forget the cycling shoes with wood soles.
    • CommentAuthorRuffinit
    • CommentTimeMar 2nd 2010
     
    Posted By: wes m.if you are an American who kicks Europe's ass in a European sport you will be called a cheater even if you are the cleanest athlete in the race.

    Don't forget though that LeMond was embraced by the europeans because he was actually a cyclist in the purest sense. He rode and competed with them in all the competitions. He didn't just train to race a specific race like L.A. who is a great athlete, but not a great cyclist. LeMond honored the traditions and pushed where he was aware that they could be pushed. Not an "in your face" kind of challenge, but one that though it pushed the envelope, was something that they could all live with. LeMond was never accused of cheating or doping because he was one with those who he competed against. Plus he's one of the nicest guys you'll ever meet; although he was one of the world's elite cyclists, he was not an elitist.
  6.  
    Laurent Fignon was basically just a normal dude who happened to be able to ride bikes really fast. He didn't grow up cycling, but he basically just got on the bike and rode. People may forget he won the tour before twice before the bout at the Champs d' Elysees, and many other professional tours and one-days. I suppose he didn't wear a TT helmet or use the aero bars because without those, isn't it more of a test of man than machine? That's another discussion, of which I am on both sides, but perhaps Mr. Fignon decided either he didn't need them or didn't care. He still finished second in a grueling tour by a mere 8 seconds. I've heard that if he didn't have the pony tail he may have saved enough time to win.
    • CommentAuthorwes m.
    • CommentTimeMar 2nd 2010 edited
     
    He said saddle sores held him back more than any technological advantage. It wouldnt surprise me if his ponytail cost him 8 seconds over the course of thousands of miles. I think they were more concerned about having a flat back and strong legs than they were about an aerodynamic haircut back then.

    I think that moment really marked the point where the era of bad ass ended and the era of high-tech began. The guys in the modern tour are still more bad ass than us but they seem to lack that raw characteristic of the earlier riders. The earlier riders were like rocky in rocky IV (the one in Russia).
    • CommentAuthorparkman14
    • CommentTimeMar 2nd 2010
     
    It almost looks like those time trial frames exposed more of your body to drag haha
  7.  
    Posted By: lickedwickedcycling is about equal parts man and machine. the machine doesn't do any more work than the man does.


    You are terribly, TERRIBLY wrong with this statement. Completely wrong.
  8.  
    Posted By: terrible_one49You are terrible

    Good luck with that...
  9.  
    Posted By: suicide_doors
    Posted By: terrible_one49You are terrible

    Good luck with that...


    Typo. Thanks for catching that. I'm the only terrible around here.
 
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