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  1.  
    Ok, so I have a road frame, and a NOS stronglight crank, with an ISO taper.
    So, it requires a 112mm spindle, but all I can find is 108/9mm, 110 by Miche (cheap though) and 110.5 campy taper from Phils.
    If I run the 130mm hub as I should, what chainline issues can I run into?

    Now, the other Q is, can I run a track hub on a road frame? >> I have a fixed ride already so...wondering what the pros/cons are.
    ^^I apologize for my noobness.

    Thanks in advance, and I will def. pass on some beers to my local shop when they install the stuff/build up my wheels :)
  2.  
    120mm 130mm is just the axel length so you wont have an issue with chainline unless you are running the wrong size bb spindle other than that you can put the chainring inside or outside the crank to adjust the chainline a little
  3.  
    ^^^So, to put the point on it, what would happen if run 109mm vs 110.5? Possibly have the chainwheel too close/eating into the stays or????
    edit: spindle is for 112 or 113mm, older stronglight - and I'm not sure if I want to move it just yet.
    • CommentAuthorthe rabbi
    • CommentTimeFeb 28th 2010
     
    Posted By: bensonisajew120mm 130mm is just the axel length so you wont have an issue with chainline unless you are running the wrong size bb spindle other than that you can put the chainring inside or outside the crank to adjust the chainline a little
    wrong-o.
    120mm is the width of the dropouts. they make 130mm track hubs to fit road frames, too.
  4.  
    sorry i ment to say that certain axel lengths that fits 120-130mm dropouts
    • CommentAuthorSkidMark
    • CommentTimeFeb 28th 2010
     
    You need to compare the chainline of the crankset to the chainline of the 130mm hub.

    Hint: the spindle length is not the chainline

    the hub width is not the chainline.
    • CommentAuthorCanadaSteep
    • CommentTimeMar 2nd 2010 edited
     
    ^^The Rabbi is right. Profile makes 130mm track hubs.

    Skidmark - So, it requires a 112mm spindle, but all I can find is 108/9mm, 110 by Miche (cheap though) and 110.5 campy taper from Phils.
    If I run the 130mm hub as I should, what chainline issues can I run into?
    Can you say more than "it depends"?

    My point is, if I move the crank in a bit to 109mm, and we approximate the 130mm to the average/norm chainline of road hubs, what happens?
    if I run a Profile 130mm, then?
    It's just that 112 or 113 seems like a jump down to 109, so....trying to understand what bad can happen.

    Just because I don't know doesn't mean I don't get things :)

    Cranks are here - https://velospace.org/node/27361
    • CommentAuthorLegislator
    • CommentTimeMar 2nd 2010 edited
     
    skidmark is right here. go read up on chainline, since it depends on a lot more factors than just your crank and bottom bracket. it relies on what hub, cog, frame and sometimes chainring you use and all of those things affect each other and all can usually be changed slightly with spacers, especially a BB. if you're frame's rear triangle isn't dead straight it will affect your chainline, and alot more than the difference between a 109.5 or 111 BB spindle or whatever the numbers are.

    also, LEARN HOW TO USE A RULER AND SOME CALIPERS, and most of your problems with this will go away.
    • CommentAuthorSkidMark
    • CommentTimeMar 2nd 2010 edited
     
    Well if you "get it" then why are you still talking about hub spacing having anything to do with chainline?

    Chainline is measured from the centerline of the bike. You could have a hub spaced 120 or 130 and it will have the same chainline. Most hubs are between 41 and 44 mm.

    The way you are mixing brands on bottom bracket it is going to be very difficult to determine chainline without installing a bottom bracket and measuring. If Stronglight specs a 112 spindle then I would get whatever is closest to that crank it down and make a measurement.

    Did you read this?

    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/chainline.html

    Why not?
  5.  
    Campy makes a BB with 111 mm spindle and it sells for $34 (or maybe less) on line. That's only .5 mm per side from what you get with a 112 mm spindle. If you have a BB with the proper taper, you can hook the crank up to it, measure the resulting chain line (distance from center of spindle to center of sprocket) and then adjust to the spindle length you will be using. My guess is that you will not be accurate to within .5 mm, but you will get an idea of how the center line of the front sprocket will compare to the center line of the rear sprocket, assuming that you know where the hub you will be using places the rear sprocket.
  6.  
    Skidmark: I did read that before hand.
    Did you read this: My point is, if I move the crank in a bit to 109mm, and we approximate the 130mm to the average/norm chainline of road hubs, what happens?
    ^^If it wasn't clear, I'd like to know what happens if you run a spindle that's 2mm or so too short, everything else being on the level. Too simple.
    If it wasn't clear, my bad.
    Than ks though, as I forgot about hubs having their own variances.
    ^^^Been out of home mechanic-ing for many years now, but getting back ont he bike, as it were.

    The article is about attaining a desired chainline, but I didn't see anything about the cons or what happens if you're off.

    I came across Token spindles with ISO tapers....any good, or just stick with campy for the same money.
    • CommentAuthorSkidMark
    • CommentTimeMar 6th 2010 edited
     
    130 mm is not the chainline, it is the distance between the dropouts. It has no bearing on the chainline. Chainline is measured from the centerline of the bike to the centerline of the sprocket. Same with the spindle, 110 mm is the width of the spindle. The chainline is measured from the center of the bike to the center of the chainring.

    There is a good chance that you will have to buy more than one spindle, there is some trial and error involved. I just went thru this whole fiasco with two bikes and 3 bottom brackets. I got lucky because the bottom bracket I bought for one bike actually gave the other bike a perfect chainline. Now both bikes are as close to perfect as they can be, and both are rolling on sealed bottom brackets, so I don't have to screw with them at all.

    If the chainline is off more than 5mm or so it will wear the sides of the sprocket/chainring, and there is the off chance of the chain derailing.
    • CommentAuthorCanadaSteep
    • CommentTimeMar 7th 2010 edited
     
    ^^I know 130 is the width/spindle etc., I forgot that each hub can have a variance within, like you said, 41-44.
    because BB have diff len gths, I assumed (wrong!) that hubs would be standard. Looking back w/ 20/20, why would they, or how could they be?

    Any thoughts on Token bottom brackets? --> And yes, I do run online searches for reviews.
    I figure that or the cheap campy is the best way to go for my $$$.

    What makes it harder is that the Stronglights I have are ISO taper, and they look nice and are brand new, so trying to make it work before moving them.
 
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