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    • CommentAuthorwowzah
    • CommentTimeJan 13th 2009
     
    With all the stopping the rear tire sees, it wears down much faster.

    I would think a worn down tire is much less important on a front wheel.

    Do people rotate their tires on track bikes? or just replace the rear tire, thoughts?
    • CommentAuthorianmichael
    • CommentTimeJan 13th 2009
     
    on one of my beater i have the same tire front and back. on it, yes i do rotate when i notice the back one getting slippery.
    on my other bike however i run a different tire front and back so i just replace the back one when it gets worn down.
  1.  
    Rotate when the back starts look look flat on top.
    • CommentAuthorAaron C
    • CommentTimeJan 13th 2009 edited
     
    rotating is a horrendous idea. a good tire in the front is far more important than i the rear. think about it the front tire of your bike is responsible for cornering, you should always have plenty of rubber up there. although tread is basically redundant if you are doing only street or track riding, if you look bmx for example a large number of riders put a somewhat knobby tire on the front wheel and a slick or road tire on the back. this great for variations of terrain where you very well maybe riding on a hard surface with a loose layer of dirt on top.
    i dont know where i am going with this but the condition of the front tire is of far more importance, esp. on the street.

    that being said i do "rotate" my tires when the back is done i make it into a belt or something and if my front tire is still in good shape i throw it in the back and put a new tire on the front.
  2.  
    Most road tires are smooth down the center, and a slight tread on the sides. Usually how a road/track tire wears, is right down the center causing a it to become flat, or squared off on the top. So, having more tread on the sides of the tire for sharp turning is really not a worry, because that area does not wear down as much.

    Now what you need to be concerned about is that, clearly, the rear tire wears faster than the front, given the fact most of us ride fixed and skid to stop. Therefore, that tire is thiner down the center of the tire that touches the road. Now, realize...the rear tire has MUCH greater weight on it than the front tire. So if you have a worn/thin tire in the back, and have more weight on it, it's more likely that you get a flat and/or pick up glass and such in the road.

    So, basically...yes, you want a tire with good tread in the front, but you want the stronger/thicker of the tires in the back. So......you rotate them when the back gets more worn. This way, they both will wear equally, and when you need new tires, you replace both at the same time, which is the best thing to do.
    • CommentAuthorwxm
    • CommentTimeJan 13th 2009
     
    Posted By: wowzahWith all the stopping the rear tire sees, it wears down much faster.

    I would think a worn down tire is much less important on a front wheel.

    Do people rotate their tires on track bikes? or just replace the rear tire, thoughts?


    Not sure it is proven to be that case that rear tire wears faster for track bike. I would imagine the opposite - comparing to the regular brake, there is no chance you can stop your track bike more effectively than a pair of brake pads - therefore, I think you actually get less wear riding track bike. So don't bother...
    • CommentAuthorsixspeed
    • CommentTimeJan 13th 2009
     
    REPLACE
    • CommentAuthorAaron C
    • CommentTimeJan 13th 2009
     
    i agree it is just best to replace.
    my point is this: for anyone who rides a track bike on the street (or a conversion) and skids even somewhat frequently will be replacing their rear tires due to wear far, far sooner than the front.
    as it is my sole form of transport is my bicycle and i commute during the workweek a minimum of 3o-35mi/day plus any other errands. i do not skid frequently, yet i have to replace my rear several times a year. generally my front tire at this point is still running around 75-80% (estimation) with basically no visible wear. this would obviously not be the case if i was riding a gear bike or a single speed but that is besides the point.
    additionally i always run puncture resistant tires and do not swap front to the back if it is questionable the tire is questionable. again since this is about skidding i assume this discussion pertains in no way to actual track racing. in the last few years i can remember i have had only 3 flats riding every day and two were on brandnew front tires from punctures and a rear which was a snake bite after i left home in a rush with a tire woefully underflated (sidenote: bosses almost never think the "i popped a bike tire on the way to work" excuse is legitimate)

    another point maybe its just me but running tread on a track bike is redundant (unless you are doing off roading or winter riding) so talking about cross tires with tread on the shoulders doesn't really come into play here.

    in general my anecdotal experience over several years is that rotating front to back and pitching your spent rear does lengthen the total life span of any given tire, but only if you are skidding enough to wear the rear out significantly faster than the front.

    rant done.
    im sure many of you have read this but its worth it if you haven't. also if racing bmx for ten years taught me anything it is that running different tread patterns on the front and rear for mixed riding is the best idea around.

    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/tires.html
    more specifically: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/tire-rotation.html
    • CommentAuthorryanw
    • CommentTimeJan 13th 2009
     
    If you want, you could actually just take the chain off and rotate either the crankset or the wheel a little bit. Then just put the chain back on. This will cause your skid patch to move a little bit, but you can still have your feet in the same place when you skid. If you don't want to take the chain off, another way is to deflate the tire, and reposition it differently on the wheel.
    • CommentAuthorbionnaki
    • CommentTimeJan 14th 2009
     
    old front goes on the rear.
    old rear goes in the trash.
  3.  
    Posted By: ryanwIf you want, you could actually just take the chain off and rotate either the crankset or the wheel a little bit. Then just put the chain back on. This will cause your skid patch to move a little bit, but you can still have your feet in the same place when you skid. If you don't want to take the chain off, another way is to deflate the tire, and reposition it differently on the wheel.


    You should do this anyway, because after time, your chainring will become more worn and actually begin to take on an oval shape, due to the fact that you put more force into the pedals when they are level, compared to when they are vertical up and down. You should actually remove your chainring and rotate it slightly.
    • CommentAuthorK3NNY
    • CommentTimeJan 14th 2009
     
    NEVER put your rear tire on the front EVER, throw it away.
  4.  
    Posted By: K3NNYNEVER put your rear tire on the front EVER, throw it away.


    You must be from America, because that seems to the the American mentality with everything. Just throw away perfectly good things and buy, buy, BUY!
    • CommentAuthorAaron C
    • CommentTimeJan 14th 2009
     
    i hope you are being sarcastic.

    running a worn out rear wheel on the front is just not safe.
    • CommentAuthorK3NNY
    • CommentTimeJan 14th 2009
     
    Posted By: terrible_one49
    Posted By: K3NNYNEVER put your rear tire on the front EVER, throw it away.


    You must be from America, because that seems to the the American mentality with everything. Just throw away perfectly good things and buy, buy, BUY!


    Haha the funny thing is I was going to suggest he turn it into a belt or a sling shot or something but I got lazy and just kept it short and sweet.
    • CommentAuthorbionnaki
    • CommentTimeJan 14th 2009 edited
     
    a worn tire is not a "perfectly good" thing.
    what else do you suggest to do with the tire?

    and arent you from rhode island?
  5.  
    Christ. I'm not saying put a completely DEAD tire on the front. I'm saying, every once in awhile ROTATE them so they both wear EVENLY! I'm not saying skid away the rear tire till the threads show, then put it on the front. C'mon now. None of us are that stupid. At least I hope not.

    Yeah. I'm from RI. And I dislike how wasteful Americans are.
    • CommentAuthorbionnaki
    • CommentTimeJan 14th 2009 edited
     
    that makes no sense.

    if you rotate both tires evenly, you'll still end up with two worn tires.
    and then you throw those two tires away and purchase two new ones.

    our method involves the same amount of consumption as yours
    with the only difference is whether you want to purchase one or two tires at a time.
    the consumption rate is identical.

    duh.

    if you consider riding bicycles and using tires as wasteful (perhaps it is, perhaps it is not)
    then why do you ride a bicycle? wearing out tires is unavoidable.

    unless you have a solution for the worn tires besides throwing them away, please keep your criticisms to yourself.

    you're just as guility of "American" style consumption as the rest of us - if not more since you dont ride with a brake and obviously skid through tires, where some of use use brakes and have to purchase less tires.
  6.  
    This is hopeless.

    Okay, look... you have a tire on the back....it wears down at X rate of time. You have a tire on the front...it wears down at Y rate of speed, which is slower than X. If you were to leave the same tire in the X position, it would be dead much faster than Y. So, by changing it to the Y, front, position, you are prolonging the amount of time that you are actually riding that tire. Does that not make sense to you?

    I was always told, by professional road bikers, it's best to rotate your tires before they become too squared off on top, and it's best to always change both tires new at the same time.

    Anyway...in the end, you can do it this way or you can do it that way. It really does not matter. It's no big deal. We're all entitled to our own option and ideas here. It does not mean one person is right and the other wrong.

    And yes, I'm wasteful as fuck all, and love it! I'm American!
    • CommentAuthorbionnaki
    • CommentTimeJan 15th 2009 edited
     
    in the end, you still have two worn tires no matter how you rotate.
    if all things are equal (riding time, road conditions, weight of the rider, and method of stopping),
    the consumption level is exactly the same.

    and seriously - you should check yourself before pointing fingers.
    you're just as guilty of waste as anyone else - and perhaps more because you skid through tires.
 
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