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    • CommentAuthorhenrydec1
    • CommentTimeJan 12th 2010
     
    so i know one guy who rides tubular's on the street, from what i hear they are lighter. and obviously they can be run at higher PSI. does any one ride them on the street? on a track bike? for my next build i am thinking about building some up. how long do they last with skids? And what is the deal with flats? if you get one are you fucked? or is there a way to prevent/fix flats? thank you every one.
    • CommentAuthorhenrydec1
    • CommentTimeJan 12th 2010
     
    and how well does Tufo Sealant/Vittoria Pit Stop work?
    • CommentAuthorwes m.
    • CommentTimeJan 12th 2010
     
    DO NOT USE TUBULAR TIRES IF YOU SKID. They are expensive and they dont make any that would be consider durable by modern fixed gear skid around town standards.

    You may be thinking "hey, i could just skid on cheap tubulars". No! Cheap tubulars are worse than good clinchers.

    You can repair a flat. You must remove the tire from the rim, unstitch the seam, patch the tube, restitch the tire, and glue it back onto the rim. It is a f'ing pain.
    • CommentAuthorSkidMark
    • CommentTimeJan 12th 2010
     
    The only way I would run tubulars on the street is if it were a classic bike or an NJS bike and I wanted to maintain it with all the original parts.

    To purposely build up a set of tubs for anything but track/road/cyclocross racing makes no sense whatsoever.
    • CommentAuthorpeterabbit
    • CommentTimeJan 12th 2010
     
    don't do it. i did it for a summer and it sucked ass. tubulars roll super smooth but arent worth it for street riding. i only know one person who rides them on the street in denver on an older de rosa but he doesnt skid. skidding once on a tubular takes a shit ton of the rubber off, the things are basically cotton casing with a little rubber around them. vittoria pit stop is nice but it takes like 5 minutes to set and doesnt always work, tufo sealant is a better but you have to take the valve core out to pour it in an it doesnt always screw back in well.
    • CommentAuthorBamfs01
    • CommentTimeJan 12th 2010
     
    +1 fo not doin it. I did it and didn't know that I'd be pumping my tires up daily. It was aweful. Sewups typically have those synthetic (can't remember what materiral ATM) which is lighter but more porus and mine lost 60-70% of thir air nightly. So terrible. Being able to put more air in em's not really a good thing for street riding either. It makes for a rougher ride and since roads are imperfect, you'll be bouncing around more which actually slows you down. Do some more research on tire pressure, there's a typical max point you don't wanna pass which at top is about 120 psi (based on a 200 lb rider). That max is lower if you weigh less. So it's not gunna matter if you can commute on 220 psi because you shouldn't ever want to. Wow that sounds like a bad road ride.
  1.  
    you can use it on the front where you don't skid.
    • CommentAuthorlatron
    • CommentTimeJan 13th 2010
     
    +1 for not doing it at all -- front or rear, fixed or free. Terrible idea.
    • CommentAuthorRuffinit
    • CommentTimeJan 13th 2010
     
    Good advice all....
    Tubulars are typically made with latex tubes and silk casing, though some quality tires run high count cotton. All this with a high quality rubber compound. They are made for light weight as you mentioned, and for ride quality. Because of that there isn't as much rubber on them, so you'll skid right through them. I wouldn't suggest any riders without experience ride them except on a track bike ON the track.
    I assume that you won't be doing any road, criterium, triatalon or TT racing, so you're better off putting your money where it's better suited.

    If you've ever walked in a true sprinter's shoe, you'll know they aren't made for normal running or even walking the mall.. Much the same as tubulars...
  2.  
    I ride them on the street about 40-50 miles at a stab (17 out, 10 mile TT, then 17 back). No big deal. Use a brake and you can run 'em all day long.

    Things get better once you're out of the city where there's broken glass/crackheads/nails and such.
    • CommentAuthorBamfs01
    • CommentTimeJan 13th 2010 edited
     
    Posted By: henrydec1and how well does Tufo Sealant/Vittoria Pit Stop work?


    It puts air and hole filler in the tube so when you get a hole/flat, you can make it home.

    Edit: I missread this, I don't know how well it works for a long term solution. I think it's primary purpose is to get you home but don't quote me on that.
  3.  
    Most people ride tubulars to save rotation weight on their wheels. Why would they want to fill their rim with a pound full of slime? It would defeat the purpose of trying to save weight by riding tubulars.

    Anyway...I personally ride a tubular front wheel, and love it. I ride it on the street only, around the city. Never any flats or any problems. However, I ride with a really nice Continental Competition tire. I love the feel of tubulars on the road. They just feel more grounded and smoother.
    • CommentAuthorBamfs01
    • CommentTimeJan 13th 2010
     
    Posted By: terrible_one49Most people ride tubulars to save rotation weight on their wheels. Why would they want to fill their rim with a pound full of slime? It would defeat the purpose of trying to save weight by riding tubulars.

    Anyway...I personally ride a tubular front wheel, and love it. I ride it on the street only, around the city. Never any flats or any problems. However, I ride with a really nice Continental Competition tire. I love the feel of tubulars on the road. They just feel more grounded and smoother.


    I approve this message.
    • CommentAuthorLegislator
    • CommentTimeJan 13th 2010 edited
     
    Tubulars AKA singles are less susceptible to flats due to the fact that it is impossible to pinch flat them. This is the reason they are great for cyclocross, because you can run them at really low pressure. As far as riding them on the street, as long as you're willing to put up with the hassle of gluing and stitching and waiting, and you have plenty of cash to spend, go for it. Don't skid though, like everyone else said, there is less than 1mm of rubber on lots of road tubulars, and you will eat them with skids. I plan on running singles on my two bikes with wooden rims, as soon as I get my lazy a$$ in gear and get the bikes rideable, and I get a crapload of cash to buy tires, but neither bike will be ridden much, or hard, or ever skidded on.
    • CommentAuthorRuffinit
    • CommentTimeJan 13th 2010
     
    Well once he asked about skidding and riding on the street I made the assumption that he will be trying to ride it like a lot of you younger guys.. In that respect unless he has a bunch of money to throw around these are not his best bet.

    I ride them too on my Colnago, and have ridden them for years, but there are certain things they are great for and certain things that they are not so great for.
    • CommentAuthorhenrydec1
    • CommentTimeJan 13th 2010
     
    thanks guys, i will start thinking about some thing else.
    • CommentAuthorhenrydec1
    • CommentTimeJan 24th 2010
     
    i got a front, and clincher rear for skidding. glue or tape?
  4.  
    Don't be afraid of tubulars for the street. I've been riding a front tubular for 1/2 a year around my cities horrible streets, no problem. I'm actually riding TWO tubulars now, no problem.

    HOWEVER....you need to ride with good quality tubular tires. Something like Continental Competition, or a tire with vectran layer to stop puncture.

    When I used to get flats with clinchers anyway, it was mainly due to pinch flats, not puncture, and pinch flats are not a problem with tubulars.

    Have your tire professionally glued by your local shop where all the roadies in spandex hangout. Don't take it to a hipster/BMX bikeshop, because they won't be as good at gluing tires properly.
    • CommentAuthorjayohachen
    • CommentTimeJan 25th 2010
     
    +1 on getting you tubulars done at some old bike shop. For the njs bikebuild, I went to one of those hipster/BMX places and they took 2+ weeks. The tubulars weren't even straight and the glue was thick in some places & thin in others. I went to one where the guy is like 80 years old and he did it in 2 days, perfectly straight and the glue was nice and consistent. Although, I had to listen to him for 30 mins about how he still doesn't use clinchers & how easy we have it these days.

    Been using sew-ups for a few years now and the only flats i had was from someone trying to steal my bike and then slashing my tires from failing.

    They feel better then my clinchers on the road and even better on the velodrome (although that might have something to do with them being on the Araya Golds while the clinchers are on the Atlantas). Try em out!
  5.  
    Posted By: jayohachen+1 on getting you tubulars done at some old bike shop. For the njs bikebuild, I went to one of those hipster/BMX places and they took 2+ weeks. The tubulars weren't even straight and the glue was thick in some places & thin in others. I went to one where the guy is like 80 years old and he did it in 2 days, perfectly straight and the glue was nice and consistent. Although, I had to listen to him for 30 mins about how he still doesn't use clinchers & how easy we have it these days.


    Yeah, I recently had some tubulars glued by a shop owned by bike messengers and young guys, and the tires have a slight wobble to them and they got glue all over the side of my rims and tires. ONLY get your tubulars glued by old guys that know what they are doing.
 
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