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    • CommentAuthorSkidMark
    • CommentTimeMar 10th 2010
     
    Whatever I had a flat on my BMX and two flats on my track bike last week. Half my trips into the city have resulted in a flat. My tallbike, fixed/free MTB, and cruiser all have slow leaks in the front tire.
    • CommentAuthorwes m.
    • CommentTimeMar 10th 2010
     
    Posted By: cyciumxPortland must be a ton more bike friendly than where I'm from - I get a flat once a week on clinchers and once a month on a tubular... a tubular costs a lot more than a new tube


    I saw the SJPD sweeping broken glass from a car crash into the bike lane. I'm sure that doesnt surprise you.
  1.  
    At least safety glass isn't very sharp. Right now, a lot of our bike lanes are full of sand, which is entertaining.
  2.  
    Posted By: terrible_one49
    Depending on your gear ratio, you don't need to skid. I ride 48/17 brakeless and NEVER skid to stop. I have strong legs and can slow the bike down just as fast that skidding is not needed.


    i'm no advocate for riding on the street without any mechanical braking, but if you're going to do it, pay attention to what to49 is saying here. skidding should not be your preferred mode of stopping. the shortest stopping distance will always come from applying reverse leg force just up to the point of skidding, but not past it. you may recall from high school physics that the coefficient of sliding friction (between any two given things) is always less than the coefficient of static friction. static friction is when your tire is normal contact with pavement, and sliding friction is when the tire is skidding against the pavement. you can't stop as quickly when you're skidding, period. it's not the easiest thing to modulate your leg braking force just enough to keep from skidding, but as to49 says, it can be done. go ahead and practice skidding for your videos and skidding competitions, but i recommend also practicing not skidding if you're interested in bicycling another day.
  3.  
    You simply need stronger legs if you're riding a brakeless track bike.

    Go to Walmart and buy a few 10-30lbs dumbbells and do some squats, standing heel calf raises and dumbbell lunges or straight-leg deadlifts. Do each of them in a repetition of sets of 12, 10, 8, 6, 12 and 12, going up in weight a few pounds each set, resting a minute between each repetition. Do this every 2-3 days, and in a couple weeks, you will notice a HUGE difference in your legs. I can give you a more precise and detailed plan if you're interested, but doing these few simple exercises for 20-30 minutes a couple days a week will give you very strong legs.
    • CommentAuthorquidose
    • CommentTimeMar 11th 2010
     
    Posted By: Joshua A.C. NewmanAt least safety glass isn't very sharp. Right now, a lot of our bike lanes are full of sand, which is entertaining.


    I've noticed they love to use sand (instead of salt) on the East Coast.
  4.  
    I'm not sure what's worse. Salt or sand. They use salt almost all year, which is terrible for cars and metal because it eats away at the metal and paint. However, this last storm we had here in New England, they put down sand, and now there is big sand patches in the roads still weeks later and it's dangerous. Ugh.
  5.  
    stronger legs are definitely important for riding brakeless, i agree. but it does take some practice to keep from locking up your rear wheel every time you want to stop.

    on that topic, sand is better for skidding than salt. they have been using more sand here in michigan as well, in part because (if i recall correctly) salt got more expensive last fall, and road departments are hurting for cash. apparently someone stole something like 10 or 20 tons of road salt from the county last fall; that was quite a heist. maybe they just sold it back, though.

    even more on topic, i rode tubulars on the street for several years on my first 10-speed, because 35 years ago there was no comparison; the narrowest clinchers were at least 1 inch, probably bigger. i had the big sewing kit, got the glue all over my hands, and all that. they really do ride nice, but they are a bit more work to maintain. the natural rubber tubes were the hardest to repair.
    • CommentAuthorquidose
    • CommentTimeMar 11th 2010
     
    Yea, you beat me to it. I meant to say that I've seen salt used almost exclusively except in Michigan and Maine (and other parts of New England), where they love to pour huge bags of sand all over the streets.
    • CommentAuthorkaaos
    • CommentTimeMar 11th 2010
     
    Posted By: terrible_one49

    Depending on your gear ratio, you don't need to skid. I ride 48/17 brakeless and NEVER skid to stop.


    +1
    • CommentAuthorkaido_k
    • CommentTimeMar 11th 2010
     
    OK this is from my personal experience.
    First off if you have to have a shop mount your tubulars, don't bother riding them on the street. As for the talk about crappy mounting/bumpy/glue over rim/etc. pre stretching tubulars help with the bump around the valve stem on cheap tubulars and masking tape on the rim helps with the excess glue.
    Please don't talk about the pinch flat arguement unless you are talking cross applications. If you get pinch flats with clinchers, don't ride tubulars on the street. I say this because if you can't even do simple preventive maintenance like keeping air in your clinchers...
    For those that talk about riding tubulars only in the front, what advantage does this have? Yeah that tri spoke might have been cheaper cuz tubie, but do you carry 2 different spares? A spare tube and a tubular tire?
    My comments on riding brakeless in the street.
    Forget all this talk about stopping.
    Brakes or no brakes, in a serious oh shit situation you are screwed either way. Learn to ride with at least 2 or more alternate lines you can take. Always be aware of holes that are available if needed to use. Flow and avoid.
    I like tubulars.
    But clinchers for hills.
    OP: Just get a cheap set of used tubulars and see if you like it. Only so much you can imagine from message board talk. Worse case you sell them for what you bought them.
  6.  
    Posted By: kaido_kPlease don't talk about the pinch flat arguement unless you are talking cross applications. If you get pinch flats with clinchers, don't ride tubulars on the street. I say this because if you can't even do simple preventive maintenance like keeping air in your clinchers...


    You cannot get pinch-flats on tubulars, at least they are VERY rare.

    Posted By: kaido_kFor those that talk about riding tubulars only in the front, what advantage does this have? Yeah that tri spoke might have been cheaper cuz tubie, but do you carry 2 different spares? A spare tube and a tubular tire?


    Majority of flats happen in the rear tire because more weight is on it, making it easier to get a pinch flat if you hit a pothole, and also it tends to pick up glass and shit more. That is why some people will trust a tubular in the front than the rear.
  7.  
    The first decent bike I owned was a Falcon that I bought in Miami in 1975. It had tubulars on Mavic rims laced to some high flange Campagnolo Nuovo Tipo hubs. For about twelve years, I rode tubulars on that bike and then decided I was going to build some wheels. Figured I'd build with clinchers on some Normandy hubs that I had and then build the Tipos back with some tubulars. After riding the clinchers for a while, I forgot about the tubulars and never have gotten around to building with the Tipo hubs. Actually, it was fixing the first flat on the clinchers that convinced me that I never wanted tubulars again. Maybe if I were a stronger rider, I'd appreciate the performance advantage of tubulars, but I'm not, and I don't.
    • CommentAuthorcyciumx
    • CommentTimeMar 11th 2010
     
    I kinda took the whole... dont do the tubular if you get clincher pinch flats as... If you are too incompetent or inattentive to even maintain proper air pressure on a clincher than you are way under prepared for the even minimal care of a tubular. I bet a lot of folks who used clinchers their whole lives wouldn't even realize just how high pressure tubular tires need to be pumped.
    • CommentAuthorwes m.
    • CommentTimeMar 11th 2010
     
    Posted By: cyciumxI kinda took the whole... dont do the tubular if you get clincher pinch flats as... If you are too incompetent or inattentive to even maintain proper air pressure on a clincher than you are way under prepared for the even minimal care of a tubular. I bet a lot of folks who used clinchers their whole lives wouldn't even realize just how high pressure tubular tires need to be pumped.


    Thats how I took it, and I agreed with it.
  8.  
    Posted By: cyciumxI kinda took the whole... dont do the tubular if you get clincher pinch flats as... If you are too incompetent or inattentive to even maintain proper air pressure on a clincher than you are way under prepared for the even minimal care of a tubular. I bet a lot of folks who used clinchers their whole lives wouldn't even realize just how high pressure tubular tires need to be pumped.


    Yeah. Even before I even began using tubulars on the track, I took a class at my local co-op on maintenance and potential casualties. There was much more care involved that I was unaware of. I mean, not a GREAT deal of care, but moreso than is involved with clinchers.

    I, myself, would be afraid to ride tubulars on the street solely because I am afraid of ruining an expensive tire. But I would be willing to give it a try once I am financially comfortable enough. I trust a lot of your guys' opinion on here.
    • CommentAuthorpeazweag
    • CommentTimeMar 12th 2010
     
    WHY RUN TUBULARS,THE CLINCHERS ARE SO GOOD NOWADAYS.AND MUCH EASIER TO SET-UP.BUT IT'S YOUR LIFE.I'M FROM THE SCHOOL/DON'T GO LIGHTER GET STRONGER.
    • CommentAuthorcyciumx
    • CommentTimeMar 12th 2010
     
    While you're at that school see if they teach the meaning of the word supple.

    On a side note - I don't even use glue, but opt for Tufo Tape. When I get a flat the tubular is changed in minutes. I have changed clinchers quick before too, but more often than not that is with a very worn tire that has a looser bead. New tires and my thumbs don't like each other.
    • CommentAuthorkaaos
    • CommentTimeMar 13th 2010
     
    if you want to try tubulars I suggest you do two things:
    1. use Tufo tape instead of glue (there is no need to make your tubular tire experience more difficult than it needs to be). Tufo tape is very easy to apply and it works well. It will take you not more than 15 min to put new tubular tire on.
    2. use good quality tubular tire. You wouldn't ride with cheap and low quality clincher tire, so don't do that with tubular too... get a good quality tubular and than you will have a fair comparison.

    It's OK if you don't like them or you can't tell the difference. Ride with what you like and leave others to do the same.
    • CommentAuthorpeterabbit
    • CommentTimeMar 17th 2010 edited
     
    Dont want to re-hash this but had something somewhat relevant to add

    Just bought a new front wheel for the track, C-Record Hub on a Campy Tubular rim with a tire already glued. I figured no one would be stupid enough to ride a tubular front wheel on the streets, nonetheless a Sheriff Star hub which are known to tear flanges from street riding, so I was pretty sure I was getting a track ridden only wheel which is what I'll be using it for.

    But I finally get the thing in the mail like 3 weeks later and the tire pressure is a little low and I look at the tire and its gnar as fuck, tons of little holes from glass and shit. So I pump it up to about 120 to see if it will hold air, turn my back and
    HISSSSSSSS.. Tufo liquid latex is spewing out of all these little holes all over my room and it smells like shit!

    Lame. Needless to say the seller didn't get the greatest feedback.
 
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