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    • CommentAuthorcyrsir51
    • CommentTimeJan 26th 2010 edited
     
    Posted By: terrible_one49
    Posted By: jayohachenHas anyone noticed that some tubulars need to pumped like every two days? I had some Soyo's that were flat after a few days of riding while some haven't had the need for more air after weeks and weeks.


    Hmmm....in my experience, no. Actually, quite the opposite! I have to pump up my clinchers every week to keep them at the max PSI. My tubulars stay at max PSI for weeks, no change!


    With my front tubie i had that problem... My rim was 45 mm thick and needed a value extender.. so im guessing air would leak out ... tire wouldnt go flat, just alittle soft. Should check your air pressure before every ride any way to be safe...

    At least i do.
  1.  
    Most high end tubulars are made of latex (to save weight) which lets air out after about a day or so. Lower end tubulars use more rubber, and so much they have more air holding in ability.

    For example, my Challenge Criterium tire will go flat in about a day after being at 180 psi, while my Tufo S33 Special will pretty much stay full all the time.

    This also is the case for clincher tubes.
    • CommentAuthorbionnaki
    • CommentTimeJan 26th 2010 edited
     
    .
    • CommentAuthorCeya
    • CommentTimeJan 28th 2010 edited
     
    Posted By: wes m.DO NOT USE TUBULAR TIRES IF YOU SKID. They are expensive and they dont make any that would be consider durable by modern fixed gear skid around town standards.

    You may be thinking "hey, i could just skid on cheap tubulars". No! Cheap tubulars are worse than good clinchers.

    You can repair a flat. You must remove the tire from the rim, unstitch the seam, patch the tube, restitch the tire, and glue it back onto the rim. It is a f'ing pain.


    Why? have you done this and how long have you ridden on them?

    Tubular tires are good for the street and with any tire that you skid on you can have problems. I have had less with tubulars and ridden them for yrs.

    I have 17 plus yrs as a NYC messenger,retired twice 1997 and 2006 . I used them everyday.

    I give classes on them. It is how you mount them and do it correctly.

    True tires from yrs ago are not like today..Vittoria made in Italy is way better than Thailand.

    Contis are good to use.

    Use andonized rims they hold better and if you get flats you can ride on them.

    Mavic GEL 330 and GL 280 are excellent.

    I will continue this later.
    S/F,
    CEYA!
    • CommentAuthorNJS™
    • CommentTimeJan 28th 2010 edited
     
    I've been riding silk on the street for a very long time and I never looked back.

    CEYA your wasting your energy trying to make them understand, they don't know any better.
    • CommentAuthorCeya
    • CommentTimeJan 28th 2010
     
    It not to make converts but to clear up misconceptions.

    Its not like the battle on Bike Forums SSF.

    S/F<
    CEYA!
    • CommentAuthorwes m.
    • CommentTimeJan 28th 2010
     
    Posted By: Ceya
    Posted By: wes m.DO NOT USE TUBULAR TIRES IF YOU SKID. They are expensive and they dont make any that would be consider durable by modern fixed gear skid around town standards.

    You may be thinking "hey, i could just skid on cheap tubulars". No! Cheap tubulars are worse than good clinchers.

    You can repair a flat. You must remove the tire from the rim, unstitch the seam, patch the tube, restitch the tire, and glue it back onto the rim. It is a f'ing pain.


    Why? have you done this and how long have you ridden on them?

    Tubular tires are good for the street and with any tire that you skid on you can have problems. I have had less with tubulars and ridden them for yrs.

    I have 17 plus yrs as a NYC messenger,retired twice 1997 and 2006 . I used them everyday.

    I give classes on them. It is how you mount them and do it correctly.

    True tires from yrs ago are not like today..Vittoria made in Italy is way better than Thailand.

    Contis are good to use.

    Use andonized rims they hold better and if you get flats you can ride on them.

    Mavic GEL 330 and GL 280 are excellent.

    I will continue this later.
    S/F,
    CEYA!


    What exactly are you in disagreement with? Either way, your conflicting the general consensus and sheldon brown. Have fun on your tubulars, no one is trying to stop you!
    • CommentAuthorCeya
    • CommentTimeJan 28th 2010 edited
     
    Your statement of not skidding on tubulars.

    I asked have you done it (repair ) and ridden tubulars.

    Nothing personal and don't take it as such.

    Too much misconception about tubies (sew ups) on the street.

    I want to clear them up. pro/cons of them.


    S/F,
    CEYA!
    • CommentAuthorbionnaki
    • CommentTimeJan 28th 2010
     
    did you carry a spare sew up while messing?

    thanks for posting Ceya.
    • CommentAuthorwes m.
    • CommentTimeJan 28th 2010
     
    Yes, I have experience with tubulars.
    • CommentAuthoreaglerock
    • CommentTimeJan 28th 2010
     
    Posted By: CeyaYour statement of not skidding on tubulars.

    I asked have you done it (repair ) and ridden tubulars.

    Is it necessary for me to point out that riding on tubulars and skidding on tubulars are two very different things? That pointing out 17 years' experience riding on tubulars is irrelevant to a discussion on skidding, as most riding time isn't skidding, and most riders don't skid at all?

    Only in a fixed-gear-centric community would anyone even regard this as an issue worthy of argument.

    And yes, I have ridden and do ride tubulars.
    • CommentAuthorCeya
    • CommentTimeJan 28th 2010 edited
     
    If you ridden as a messenger in nyc, you would know that skidding does come with the job sometimes with us Brakeless folks.

    I asked Wes M. if he has ridden them.

    Why? Because I see alot of people who get it from second hand knowledge from some one, some report, etc.

    Since he has as well as you, I can talk about it and you would understand what I would be talking about.

    My 17 yrs covers, using in all weather, under stress, flats, using different tires and glue. Real world applications not theory.


    Again this is not a battle but to use my experience to help someone understand tubies and its uses on the street.

    S/F,
    CEYA!
    • CommentAuthorjayohachen
    • CommentTimeJan 29th 2010
     
    Haha, I didn't want to admit in this thread that I've been skidding on my tubulars for as long as I've had them.
    • CommentAuthormikebike
    • CommentTimeMar 10th 2010
     
    dont mean to keep this alive, but im a bit torn. it seems that most of you are very against riding/skidding on a brakeless fixed gear on the road. which makes sense because of the price of tires and the hassle of replacing them. but there are some very informed people who disagree with this statement.
    i am currently considering buying a set of 700c Dura-Ace high flange hubs laced to Araya Aero 1 World Champion rims with 36 double butted spokes. the set is tubular.
    i would be using this set on an njs build that i will primarily be using on the track, but i would like to be able to ride it on the street from time to time as well, and not be worried all the time.
    i suppose just running a brake when i ride on the road would solve most of the issues on here, but you know how i feel about that... i dont know. help?
    also, while im here, any past experience with the wheel set im getting ? any info would be great.
    • CommentAuthorwes m.
    • CommentTimeMar 10th 2010 edited
     
    I think the best option is going to be buying a spare rear wheel. Your track gearing should be significantly higher than your street gearing. You dont want to be changing cogs every time you ride your bike on the street and your hub is single sided. Having a spare clincher wheel solves the skidding and gearing problem.

    Next I would recommend running a brake. Good track tubulars are expensive, no sense in ripping them up on the street.

    I think the worst option is skidding your track tubulars on the street. Your not going to die from it but it still doesnt make a ton of sense.
    • CommentAuthormikebike
    • CommentTimeMar 10th 2010
     
    that seems the most logical. good call on the extra wheel. thats just what ill do. thanks wes
  2.  
    Posted By: mikebikedont mean to keep this alive, but im a bit torn. it seems that most of you are very against riding/skidding on a brakeless fixed gear on the road. which makes sense because of the price of tires and the hassle of replacing them. but there are some very informed people who disagree with this statement.
    i am currently considering buying a set of 700c Dura-Ace high flange hubs laced to Araya Aero 1 World Champion rims with 36 double butted spokes. the set is tubular.
    i would be using this set on an njs build that i will primarily be using on the track, but i would like to be able to ride it on the street from time to time as well, and not be worried all the time.
    i suppose just running a brake when i ride on the road would solve most of the issues on here, but you know how i feel about that... i dont know. help?
    also, while im here, any past experience with the wheel set im getting ? any info would be great.


    You will be fine riding tubular tires on the street. Just get a good quality road tire like Continental Competition, which is light and fast enough for the track, but has a good vectran puncture resistant layer for the street.

    Depending on your gear ratio, you don't need to skid. I ride 48/17 brakeless and NEVER skid to stop. I have strong legs and can slow the bike down just as fast that skidding is not needed.

    I get more flats with clinchers, and have never had a single flat with a tubular tire. I ride both equally on the same terrain.
    • CommentAuthormrymeski
    • CommentTimeMar 10th 2010
     
    I commuted on a set of Superbes to Araya tubulars with worn out conti GP's for an entire summer without ever pumping them or getting a flat. The glue on the tires was 15 years old and falling off in some places.

    Shit's tight. Don't listen to anybody in this thread, just do it!
    • CommentAuthorhenrydec1
    • CommentTimeMar 10th 2010
     
    so i bought a tubular wheel, front only. it is so fast. so much faster than my clincher. i have not ridden any thing but it in a long time. i would run a front on the street. but not the rear.
    • CommentAuthorcyciumx
    • CommentTimeMar 10th 2010
     
    Portland must be a ton more bike friendly than where I'm from - I get a flat once a week on clinchers and once a month on a tubular... a tubular costs a lot more than a new tube
 
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