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    • CommentAuthorRasmus
    • CommentTimeJan 25th 2010
     
    Two questions I’m thinking about running a DedaTre Mondiale Tubular as a everyday front tire, anybody that have tried them? And second why use glue? Doesn’t the new tape work just as good?
  1.  
    I'm sure those tires would be fine. However, I'm a total Continental guy, and feel they make the best tires (well, I think they actually do, according to many tests done on them, including grip, puncture, rolling resistance, weight).

    Any professional shop will surely use glue. I'm sure tape is fine if you're going to try to do it yourself. Look it up on Google, tubular glue vs. tape.
    • CommentAuthorjayohachen
    • CommentTimeJan 25th 2010
     
    • CommentAuthorkaaos
    • CommentTimeJan 25th 2010
     
    I am using Continental Sprinter tubulars for quite a while now... not even thinking of going back to clinchers. Tubulars are fast, very fast and Conti Sprinters have unbelivable grip plus they could be inflated up to 170psi. I started with glue but than moved to Tufo Extreme tape and I find it very reliable and easy to use. Also tape is so easy to take of the rims... once you take off the tire you simply pull and it comes off in a single piece.

    I am thinking of moving to Continental Competition because of extra puncture protection that comes with Vectran layer.
  2.  
    The Competition are also quite abit lighter too, and made to abit higher specification to be more exact. I suggest getting them in 19c size, as they are lighter and less rolling resistance. I'm currently riding two Continental Competition 19x700 tires on my EAI Bareknuckle, front and back, on the street only.
    • CommentAuthorhenrydec1
    • CommentTimeJan 25th 2010
     
    thanks terrible_one i am actually asking for the wheel you are sending, cant wait to get it
  3.  
    By all means, go for it. Gluing tires is not rocket science but requires some practice. The progression is a lot like building a wheel; your first attempt will take three hours, the second one thirty minutes, etc. Also, unless you're riding in nasty, wet weather or extreme temps the type of glue or tape you use won't make much difference provided your tires are properly mounted. If you're paranoid about having to repair flats constantly (though you shouldn't be), I'd recommend keeping a cheap set of clincher wheels on hand for daily commuting and saving the tubulars for weekend pleasure rides. And to second the advice of everyone else - don't skid.
    • CommentAuthorbionnaki
    • CommentTimeJan 25th 2010
     
    do people actually skid on tubulars? what a way to burn money...
    • CommentAuthorkaaos
    • CommentTimeJan 26th 2010
     
    I do only necessary (emergency) skids. I like the art of slowing / stopping without skidding, which takes more energy to do but it's much more efficient.
    Continental sprinters are made with some sort of anti-skidding rubber that helps a lot with braking. Don't use Conti Sprinters if you are after a long skids, this tires will produce probably the shortest skid you can get from a sleek tire.

    @terrible_one49
    Any comments on wear of Competition compared to Sprinter?
    I am aware of their superior puncture protection (vectran) but I am more worried about durability on the road since it's pure competition tire.
  4.  
    I'm quiet certain that the older Sprinter tires do not have the "black chili" compound in the rubber. The Competition do. I've only been riding the Comps for a few weeks now with no noticeable wear or small punctures. These tires are used by a large portion of riders in Tour De France and tons of long distance roadies. I would not worry about them wearing too fast.

    I road with a set of Grand Prix 4000s for over a year, and then passed them onto my GF who has been using them nearly a year...and they are still rolling great, with tons of life in them.


    The fact is that Black Chili will improve our tyres performance in all areas. We can even make a tyre to last longer, yet also grip better and roll faster! The figures are astounding; 26% lower rolling resistance, 30% higher grip, and even 5% longer mileage.

    Black Chili is only made at our factory in Korbach, Germany. No other tyre facility in the world has access to its secrets.

    Black Chlli is a new tread mixture, the result of the latest research from our polymer and raw material laboratories in Hanover, Germany. Continental AG refined newly developed synthetic rubbers with proven natural rubber with powerful profile blends. These are 'nano' sized soot particles, who's surface properties are optimized for use in bicycle tyres. These smaller particles enable the tyre tread to deform around surface objects more quickly, improving grip. They also form a tighter bond with each other thus improving compound strength for improved tread life and less chance for lugs to rip and tear on our MTB tyres. The way in which these particles interact with each other also lowers rolling resistance.
  5.  
    Posted By: Michael PerzBy all means, go for it. Gluing tires is not rocket science but requires some practice. The progression is a lot like building a wheel; your first attempt will take three hours, the second one thirty minutes, etc. Also, unless you're riding in nasty, wet weather or extreme temps the type of glue or tape you use won't make much difference provided your tires are properly mounted. If you're paranoid about having to repair flats constantly (though you shouldn't be), I'd recommend keeping a cheap set of clincher wheels on hand for daily commuting and saving the tubulars for weekend pleasure rides. And to second the advice of everyone else - don't skid.


    If I was riding a good 'drome and putting down some power in the sprints, I would never use tape (at least on the rear wheel). The side loads are going to be too much.

    I did one of my new (old) discs myself and it sucks gluing tubulars. It's just messy all around and the glue sticks to your gloves. That being said, if you just do double layer glue (one on the tire, one on the rim/wheel) and straighten it out, it's really pretty brainless. It's more of a pain to stretch the tires out really.
    • CommentAuthoreaglerock
    • CommentTimeJan 26th 2010
     
    Posted By: terrible_one49I'm quiet certain that the older Sprinter tires do not have the "black chili" compound in the rubber.

    The marketing difficulty with the Black Chili-based tires (2009 and on) is that, while the older rubber formula Conti tires come in a variety of colors, the Black Chili tires are only available in black. But that shouldn't upset anyone but style queens ;-P
  6.  
    Most people that want all those cheesy colors are probably just hipster kids riding clinchers. Anyone seriously enough to be riding tubulars is not going to care about fancy colors.

    In my experience, colored tires wear a lot faster for some reason.

    I would rather have a good tire that grips well, lasts long, and has low rolling resistance....then some fancy color.
    • CommentAuthorjayohachen
    • CommentTimeJan 26th 2010
     
    I don't know, I rather like the gum colored walls on my Vittorias.
  7.  
    HA. I don't think gum walls were what TO49 was referring too. I like them to, they flow nicely with your logos. There, now TO49 can talk shit about gum walls.
  8.  
    Gum walls are SHIT!

    Haha. They fit nicely on vintage bikes, not so hot on newer bikes.
  9.  
    Like white walls on the DeLorean...
    • CommentAuthorjayohachen
    • CommentTimeJan 26th 2010
     
    I didn't like the gummies at first, then I grew to like em. The old codger at my LBS gave me a lecture on how everything is all black nowadays. He said that I'm his only customer with a tubular wheelset.

    Has anyone noticed that some tubulars need to pumped like every two days? I had some Soyo's that were flat after a few days of riding while some haven't had the need for more air after weeks and weeks.
  10.  
    Posted By: jayohachenHas anyone noticed that some tubulars need to pumped like every two days? I had some Soyo's that were flat after a few days of riding while some haven't had the need for more air after weeks and weeks.


    Hmmm....in my experience, no. Actually, quite the opposite! I have to pump up my clinchers every week to keep them at the max PSI. My tubulars stay at max PSI for weeks, no change!
  11.  
    That's gotta be a difference in tubes, not tires.
 
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