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  1.  
    Hey, I was wondering if any of you have reviews on the Affinity frameset. I am thinking about getting one and would like to know how they would be for a daily commuter. Thanks
    • CommentAuthorK3NNY
    • CommentTimeDec 30th 2008
     
    I like there Kissena Track frame. I wanted to buy one but, I opted for a Leader frame. I think I read that the Kissena was a good frame so I guess you could assume there other frames are good. But that might not be a good idea. I hope you find out something though.
    • CommentAuthorJohn Tom
    • CommentTimeJan 2nd 2009
     
    My friend has a low pro and he really likes it, for the price it seems to be a really fast solid frame. Although they aren't as light as they could be. They look real sweet, especially if you get the eggshell white paint and threaded fork. Right now I guess they are on sale for 500 including a head set and bottom bracket. Solid deal. From what I understand it's the most responsive bike he's ever ridden.

    • CommentAuthorJohn Tom
    • CommentTimeJan 2nd 2009
     
    oops those are huge.
    • CommentAuthorK3NNY
    • CommentTimeJan 3rd 2009
     
    Haha yea those pics are massive
  2.  
    thanks for the info! stupid question ,but does he trick on it? I was thinking of doing tricks, but like just wheelies and stuff...
    • CommentAuthorJohn Tom
    • CommentTimeJan 7th 2009
     
    it's definitely harder to do wheelies on them, but people definitely do.
  3.  
    you dont realize how far down your bars are on pursuit bikes until you ride one, toaster.

    i went by the shop the other day and took one for a test ride. they are pretty stiff and very responsive, nice geometry. my only complaint is they charge you extra to thread the steerer cause they come from the factory unthreaded. but that is a personal thing because i dont care for 1'' threadless. they are 500 bucks in the first place, the least you could do is thread it for free.
  4.  
    i have a lo pro with riser bars and i find it fairly easy to wheelie, and very comfortable to ride. i've raced it one the track with drops, and the stance is aggressive, but on the street with risers is the way to go...

    From 2009.05.06_NEV_OpeningNight
    • CommentAuthorLyKqiD
    • CommentTimeJun 17th 2009
     
    1" threadless always made no sense to me. A friend searched around for awhile at the lbs' around the city and found none. Of course ebay remedied that situation.
    • CommentAuthoreaglerock
    • CommentTimeJun 17th 2009
     
    How are you supposed to use one of those cool Cinelli Alter stems if you don't have 1" threadless?
    • CommentAuthorcloud
    • CommentTimeJun 17th 2009 edited
     
    mine has a shim to beef it up to 1 1/8 and it works fine. i daily commute on it and do about 180 miles a week including group rides. i still like it a lot. it could be lighter but it's fast stiff, responsive and i love the agressive geo without crazy toe-verlap. i couldn't tell you about tricking though other than the frame is strong enough for any demand, i bought an extra set of risers for it and still have never slapped em on the replace my nitto rb021 bullhorns. i will tell you every once in awhile, near the end of a 80-90 mile day or one solid 40-50 mile ride i have lower back pain from being dropped into the bulls too long. i'm building up a road bike here shortly to use for the long hilly stuff where this bike doesn't belong anyway.

    also if you get one and build it up nice and clean, expect tons of compliments.
  5.  
    Posted By: ianmichaelyou dont realize how far down your bars are on pursuit bikes until you ride one, toaster.

    i went by the shop the other day and took one for a test ride. they are pretty stiff and very responsive, nice geometry. my only complaint is they charge you extra to thread the steerer cause they come from the factory unthreaded. but that is a personal thing because i dont care for 1'' threadless. they are 500 bucks in the first place, the least you could do is thread it for free.


    Except the Low Pro isn't a pursuit frame, it's just a track frame with a long seat tube and a sloping top tube.

    http://www.affinitycycles.com/images/files/download_specs_sheet_aff.pdf

    Look at the geometry. To get a 57 top tube you're going to get a 60.5cm seat tube. So all you're doing is showing less seat post. If you can do sweet wheeliez on a pista, you can do sweet wheeliez on this bike.

    The sloping top tube was originally developed for bikes with 650c or 24" front wheels from days of yore. Later as these developed, they started making the top tubes lower and horizontal to make stiffer frames (the seat stays would remain high), before the UCI decided that you have to have matching front/rear wheels. This frame is far cry from the original use of horns only TT/pursuit frames where the whole point of horns was just to only have the "drop" section. Then LeMond came around with tri bars, and yadda yadda yadda.

    1" threadless is kind of a remainder of the late 90's and early 2000's. Furthermore, why anyone would WANT a quill stem on a new frame at this point is kinda dumb. Threadless just works that. much. better.
    • CommentAuthorSkidMark
    • CommentTimeJun 18th 2009 edited
     
    Threadless is easier to set up, it's stiffer , and it's stronger. If your stem has a split clamp you can change handlebars without having to remove a grip or unwrap tape, or have a stem for every handlebar.

    This bike would be even better with 1-1/8" threadless.

    The reason that this bike doesn't have toe overlap is because the seat tube angle is greater than the head tube angle. The old KHS Pursuit and Aerotrack have the mad toe overlap because the seat tube angle is a slack 73.5 degrees.
  6.  
    Ok other than the obvious pain in the ass with changing out your bars where do you guys really see the advantages of a threadless stem?
    I'm genuinely curious as I really only thought the advantages in threadless were being able to change out your bars easier and slightly better adjustment capabilities.
    Is having the stem clamped onto the steerer tube actually more structurally sound than having a quill hold it in place from the inside?

    I've never cared much myself. Just kinda go with whatever frame I'm in love with at the time and how it's set up (which most times is classic lugged steel so threaded is the norm for me).
    • CommentAuthorSkidMark
    • CommentTimeJun 18th 2009 edited
     
    It is so much easier to adjust and and it maintains it's adjustment. It's easier to disassemble.

    It is much stronger. Larger diameter=stronger, it's that simple. I was riding BMX in the time of the Tuf-neck, and all you ever did was have your stem rotate, and bend the quill itself. This is like the early 80's before people started going really big with air. The only thing that made that possible was the threadless stem. For the most part you don't really need this on the street, but i think if you are going to consider doing any sort of tricking threadless is the way to go.

    I don't have the attitude that you should shitcan your threaded setup for threadless on any bike. If you are building something new, with VeepDs and other modern shit, then threadless should be in the mix too.
  7.  
    Weight and stiffness. Not to mention being able to very very easily adjust your stem angle/height/length.

    Quill stems are really kludgy solutions in comparison.
    • CommentAuthorSkidMark
    • CommentTimeJun 18th 2009
     
    The think the quill wins on height adjustment: one bolt, no disassembly. But once you settle on a height when to do adjust it again?
  8.  
    Yeah it makes sense. Never really thought about the added strength factor. As far as tricks go unless you call skip stops and trackstands at red lights tricks then I'd count myself out there. Not that I don't find the whole freestyle tarck scene impressive, but it's just never been my thing.
    I ride to get places and go super fast so the type of stem I use is like the last thing I think about. I am however constantly building up bikes for friends and recommending setups so it's good to hear opinions on things I don't know much about.

    Gracias :)
  9.  
    I like my affinity a lot. It's fun to ride around on.
    My only complaint is that the matte white finish becomes impossibly dirty and it very difficult to clean.
    I have given up trying to keep it clean after having it for just over a week now haha.
    Yay for threadless headsets!
 
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