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    • CommentAuthorgreg
    • CommentTimeDec 10th 2009
     
    I had a new experience on the way home tonight: frozen u-lock. I could only get the key turned half-way in my On Guard mini. I had to blow a lot of hot air into the key hole to get the ice melted. After 5 minutes I get everything unfrozen.

    The shackle was frozen to the bar - I dried off the shackle and put some grease on it. Anyone else had this problem?
  1.  
    I carry one if those liquids they sell for cars when you can't spin the key. It like melts the snow. I can imagine you kneeling blowing into the lock. Lol
    • CommentAuthorbionnaki
    • CommentTimeDec 10th 2009 edited
     
    yeah, it happens on the rare occasion.

    I'll take my lighter and heat up the keyhole...w/o burning the lock up, of course.

    I dont use the deicer stuff because I dont want to gunk up the locking mechanism. I have no idea if it does or not...but I dont take the risk when a lighter works well.
  2.  
    Not that it gets that cold around here much, but when it does, I use a lighter as well. I was concerned about damage to the lock, but the guys I know in colder climates do the same without issue. This may seem obvious, but don't spit or pour hot water on the lock. That may help temporarily, but having water in the lock is just going to cause it to freeze again, and worse.
  3.  
    The deicer evaporates pretty quickly.

    I think the long-term answer is probably grease. It'll keep water from getting in there sufficient quantities.

    I've been curious about the uses of spray grease for a while. This seems like a good use.
  4.  
    I forgot to mention, I use a little marine bearing grease in my lock (as well as on my BB, headset cups, seatpost, etc). I don't know how deeply it really penetrates (it is tacky as shit), but I've never had a problem with key turning since.
    • CommentAuthortoroadie
    • CommentTimeDec 10th 2009 edited
     
    Sucks that you were stuck outside in the cold. I can't recommend a particular lock that won't jam / freeze. But you can try redundancy. Two locks connected to each other.

    The chains are 32inch(81cm) and 36inch(91cm) with padlocks it weighs in at 8 pounds (3.6kg). The on guard spring action padlock is convenient, just turn the key and the lock pops open but remains one piece (today it froze). The second padlock is dead simple, no spring, breaks apart into two pieces and freezes / jams less often than the other.
  5.  
    I feel like that setup is more susceptible to intrusion. No?
  6.  
    Wow. That's just under half the weight of my bike.

    I use one of these:

  7.  
    Posted By: Joshua A.C. NewmanWow. That's just under half the weight of my bike.

    I use one of these:




    DONT USE THOSE!!!

    I used one, and one time, me and my friend locked up next to each other, he used one to. We came back to our bikes, and his was gone, with the cable completely cut in half. Mine was halfway cut through. We were even locked up in a fenced off area, and this still happened. The cable on his lock was also much thicker than the one pictured. My point is they are very easy to cut through with the right tools, so be careful with those.
    • CommentAuthoreaglerock
    • CommentTimeDec 10th 2009 edited
     
    Posted By: Joshua A.C. NewmanI use one of these:


    Hey, country mouse! So they don't sell bolt cutters in your hamlet? Or they do, but your local bike thieves are illiterate, so they haven't read how unthiefproof the locally used bike locks are?

    Seriously, looking at a lock like that, and hearing of it used by someone who knows: I find it inspirational. It reminds me of my first stolen bike incident (age 5); I left it lying on the front lawn, and somebody made off with it. A neighbor kid fingered the older brother of another boy in my kindergarten class, and me, my dad, and a 30-person posse from my block walked the two blocks to the 7-year old thief's house, and ratted him out to his mom.

    And swift, savage justice was meted out.

    That presumption that protection is not required, because the universe will step in to remedy the situation - really, it makes me feel all warm and fuzzy.
  8.  
    I didn't used to lock my bike up at all. I hate locks in general, and this is enough lock to keep someone from just picking it up and riding away.

    I used to live in New Haven. I used a U-lock on the rare instances when I didn't bring my bike inside with me. I don't live there any more. Needing to treat the world like it was my enemy is one reason. I'm damn sure many of the homeless would have stood up for me, found my bike if they could, and returned it to me, but the town has a hostility to it that I don't want to live around.

    I've seen stolen bikes around here. They get stolen because the owner didn't lock them up at all, or just looped through the wheel.

    I also see a lot of bikes permanently affixed to fences and bike racks because of a lost key.

    I don't even know where the key to my house is. I don't lock my car. I've had a couple of things stolen from me in my life, but mostly, they were by people I knew. Locking doesn't help with your putative friends.

    In short, the damage done to me by having stuff stolen a couple of times is far less than the damage done to me by myself by treating the whole world with suspicion.
    • CommentAuthortoroadie
    • CommentTimeDec 10th 2009 edited
     
    Posted By: suicide_doorsI feel like that setup is more susceptible to intrusion. No?

    Anything can be cut, but it's worked for me so far [Knock on wood]. It just helps when things get cold or jammed, to have a second option to undo the lock. Sometimes both padlocks jam / freeze, then I just swear, jiggle and pray. What works for you when your lock(s) jam?
  9.  
    I pack it with grease.

    That's my answer for just about any winter biking question, now that I think about it.
    • CommentAuthorRood
    • CommentTimeDec 10th 2009
     
    Posted By: Joshua A.C. NewmanIn short, the damage done to me by having stuff stolen a couple of times is far less than the damage done to me bymyselfby treating the whole world with suspicion.


    +1
  10.  
    Posted By: Joshua A.C. NewmanIn short, the damage done to me by having stuff stolen a couple of times is far less than the damage done to me by myself by treating the whole world with suspicion.

    The entire world? That sounds like a big compromise to make with our far from perfect world and our even further from perfect human nature. More power to you, Josh, but I feel like there is a middle ground between locking things when I'm not around and treating the entire world with suspicion. It's not about the bike itself, it's about the time I have spent with it. That is valuable enough to me to justify a small compromise with the ideal world.
  11.  
    Every key I turn kills me a little. I'm willing to use a lock that will only inconvenience a thief — which has worked fine for years, btw — because it kills me less than carrying around a great big lock.

    Frankly, I'm more afraid of people with more power than me than I am of people with less. Those guys don't care how heavy your lock is.
  12.  
    Posted By: Joshua A.C. NewmanFrankly, I'm more afraid of people withmorepower than me than I am of people with less. Those guys don't care how heavy your lock is.

    I agree with that, to be sure.
    • CommentAuthorwes m.
    • CommentTimeDec 10th 2009
     
    This (like a lot of things) all depends on how you frame the issue. I use a bike lock so I can trust the world. I lock my bike, I trust you wont steal my bike because its locked more securely than the more expensive bike around the block. If I didnt lock my bike then I would have to treat the whole world with suspicion because I'm putting myself in a position to be victimized. Its the "good fences make good neighbors" way of thinking.
  13.  
    Fuck man, my fence makes a good thing for the deer to jump over before they eat the roses.
 
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