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    • CommentAuthordanzap209
    • CommentTimeNov 25th 2009
     
    What does the 35x24F stamped on a rear hub tell me?
  1.  
    That's the hub threading diameter and pitch. That particular hub is threaded Italian, 35mm diameter, 24 TPI.
  2.  
    If you're going to look for a freewheel, I don't know what to tell you. They aren't known for being especially easy to find.
    • CommentAuthordanzap209
    • CommentTimeNov 25th 2009
     
    Can you tell me what to look for?
    • CommentAuthorAaron C
    • CommentTimeNov 25th 2009
     
    a 35x24 freewheel?
    • CommentAuthorAaron C
    • CommentTimeNov 25th 2009 edited
     
    italian thread freewheels

    i found a few others on fleabay, but you're just going to have to look.
    • CommentAuthordanzap209
    • CommentTimeNov 25th 2009
     
    Thanks, Does it have to be Campagnolo?
    • CommentAuthorAaron C
    • CommentTimeNov 25th 2009
     
    just needs to be the correct threading
    • CommentAuthordanzap209
    • CommentTimeNov 25th 2009
     
    Is there a single speed freewheel?
    • CommentAuthordanzap209
    • CommentTimeNov 25th 2009
     
    just curious....
    • CommentAuthorAaron C
    • CommentTimeNov 25th 2009
     
    i have my doubts
  3.  
    Single speed... I really doubt it, but you can certainly look. Italian threads went out about 20 years ago.

    Is this a nice C Record hub that you bought NOS or something? If so, you owe it to the hub to get the right part. If it's just an old hub, the other option you have is to try some English/ISO freewheels on it. The Italian and English threads have the same TPI, but the Italian hub diameter is .08mm larger than ISO. You can gently try to thread and ISO freewheel on there. It has worked for some, but not most. Shit, I meant the opposite: It should work, but sometimes it doesn't. The thing to remember is that if you thread an ISO freewheel on there, you'll most likely never be able to get an Italian one to work again.
    • CommentAuthordanzap209
    • CommentTimeNov 25th 2009
     
    Yeah, I want to change my fixed set up... but it looks like it's going to cost a arm and a leg.
    • CommentAuthordanzap209
    • CommentTimeNov 25th 2009
     
    What does the "F" stand for?
    • CommentAuthoreaglerock
    • CommentTimeNov 26th 2009 edited
     
    There are two common freewheel thread patterns*: British (1.37" diameter, 24tpi) and Italian (35mm diameter, 24 TPI, as s_d has already mentioned). As a practical matter, you can thread British-thread freewheels onto Italian-thread hubs, and vice versa; but once you've done that, you're sort of committed to the change, or you'll mess the threads up to the point that you can't get any freewheel to stick. British freewheels are more common floating out in the world, because most Japanese hub manufacturers (Suntour and Shimano, mostly) used British threading for their own freewheel hubs. Italian-threaded freewheels were available from all the big manufacturers; but only the Italian manufacturers (Regina, Miche, Campagnolo, O.M.A.S., Caimi among others) made more Italian-thread than British.

    Italian-wise, I like the Reginas, especially the Regina Oro, Regina Extra and Regina America. I have a 7-speed Regina Synchro-S on my Bianchi that I've given my usual treatment: Fill it with Phil Wood Tenacious Oil until it drips out, which makes the freewheel mechanism dead silent. But technologically, the Suntour freewheels stomp all the European freewheels stupid. From the catalog scans I've seen, Suntour never made an Italian-thread freewheel, although they did make French ones back in the '70s, when there were French-thread bikes floating all over the US (I owned about five Motobecanes over a period of 3-4 years. The SF East Bay was a Frenchy-centric region: Peugeot at the top end, Gitane at the bottom, and Motobecane filling the broad middle).

    There are tons of used freewheels around, and a lot of them are in perfectly usable condition. I have freewheels on three of my current bikes. All the freewheels were used when I got them from the local bike kitchen; I didn't pay more than $8 for any of them, and they're all fine. What's available in your area will depend on your sources.

    There aren't a lot of new freewheels manufactured; Sunrace makes cheapies, and IRD makes allegedly good ones. As far as I know, both brands are British-threaded. Harris Bikes Sheldon's employer, has a comprehensive description of the variety that's currently available. Rivendell carries a variety of 6-speed and 7-speed IRD freewheels. Loose Screws in Ashland OR has Shimano and Sunrace freewheels, 5/6/7/8 speed. 5-speed and Ultra-6 (narrow-spaced) are for 120mm rear hubs; standard 6/7-speed are for 126mm rear hubs; 8-speed is for 130mm freewheel rear.

    As always, start with Sheldon's explanations, as linked in the footnote below.

    *Okay, there's actually a third common freewheel thread pattern: French thread (34.7mm diameter, 1mm thread). Aside from the occasional old Campagnolo French-threaded rear hub, practically all French-thread hubs are from French manufacturers - Normandy, Maillard, Maxicar, Atom and a lot of other names you've never heard of. Don't go down this road unless you're forced to do so.

    EDIT, now that I've read all the stuff posted while I was writing this: Campagnolo produced a limited range of aluminum-cog freewheels (6-speed only, I think). Super-expensive; fetish-worthy; requires a special freewheel removal tool that doesn't work with anything else. You're unlikely to get one for less than $150, regardless of condition. I could see the point if you were getting yourself into retro-racing, where there were actual cash prizes for winning. Otherwise, it's a pretty expensive trinket.
  4.  
    Dammit, I updated my post just as you posted that, eaglerock. Goof=me.

    Anyway, the F:
    English/ISO hubs are 24T threaded, with the threads at 60-degrees. Italian hubs are 24F, with the threads at 55-degrees. I believe that is the significance of T and F, but I am only guessing. Again, I have never actually used any of this stuff, just read about it.
  5.  
    I should say that my guess is about the significance of the letters, not of the angles. I know the angles are correct. I just can't find anything anywhere to prove or disprove my letter theory. Anyone?
    • CommentAuthoreaglerock
    • CommentTimeNov 26th 2009
     
    Posted By: suicide_doorsDammit, I updated my post just as you posted that, eaglerock. Goof=me.

    I'm not fast, but I'm thorough.
  6.  
    You can say that again. Do you know what the F stands for?
  7.  
    [email protected]*^% this Italian annoyance ;)
 
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