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  1.  
    Its getting colder, and I was wondering what would be the best to get for riding in the cold. Any suggestions?
  2.  
    Layers. Always layers. I like to rock dri-fits underneath my pants, thick socks, thermal shirt under a t-shirt under a zip up under a weatherproof jacket when called for. Warm waterproof gloves, knit cap on top of my cycling cap (covers ears and keeps head toasty), and last but not least a bandanna around my neck so when it gets really bitter I can pull it up over my mouth for some added face protection and warmth from my breath.
    Some will tell you to head straight down to your nearest REI and spend a week's pay on whatever ultra-light-hyper-water-resistant-dual-gortex-patented gear they're selling now but I just feel it's entirely a waste of good money you should be spending getting your bike sorted out for the winter (if you've got snow) or taking out the mildly decent looking hipster girl who serves you coffee in the morning.
    Most importantly though layer. It'll keep you warmer than anything else and give you options if you find yourself getting too toasty. A t-shirt and a big coat is about the dumbest thing anyone can wear in cold weather.
  3.  
    Allllllso if you have the option try gearing down a bit in the winter. It'll keep your cadence up nice and high which will in turn keep you warmer. If you ride a fixed gear (which I can now see that you do) you may wanna consider a smaller chainring for the coldest months. Jersey ain't no joke in the wintertime so give yourself every advantage you can.
    Luckily you ride a Steamroller (according to your profile) so tossing a nice set of fat ass studded tires (get Nokians) won't be an issue. Once you start seein ice on the ground you'll be very happy you're riding on the right kinda rubber. And of course if you don't already have them you'll want some fenders so you don't get snow and mud splashing all over you.
    Oh and lights.. hella good lights are a must in the winter. People drive like shit and can't see anything so you wanna be as visible as possible.

    Haha, ok I think that's all the advice I got. Have fun.
  4.  
    dude,....serious?
    well here is my suggestion.. fixie fashion couture look for fall/winter 09' ...been seen mashing down boulevard in a pair of wool skinny jeans with a leather bomber jacket, accessorize with accent color bennie, messenger bag, and full finger riding gloves
    ....oh new tires also
    • CommentAuthorwes m.
    • CommentTimeSep 30th 2009
     
    Go down to the local surplus store and buy wool gloves, sweaters, scarfs, caps, socks, long undies etc. Wool is where its at, it worked for thousands of years before all of this gortex shmortex this and that. a) cheap b) warm c) 10000% drier than cotton d) breathes. You should use a shell layer on top of your wool when its raining.

    Listen to me and jaiden, layer your wool.
  5.  
    I have been thinking about the same thing.I have got the top part covered (rain jacked shell, bunches of stuff to layer with), but I am commuting more than 5 minutes by bike this year and living in Seattle, thats more than enough time to get drenched (making sitting through classes more than unpleasant). I have been toying with the idea of getting some waterproof pants, but I don't know if I can bring myself to wear them. They all seem like they are too big and bulky to be comfortable to ride in. Does anyone here actually use them?
  6.  
    Wes, as much as I love wool goodies for the winter, most wool just doesn't cut it for biking up here in Western Massachusetts.

    That said, my favorite winter socks are Smartwool. All the benefits of wool, but they don't bunch up, they wick sweat, and they're super toasty. They're pricey — like $10 a pair — but they're fantastic.

    But that's pretty much the only wool I wear. As it gets cool, I often wear a pair of arm warmers — I can take them off when I arrive — and eventually knee warmers.

    Then I switch to tights. Non-cycling pants already suck to ride, and when you start layering, they suck even more. One seam on your perineum is bad enough. Several is awful.

    I wear baggy shorts over my tights. That way, I have pockets and a windbreak, but no cuffs to get in the chain. When it's really awful, I wear the knee warmers with the tights and shorts.

    I usually wear a long undershirt under a T shirt (just because I like T shirts with funny things on them), then a light, water-resistant jacket over that. I usually unzip it about 5 minutes into my ride because I'm so hot.

    I wear a bandana over my face and another on my head. The one on my face keeps the ice away from my nose and mouth and the one on my head is just the right amount of windbreak and insulation.

    And gloves. Trek used to make these awesome winter biking gloves. They were $18 on Ebay. I got a couple of pair, but lost them in April twice, when I didn't remember to put them on once the day had warmed up.

    Seriously, don't wear multiple gloves or socks. They cut off the circulation to your hands and feet. You need your blood to move. It's your oxygen and your system to move heat around your body. Likewise, make sure shirts and jackets don't bunch up in your armpits for the same reason.

    So, yes, wear layers of stuff you can unzip on the fly. At best, it's thin stuff.
  7.  
    Posted By: wes m.Go down to the local surplus store and buy wool gloves, sweaters, scarfs, caps, socks, long undies etc. Wool is where its at, it worked for thousands of years before all of this gortex shmortex this and that. a) cheap b) warm c) 10000% drier than cotton d) breathes. You should use a shell layer on top of your wool when its raining.

    Listen to me and jaiden, layer your wool.


    I'm gonna have to say Wes is 100% correct about wool. Thing for me is I'm vegan so wool isn't an option but if you're not held back by any type of restrictions on what materials you can and can't purchase wool is always going to be the best thing you can layer yourself with in the winter.



    Posted By: Steven BellI have been thinking about the same thing.I have got the top part covered (rain jacked shell, bunches of stuff to layer with), but I am commuting more than 5 minutes by bike this year and living in Seattle, thats more than enough time to get drenched (making sitting through classes more than unpleasant). I have been toying with the idea of getting some waterproof pants, but I don't know if I can bring myself to wear them. They all seem like they are too big and bulky to be comfortable to ride in. Does anyone here actually use them?


    Yah know you'd be surprised by how well dri-fits actually work. I used to live in Portland so dealing with moisture was a daily thing and a pair of dri-fits under my jeans did me a world of good. Keeps your legs nice and warm and also dry. Your outer layer might get a little damp but you really won't notice till you get home and start peeling things off. They're usually made for winter running but they work damn decent for cyclists too.
  8.  
    Posted By: Joshua A.C. Newman
    I wear baggy shorts over my tights. That way, I have pockets and a windbreak, but no cuffs to get in the chain. When it's really awful, I wear the knee warmers with the tights and shorts.

    I usually wear a long undershirt under a T shirt (just because I like T shirts with funny things on them), then a light, water-resistant jacket over that. I usually unzip it about 5 minutes into my ride because I'm so hot.

    I wear a bandana over my face and another on my head. The one on my face keeps the ice away from my nose and mouth and the one on my head is just the right amount of windbreak and insulation.

    And gloves. Trek used to make these awesome winter biking gloves. They were $18 on Ebay. I got a couple of pair, but lost them in April twice, when I didn't remember to put them on once the day had warmed up.


    I think me and Josh probably look like the same dude out there in the winter :)
  9.  
    i use one of those ski masks for my face it keeps me completely warm

  10.  
    do you think that military surplus is too bulky? i usually wear that stuff because I run an airsoft league here in jersey. i usually stay away from it cause i don't want to look like a total douche.
  11.  
    thanks iron jaiden, appreciate the feedback on that.
    • CommentAuthorAaron C
    • CommentTimeOct 1st 2009
     
    i really don't know what the weather is like in jersey during the winter but: start with fewer layers than you think you'll need, by the time you're 10min into your ride you'll be warm in basically any clothing in all but the worst conditions.

    pearl izumi lobster claw mits are excellent when its really cold.
    if you have any real distance to go on your commute the extra power you get from clipless pedals pay off double in the winter-just find some warm ones, or tape off the biggest vents.
    ski goggles are a must in cold weather (esp below 15*), when (if) it gets down to -20 to -30 below do not expose any skin on you face. usually when it is below -5* or -10* (+windchill) i will wear an extra long fleece gator sort of like this one except mine is more like a hood. i then put on a knit wool hat, goggles, wrap a nice wool scarf around the whole thing, and then cinch up the drawstring on the gator so that it is tight around my goggle!
    i look like a snow mummy but this is the best thing i have found so far.

    if you are not riding in quite that cold of weather i'd still recommend goggles but a snowmobile face mask probably would work just fine.
    • CommentAuthorAaron C
    • CommentTimeOct 1st 2009
     
    Posted By: BoardsofTwoismdo you think that military surplus is too bulky?


    yea you'll be miserable. if it is still reasonably warm (like 20*+) a nice heavy flannel shirt (they cut wind great and still breathe) + an insulated vest work great.

    also i hate hoods in the winter, just don't do it.


    finally i suppose most of my argument is couched on MN winters, i have no idea what an east coast winter is like, if it is overly wet you probably shouldn't listen to me...
    • CommentAuthorLyKqiD
    • CommentTimeOct 1st 2009
     
    Reading through here makes me love savannah even more. My winter is most peoples spring.
    • CommentAuthorsfbee
    • CommentTimeOct 1st 2009
     
    Posted By: LyKqiDReading through here makes me love savannah even more. My winter is most peoples spring.


    Roger that. Living in Houston, I might have to throw on a thermal in January... otherwise it's shorts and t-shirts all the way :)
    • CommentAuthorwes m.
    • CommentTimeOct 1st 2009
     
    Posted By: BoardsofTwoismthanks iron jaiden, appreciate the feedback on that.


    I guess it depends on what your buying at the store. Im lucky to live 1 block from the best surplus shop in the bay area. IMO the swiss ski patrol has got their warmth/functionality ratio on point. They actually sell a lot of tighter fitting and lighter stuff thats designed to be layered, hence no particular layer is bulky. It only gets bulky when you have to wear a lot of stuff but when its that cold you are wearing a lot of stuff no matter what it is.
    • CommentAuthorfixedpuch
    • CommentTimeOct 1st 2009
     
    I heart my arm and leg warmers.
    • CommentAuthordmdeford
    • CommentTimeOct 1st 2009 edited
     
    Posted By: wes m.Go down to the local surplus store and buy wool gloves, sweaters, scarfs, caps, socks, long undies etc. Wool is where its at, it worked for thousands of years before all of this gortex shmortex this and that. a) cheap b) warm c) 10000% drier than cotton d) breathes. You should use a shell layer on top of your wool when its raining.

    Listen to me and jaiden, layer your wool.


    most definitely, wes. i guess i'm a bit of a wool snob. if you have the money, icebreaker makes great stuff. also, check out rivbike.com, they've got great wool jerseys for relatively cheap.
  12.  
    I live in Florida. You have no idea how much I long to not have to wear shorts. Until today, the last day it was under 85 F was in may.
 
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