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    • CommentAuthorJameson_C
    • CommentTimeSep 23rd 2009
     
    I am starting a new fixie project. I have a couple questions seeing as i am relatively new to this. First, I am wondering what the benefits of a lugged frame are. Strength? Weight? I have seen alot of lugged road frames that are relativeley cheap, but the dont have track drop outs. How hard are they to convert to fixed? I have seen alot of old NJS lugged track frames which are beautiful but they are pretty pricey. Considering the bike will be fixed, what are the pros and cons versus an old lugged road bike and lugged track frame, if any?
    • CommentAuthorLyKqiD
    • CommentTimeSep 23rd 2009
     
    Lugged Track Frame
    More upright frame angles
    Tight geometry
    Not designed/drilled for brakes
    Tight tire clearance
    No Fenders
    Expensive as shit
    Toe overlap
    Light weight
    Track ends

    Lugged Road Frame
    Comfortable geometry
    Large tire clearances
    Brake mountable
    Usually cheap
    Not as aggressive of stance
    Less street cred
    Less respect on fixed gear sites
    Older/heavier
    Needs horizontal dropouts


    Sheldon Brown can help you with all your converting needs, just click HERE.
  1.  
    They are in two completely different classes. Lugged track is at the high end, lugged road conversion is at the absolute bottom. That isn't to say that you can't compare the two, but you shouldn't even consider lugged track at your experience level.

    The only reason to convert an old road frame is if you already have one or can get one of reasonable quality for very cheap (think less than $100). Otherwise you will end up spending the same amount converting it (in time and money) that you would spend on a complete fixed specific bike.

    If you are going to buy a frame anyway, you're better off buying a Kilo (tight budget) or an IRO (less tight). Both are great for beginning fixed riding and will be easy to swap parts off of when you want to upgrade.
    • CommentAuthorJameson_C
    • CommentTimeSep 23rd 2009
     
    Do you think that I would have trouble riding a nice lugged track frame? Im of the school that you should get something of the best quality that you can afford. Seems like if I can build the best fixie i can afford now that ill be able to ride it forever. Whats the story on bareknuckle frames? the IRO or kilo seem cheap to me (quality wise). What about Soma or any affinity? Sorry for the newbie questions...
  2.  
    Just curious what size are you looking for? what is your budget, also, will you be using brakes?
    • CommentAuthorfilthpunx
    • CommentTimeSep 23rd 2009
     
    get an iro or a mercier.you seem to new to cycling for you to benefit from a keirin frame.besides, you wouldnt want to fuck up a $600+ frame crashing into something from not being able to stop would ya?
    • CommentAuthormmediaman
    • CommentTimeSep 23rd 2009
     
    for the cheap, look at old road criterium frames. they have tighter geometries and small wheel bases. perfect for a fixed conversion.
  3.  
    I am a nice person, so please don't take this like some insane rant. Obviously you're looking for help and it's great that you are asking questions. But...
    Posted By: Jameson_CIm of the school that you should get something of the best quality that you can afford.

    Oh my god. If you don't know the difference between a lugged road frame and a lugged track frame and are asking for a comparison, you shouldn't be saying shit like that. How the hell would you know anything about build quality on two frames you've never seen before? Even if you had seen and ridden them, what would make you think they were cheap or low quality?

    A lot of people who are completely cherry to fixed gear riding come on here, throw a bunch of brand names around and assert that they need top quality components and frames for playing the city rider game. What the hell for? At this point, you can spend $350-$600 and get a complete bike which will teach you what you need to know about fixed riding. It will work completely correctly if you treat it right. You're going to crash your bike at some point. This way, you will be able to crash it and not feel too bad. Not to mention the fact that you would have no idea what the differences are between $350 bikes and $1500 bikes.

    You're welcome to spend a grand on a new bike which you know absolutely nothing about. It's your money. But it would behoove you to realize that, no matter how experienced you are with road biking, you know shit about riding fixed before you go and do that. You need to start small and take advice if you solicit it.
    • CommentAuthorLyKqiD
    • CommentTimeSep 23rd 2009 edited
     
    At the end of the day I do agree with you suicide, however, just like in the other thread there are those that believe:
    Buy something great and you will only buy it once. Buy something shitty and you will inevitably replace it.
    Both are right in some ways.
    However in your case jameson it would seem that you really wouldnt be able to appreciate the differences between an Kilo TT and a Bareknuckle. Though we all want a ride with some ammount of street cred.
  4.  
    Well, it's what I said in the other thread, that philosophy makes sense for an (at least semi-)experienced rider. That kind of upgrading is worth doing right. But to start out with top end components is ridiculous. There is no way to take that kind of person seriously.
    • CommentAuthorsfbee
    • CommentTimeSep 23rd 2009
     
    Posted By: suicide_doorsThere is no way to take that kind of person seriously.
  5.  
    Oh my.
  6.  
    Oh my is right.....
    • CommentAuthorGone
    • CommentTimeSep 23rd 2009 edited
     
    Posted By: LyKqiDLugged Track Frame
    More upright frame angles
    Tight geometry
    Not designed/drilled for brakes
    Tight tire clearance
    No Fenders
    Expensive as shit
    Toe overlap
    Light weight
    Track ends

    The most important feature of a track frame is the height of the bottom bracket shell, usually they are 1cm to 1 1/2 higher then a road frame. The head tube angle is more aggressive but it can be debated. The reason connoisseur prefer vintage steel lugged pista frame is the aggressive geometry which you will not find on a concept frame, another advantage is steel is more refined and flexible then aluminum making the ride more comfortable. Now you have a good idea why the higher price tag of a vintage Italian or Japanese steel lugged frame. Alloy concepts "circus bikes" frames are for wheelie's and tricks, steel lugged frames are for serious rides. I know I'm gonna get creamed for this but it's a fact.
    • CommentAuthorLyKqiD
    • CommentTimeSep 23rd 2009
     
    I might have nightmares...
  7.  
    that looked like some one who was drunk or baked
    • CommentAuthorwes m.
    • CommentTimeSep 23rd 2009 edited
     
    "Alloy concepts frames are for wheelie's and tricks"

    Rabbi might murder you in your sleep tonight.
    • CommentAuthorSkidMark
    • CommentTimeSep 23rd 2009 edited
     
    I'm sure there's some older lugged criterium frames out there with geometry just as aggressive as a track bike's...

    I used to poo-poo conversions. I still hate faux track bikes: conversions with no handbrakes made to look like track bikes. What I do like is fixed gear road bikes, made for touring or commuting. It's not even really a conversion considering there used to be bikes available like this stock, before derailleurs became popular (before WWII).

    And Gone, you should get to a velodrome to see people killin' it on their Pista Concepts...
  8.  
    I like the road conversions I have had, and or maybe will still do. The guerciotti that I had built up, it had a very tight geo and it was a road conversion, that frame was from the mid 80's, alot of those frames from that time had a pretty tight geo from what I can tell, and have seen in person, but still doesnt compare to a real genuine track geo...

    Im still no absolute expert here, still learning alot, but I have come as far to know the difference between the feel of steel alum carbon etc, and difference between track and road frames, the geo's and all that jazz.....
    • CommentAuthordanzap209
    • CommentTimeSep 23rd 2009
     
    Everyone has to start somewhere, right? Why not on a decent conversion....
 
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