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    • CommentAuthorAeroAceV03
    • CommentTimeOct 26th 2008 edited
     
    what cog sizes go with what chain wheels ?

    lets say a 16t cog with a 44t chain wheel

    what combination do you prefer when it comes to doing tricks?

    what combination makes it easier to lift up your bike?

    whats the most sensible combination?

    thoughts please
    • CommentAuthort0dk0n
    • CommentTimeOct 26th 2008 edited
     
    http://hikerd.googlepages.com/skidpatchcalc
    44:16 is a terrible gear ratio if you're pulling skids a lot. 17 and 19t cogs are the most versatile for most chainrings. It gives you either 34 or 38 skid patches altogether around the whole wheel. I personally run a 44:17 ratio, gets me up most the tough hills in SF, lets me throw skids easily when I bomb hills, still allows me to go pretty fast on downhill and flat, etc. I used to retardedly run a 48:16 gear ratio, which only had one skid patch around the whole wheel. It ripped my first tire through after 3 weeks, then my second one in about 2... Now my tire still has a few months on it with the 44:17 ratio.
    • CommentAuthorAeroAceV03
    • CommentTimeOct 26th 2008
     
    what are your views on a 44/20?

    i know it sounds bizarre

    but ive been running this for a while now

    i got good speed/GREAT skids

    but i cant lift my lady up

    idk if its because my cog has too many teeth
  1.  
    52:19
    • CommentAuthorHOPE
    • CommentTimeOct 26th 2008 edited
     
    im at 46/16 seems like a great ratio so far, i havent tried many others
    • CommentAuthort0dk0n
    • CommentTimeOct 26th 2008
     
    AeroAceV03: 44:20 only has 5 skid patches on each side of the tire... I think a lower cog will help you lift it up, I know I can sort of get my bike up with my 17t cog, but I'm still learning to wheelie... Look at that chart I linked to you though, but I suggest 19 if you don't want to lose your speed, but still skid a lot, 17 if you want to do wheelies and the like. But then again, I'm not so sure what a good gear ratio would be for wheelies...
    • CommentAuthorgarrett
    • CommentTimeOct 26th 2008 edited
     
    I'm running 48/18 and I don't like it all that much. I'm getting more into the trick side of riding, and it's pretty hard to get the front wheel up and to skid while in the saddle. I'm going to get a new chainring rather than a cog just because it's easier and cheaper. I think I'll go with a 44t and see how that works out. Anybody have any suggestions for what to pair with an 18t cog?
    • CommentAuthorAeroAceV03
    • CommentTimeOct 26th 2008
     
    so the more patches the better huh? i dont get how that works , i might go with a 17 since it gices me 17

    the more patches the longer the tire last?

    i might just get some risers or some other bars to help me lift my bike
    • CommentAuthorOtto Rax
    • CommentTimeOct 26th 2008
     
    50-16 for cruising
    49-18 for tricking
    • CommentAuthormeatroll
    • CommentTimeOct 26th 2008
     
    man, whenever people blow like 2 g's on their bike and still end up with a 48x16 ratio, it puts a smile on my face.
    here's a chart that tells you both skid patches AND gear inches:
    • CommentAuthoralexv
    • CommentTimeOct 26th 2008
     
    anyone interested in the trick aspects of these bikes should check out this great forum:

    tricktrack.freeforums.org

    we have lots of riders who want to help people of all skill levels advance their techniques and what not!!
    • CommentAuthort0dk0n
    • CommentTimeOct 26th 2008
     
    meatroll, I dropped only 300 on my first bike with a 48:16 ratio :P. The current one, I got smart and did more research in what I should do with it... First bike was all generic crap (except the KMC chain, I guess), aluminum frame that cracked in a month of owning it, etc. Anyways, I didn't drop 1.3g on my current bike to end up with a 48:16 ratio ;).

    AeroAceV03, Sheldon Browns site (http://www.sheldonbrown.com/fixed.html#skid) has an explanation on skid patches and how to calculate it yourself. But yeah, the more skid patches, the better, for your tire anyway. Especially if you ride brakeless and half the time depend on skid stops. If you use both sides to skid, then you'll double the amount of skid patches you have, so if you have a 17t cog, you'll have 34 skid patches around the entire tire. Risers might help actually, but you can learn to do wheelies on drops, bull horns, straight bars, etc... Its more of a preference of what you like to use while riding in the majority of the time. You can always adapt to do other things with the bars, but keep to what you're comfortable with, and if it is risers, then all the power to you :).
    • CommentAuthorgarrett
    • CommentTimeOct 26th 2008
     
    alexv, thanks for the link, I just joined that site
    • CommentAuthorpockmark
    • CommentTimeOct 26th 2008 edited
     
    i've ran 48x16 on my old kilo tt, 50x17 on my fuji track pro, 49x17 on my fuji track...daily ridden throughout d.c./md/va

    current setup is 48x15

    i rode 42x17 at one point and just spun out alot while riding...but it was a very relaxed gear ratio overall.
  2.  
    i was running 42/16, but now i run 48/17
    and it is a lot better for me
    i can ride faster
    hills arnt too bad
    i like it
    • CommentAuthorAeroAceV03
    • CommentTimeOct 27th 2008
     
    thanks t0dk0n and alex v,those links really helped me . Now i understand that whole concept. The forums was a good addition to velospace.
    • CommentAuthorESR
    • CommentTimeOct 27th 2008
     
    use to ride 52:18 and liked it alot

    now i have a 42 tooth chain ring. should i go with a 14 or 15 cog?
    • CommentAuthorebrep1
    • CommentTimeOct 27th 2008
     
    42:15=5 skid patches, 42:14=2 skid patches, you decide
    • CommentAuthorAeroAceV03
    • CommentTimeOct 28th 2008
     
    either way your fckud hehe

    44/17!
  3.  
    yup ride 49/16...that gives you 16 skid patches and 82 inches per rev and keeps your legs in shape
 
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