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  1.  
    Who's riding them on the back ?
    Pros/Cons ?
    • CommentAuthoreaglerock
    • CommentTimeAug 10th 2009
     
    You mean these?

    I've run the 26" version on my mountain bike/townie/beater for three years. They're heavy, but they take a beating. I've pulled nailheads, thorns, screws, wire barbs, chunks of glass out of them. The tires are fine, and I've never flatted a tube due to tire failure (I've flatted them through other bonehead moves, but...)

    I'm pricing out a 700x35 set for my touring bike.
    • CommentAuthorthe rabbi
    • CommentTimeAug 10th 2009
     
    con-low psi rating
  2.  
    I just got my first so I can't help too much as a full review

    BUT...

    I love it. I have had it for about a week and half now and I commute everyday with it. And in this past week I have dealt with heavy rain and it stayed gripping through the wet corners and everything. As far as skidding with it (if you ride brakeless), it could be better but it isn't bad at all. I bomb a pretty big hill everyday to work and it's holding up great so far. Maybe not as good as my Soma Everwears but it's pretty close.

    One down side that I noticed right away deals with the fact that the max PSI is 85. Being used to riding with 135 PSI, i felt the difference right away and took some getting used to because it always feels like my tire is flat.

    Overall, I'm very satisfied with the Randonneur. But it's all about what your looking for with this tire...

    hope this helps a bit
    • CommentAuthoreaglerock
    • CommentTimeAug 10th 2009 edited
     
    Posted By: the rabbicon-low psi rating

    Posted By: brooklynbombsOne down side that I noticed right away deals with the fact that the max PSI is 85.

    Depends on the tire width, of course; the 700x28 is rated to 90PSI, and my 559x40s are rated to 70PSI. However, I routinely pump mine up to 80 without issues, especially in the rear - and I often carry 20-30 pound loads in the rear panniers. I'd guess you can overinflate the 700c tires as well.
  3.  
    well it has a very low psi rating
    but other than that these are amazing tires
    they will last you a very long while ive had mine for about a year and i skid on it alot and its still not even down to the red layer
    but the white on this tire gets an ugly cream color after a few months
    • CommentAuthorcarlcastro
    • CommentTimeAug 11th 2009
     
    I just got one on my rear (700x28) and had the bike shop put it on because it's near impossible to take any tire on or off the rims I have. And when I checked the PSI the next day, they put it up to 100psi. It's rate for 85PSI. Would it be bad if I kept running it at 100PSI? I got the tire for free, and I was wanting to get gatorskins, but I couldn't pass up on this free rando so I'm stuck with this for a while. What are bad things that happen if I run the PSI over the max PSI? Blow outs? Wear out faster? Lemme know cause right now I'm not too concerned with how long this tire will last.
  4.  
    Sheldon knows all. To summarize: start with the recommended tire pressure and experiment. Read the pros and cons.
    • CommentAuthorKyle No 27
    • CommentTimeAug 11th 2009
     
    Posted By: scottybonessswell it has a very low psi rating
    but other than that these are amazing tires
    they will last you a very long while ive had mine for about a year and i skid on it alot and its still not even down to the red layer
    but the white on this tire gets an ugly cream color after a few months


    You got a year out of it? I've had mine for a little over 3 months and the red layer is showing in about 6 spots. Michigan roads are pretty friggin' gnarly but damn, a year? I also run mine at a little over 100 psi. Could that affect the longevity?
  5.  
    yes kyle , how much i cant say. but think about the shape of the tire, at 80psi(flat) and now at 100(a little more sharp)
    now think about knives, the sharper the knife the quicker i dulls or flatens, there is less marerial so it is easyer to take away some of it there for dulling it. and when it is dull there is more material to take away at once so it still takes away the same amount of metal or the tire for this case but it takes it away at a more horisontal angle and not more of a vertical angle, make sense? probably not.
  6.  
    thanks brooklyn; for the input
    i forgot about the low psi rating on randonneurs, anyone else have advice on semi long-lasting skid-ables ?
    everwears... sidewall issues ?
    gatorskins ?
    rubino pros ?
  7.  
    I have rode and gone through about 4 everwears and have not had one sidewall problem. I kept them at 130psi and didn't "dandy" around with them at all so I'm not sure what people did wrong to have their sidewalls blow out. I personally like the tire a lot and if you want something that will last a long time for skidding, this is probably the best bet. I go through one a month...sometimes a little longer...and thats with commuting everyday and getting skid-happy down a hill that I have to ride every day (work is at the bottom of that hill).
    • CommentAuthorAaron C
    • CommentTimeAug 12th 2009
     
    Posted By: Joshua A.C. NewmanSheldonknows all. To summarize: start with the recommended tire pressure and experiment. Read the pros and cons.


    i've always been hesitant with overdoing tire pressure. a couple of years ago i was riding a pair of folding hutchinsons (i cant remember the model, they had 2? grey strips through the tread) overinflated by about 10-15psi, i think it was like 120-125psi on a 110psi rated tire (i believe). at the time i was doing a lot of endurance training on the road, with about 5mi left on a 30mi ride i started my last sprint, got up to around 30 (can't remember)

    and BANG.

    i blew the sidewall out of the tire. these were new tires. maybe 300mi on them.

    the bead didn't pop out the tire literally tore away from it.

    i went down super hard.

    had to walk 5mi with massive roadrash.

    if you do it just be careful.
  8.  
    A sidewall blowout at 10-15 psi over is a defect. I don't know if it's one the manufacturer would cover, though.

    I have Continental Grand Prix 4 Seasons on my Tyger Tyger. A crash on the previous bike tore up the kevlar on the side of the front (and did in that frame) but it seems to live very happily at 120 psi. I'll replace the tire when I've got the cash for it, but it seems just fine for now.
    • CommentAuthorasmorse211
    • CommentTimeAug 14th 2009
     
    I have ultra gator skins and I blew a freakin tire last night. The guys at the local bike shop know me and hooked them up half price, but I can't understand how it punctured. I was in a bike lane and couldn't see any glass or any other debris that would cause it and I'm just so pissed my gator skin tire is damaged.
  9.  
    You might have had something stuck in before that finally worked its way through. That's happened to me.
    • CommentAuthorasmorse211
    • CommentTimeAug 14th 2009
     
    it was strange though because it didn't affect the tube, but even with a boot it wouldn't hold pressure. it's the tiniest little puncture so I'm going to fix it, but it's very frustrating for such expensive tires. I'm thinking of getting a kevlar tire liner despite the weight and cost.
  10.  
    It only takes a little tiny hole. Did you check the spot on the tire that matches the spot on the tube with the puncture? You might still have a little piece of glass in there.
    • CommentAuthorAaron C
    • CommentTimeAug 15th 2009
     
    Posted By: Joshua A.C. NewmanA sidewall blowout at 10-15 psi over is a defect.


    oh most definitely, but you never know when that shit is going to happen.

    would the tire have still blown out at correct operating pressure? maybe.

    did over-inflating it hasten its demise? probably?

    was that the scariest experience i've had on a bike? yes.
  11.  
    The scariest experiences I've had on a bike, I haven't been conscious for.
 
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