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  1.  
    So I have been brainstorming for a while about a facet of the bike industry that is arguably non-existant. As long as I have been in school, I've been doodling, and these doodles progressed to intricate drawings, and they soon became the only facet in which I was really able to express my creativity, as I have no other artistic talent. Obviously, most of my drawings were of bikes, bike frames, parts, etc. I also have played around a lot with BikeCAD in conjuction with other programs to a similar point. These drawings and designs are almost all aesthetically based, that is to say that they are mostly created with an eye to the way they look and not necissarily to how practical they would be if they were real. But it seems to me that wild, one-off custom bikes are really lacking at places like Interbike and NABHS. And I mean like wild, crazy, impractical, innovative bikes. I must say that I feel all bikes should be ridden, and that looks are important, but not everything. In the car industry we see a huge number of concept cars that are in no way like a car anyone would actually use, but they are beautiful, pieces of art, and they are special. It seems to me that the cycling industry has very few bikes that are truly special, and I mean really special in the fact that someone labored over it to make it their own. There are some, and I'm sure that many people who have built their own frame feel this way. But where are these bikes? Do you guys think there is a place for these types of bikes? If I could design bikes, I'd like them to be done in carbon, steel, aluminum, whatever. Would there be companies willing to embark on projects like this? Is there money to be had, as in a concept bike could bring publicity to a brand, as many concept cars do? Or is the performance-oriented cyclist too busy with intervals and powdered drink mix to care?

    Tell me, as I really feel strongly about my designs and would like to share them in three-dimensions.
  2.  
    Shoot us some pix's please, I'd like to take a look at your work!
    • CommentAuthorMaxThrash
    • CommentTimeJun 28th 2009
     
    I think the problem is that the style of bicycles offered by major companies are really determined by whats being used professionally, and the UCI has really clamped down on unique bicycle designs.
    • CommentAuthorOtto Rax
    • CommentTimeJun 28th 2009
     
    There is a whole sector of cycling devoted to that. Most of them at this time looks like choppers. Bike design is kind of limited because of use. To make it utility, it needs one design, to make it fast needs another. For people to want impractical flashy bikes, there needs to be a few things. A) a forum or show where people could show it off. Not alot of that now, and it doesn't seem worth it. You hold a custom car show at steak 'n shake, you get a hundred cars a thousand people. you hold a bike show, and you get 10 dudes and a few girlfriends. The classic bike scene is alot of old schoolers on lightweights. B) cyclists don't have alot of money. if we did, we'd have motorcycles and cars. C) check out old choppers and stingrays, there are guys hydroforming frames for that old school look. There is a small market for it, you just need to look.

    LETS SEE WHAT YOU GOT!

    disclaimer: these are all personal opinions. don't attack me or my thoughts on it. I think more custom bikes would be cool as crap, because even velospace porn is getting monotonous.
  3.  
    Posted By: MaxThrashI think the problem is that the style of bicycles offered by major companies are really determined by whats being used professionally, and the UCI has really clamped down on unique bicycle designs.


    That was one of the aspect that I felt would hamper creativity as far as production and race bikes go, as production bikes mirror race bikes, but it seems to me that a show bike could be the center piece at an INterbike booth, with the other bike around it. It would simply be a design exercise.



    Posted By: stinky peteShoot us some pix's please, I'd like to take a look at your work!

    I have a few BikeCAD files that are kind of half-done, and I'll scan the drawings later....they aren't all finished, oh well. I'm limited by what I can do in BikeCAD, and most of these could be cleaned up and adjusted in Photoshop or MS Paint, and the frames I have drawn are much different in the sense that I can do whatever I want and I'm not limited to a somewhat basic tubeset. There are also other drawings which are based on even wilder bikes, and I have included a few pictures of bikes that have inspired me.

    I'll have more later, the drawings better convey the shape I look for.
  4.  
    "Nebacanezzar"




    Warp 9


    DemonShredder


    Montreal ITTSE


    Montreal


    Courcheval



    Please note that I consider these all unfinished!













    • CommentAuthorLyKqiD
    • CommentTimeJun 28th 2009 edited
     
    You need a program like Maya, Rhinoceros3D, Solid Works, or Autodesk Alias...
    These allow you to entirely 3D render your product.

    Solid Works allows adds physics to an animation, ex. if you build the crank and chain correctly in Solid Works, when the cranks spins so will the chain.

    Profile shots dont show any depth, as much as they may show off the geometry. All the tubes are 2D and have no volume to them in BikeCAD.

    BikeCAD is great for getting an idea, but if you truly want to explore those designs, you need a 3D rendering program.

    Like you said, at the end of the day, the program is really just holding your designs back.
    • CommentAuthorsimonweiss
    • CommentTimeJun 28th 2009
     
    Not to be rude but, your designs besides the Montreal bike are not innovative at all. Just color variations of newer looking road bike frames. The photos you posted on the other hand are awesome.
  5.  
    keep in mind simon w. that he dosent have a prof. program and most of his bikes have tubing like aluminum and steel, where as the real bikes for the most part were carbon fiber and have much more flow compared to metal tubed frames.
  6.  
    Posted By: simonweissNot to be rude but, your designs besides the Montreal bike are not innovative at all. Just color variations of newer looking road bike frames. The photos you posted on the other hand are awesome.


    Posted By: simonweissNot to be rude but, your designs besides the Montreal bike are not innovative at all. Just color variations of newer looking road bike frames. The photos you posted on the other hand are awesome.


    Posted By: you dont know mekeep in mind simon w. that he dosent have a prof. program and most of his bikes have tubing like aluminum and steel, where as the real bikes for the most part were carbon fiber and have much more flow compared to metal tubed frames.




    Yes, I realize that the bikes are basic, as I don't have the money or skill for professional programs. simonweiss, if you had read what I said above, then you would know that there are limitations to what I can do with the means avaliable to me, and the pictures above are a vague representation of what I fin appealing. When I get acess to a scanner I would love to share my pencil-and-paper drawings which are decidedly basic, but more indicative of what I see in my head, it's the best outlet for me. This thread was also meant to be a discussion on the thoughts of a concept type bike. I have seen the chopper/scraper bikes, but I mean bikes aimed at a different market niche. Also, the bikes I have posted above are not just "repaints" of pro bikes. The geometry is much different than a true bike, the seats are over the rear axle, and the tube lengths and offsets are very impractical. I'm not saying you have to find them attractive, it's just that I am curious to know if this is something that other people think about or not, and if the industry would embrace concepts like these.
  7.  
    i do like these designs, alot of them have promising ideas.
 
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