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  1.  
    Alright, I don't know about everyone else on here, but i'm getting tired of the same old threads over and over again, and I thought this would be a topic a lot of folks could contribute on.
    So lets get this thing started, what has the greatest challenge been for you with living via bicycle? what are your favorite moments? how do you haul your groceries, supplies, whatever you need to get from point a to point b?
    I've been curious lately about how other people handle the day to day on a bicycle. I myself love having racks, panniers, and a handlebar bag, the handlebar bag never leaves my bike, so that handle most of the day to day, with the panniers coming out whenever I need to haul some shit. But I know a lot of people are happy with just a messenger bag, or backpack. what sort of gear do you find vital? I find generator lights to be essential, only because they never need to be removed, or stop working, which is great when you find yourself out after dark. Full coverage fenders are great out here in the rainy PNW, but obviously not needed where it hardly rains. what sort of tool kit do you guys ride with? Lately i've been working on sliming mine down, to just a spare tube, patch kit, tire levers, security key for my front wheel, some tire boots, and a few bungie cords. For those with longer commutes, do you mix public transit into the mix?
    Alright, I think thats enough to start with, Velospace! what say you?
  2.  
    Well.... I still drive a car but I commute over 7000kms a year on my bike. That should keep me out of hell I think.
    • CommentAuthorper.k
    • CommentTimeOct 23rd 2012 edited
     
    On the 1st really rainy day I found out somehow I have lost one of the zippers on my shoe cover. I almost went to look at new ones, but honestly my feet get wet either way so I may just wear it as is with the velcro around my ankle doing all the work and my heel exposed slightly...

    I have considered being classy and getting panniers, racks, and full fenders. But I just haven't....and I have some nice big bags(one backpack, one messenger) for my grocery/hauling needs. I usually can ride anywhere I need, but I occasionally use the light rail since it is fast, reasonably cheap, and reliable(unlike the metros here in Seattle).

    I finally put a flat kit together, just patch kit, levers, tube, and co2 carts. It's not really hard to live by bike, at least not most of the time as long as I don't allow myself to be a baby about it. I would like to live in a flatter warmer city, but I would really like to live in Holland where I would sacrifice warmth for quality of life/biking ;)
  3.  
    Oh and hard to double my kids with their hockey gear to games on my bike.
  4.  
    I currently don't commute only by car (I'm getting back to it though and putting my car up for sale within the month), but until this past year, I commuted by bike only since 2008. I loved it. It slowed life down a bit and made me appreciate things a little more. It made me more efficient. I think the hardest thing at first was the winter commuting and rain. But I soon learned that there is no such thing as bad weather, only bad clothing and preparation. I can't wait to get rid of my car and just get back to a comfortable, slow paced life (something very hard to come by in todays world).
  5.  
    I don't have a car. I have the usual panniers etc, but I also picked up one of those tow-behind baby carts. I couldn't live without it, especially for doing laundry and hauling really big stuff.
    • CommentAuthorZovelo
    • CommentTimeOct 23rd 2012
     
    Yes! I got a Burley trailer a couple of months back when Mrs Zovelo went back to university, leaving me to do the school run in the mornings. Kids love riding in the trailer and it's going to be the best winter training for me, hauling the two of them up the hill from our house every day.
    Still own a car, but car-free for the commute and school run, so greener than most folks!
    • CommentAuthorveggie
    • CommentTimeOct 23rd 2012
     
    Its kinda not hard to have a car in houston(at least for me), everything is so spread out and I dont pay for my own gas(that will change Nov 1)

    I also plan on buying a small trailer for grocery runs when i move out in the next month or so
  6.  
    I never did the whole trailer thing. I liked just having my track bike and a bag. Grocery runs were done with a my 60L hiking pack and same with laundry. It kept thing minimal for me. I don't have kids or anything, so I'm sure it's much easier for me than you folks with families.
    • CommentAuthorveggie
    • CommentTimeOct 23rd 2012
     
    its cheaper for me and i feel a trailler will be easier for me.
    • CommentAuthorosopardo
    • CommentTimeOct 23rd 2012
     
    My commute is 13 miles to work and 13 back. Riding in Dallas is not too bad. People hate that cyclists have to share the road, but that's is anywhere in the US, I imagine. Crossing the Trinity River bridges is the only hassle, reason being the speed limit is 40 mph and drivers, of course, drive 60 MPH. Also the amount of hit-and-runs is insane and rising, but that is anywhere in the US, I imagine. I also start work at 0600, so to leave room for error I leave at 0430. Ride normally takes about 40-45 minutes.
    • CommentAuthorMANNY E
    • CommentTimeOct 23rd 2012
     
    In Chicago it's faster than the bus or "L" train and way cheaper than a car. I ride almost everyday of the year. I get on the bus sometimes in the winter when it's 20 below and windy as shit. I have multiple routes I can take to and from work. It's a nice little 6 mile commute. Never a dull moment in the AM rush. It wakes me up before I get to work. .....And it's a great way to stay in shape.
  7.  
    That seems odd having a name like Veggie in Texas with all the beef...
    • CommentAuthorveggie
    • CommentTimeOct 23rd 2012
     
    There are a lot of nice veggie friendly places in houstin/austin
  8.  
    Posted By: MANNY EIn Chicago it's faster than the bus or "L" train and way cheaper than a car. I ride almost everyday of the year. I get on the bus sometimes in the winter when it's 20 below and windy as shit. I have multiple routes I can take to and from work. It's a nice little 6 mile commute. Never a dull moment in the AM rush. It wakes me up before I get to work. .....And it's a great way to stay in shape.


    the CTA(chicago transit authority) is really inconvenient time to time, but it is faster than driving. and i bike between 5 to 10 miles (back and forth)
    • CommentAuthorcg3288
    • CommentTimeOct 23rd 2012
     
    I bike to work about three times a week. It's a nice 8.5 mile ride each way that is pretty flat. I just ride with a bag because i just haven't got a rack for my peugeot yet. I'm sure i'll enjoy it much more when I dont have a heavy bag on my back. I'd love to ride everyday but with a wife that works nights and a son it's not very logical to be car free. I do bike alot with my boy in the kid trailer. It's fun for me and he loves it too.
    • CommentAuthortypeDvorak
    • CommentTimeOct 23rd 2012
     



    This was a costco run last winter. Haven't done anything quite documentation worthy recently though.
    • CommentAuthorMancha150
    • CommentTimeOct 23rd 2012
     
    You and I both know that bag of dog food ways 50 pounds...

    In any event, that is awesome, I strive to be you.
    • CommentAuthorMancha150
    • CommentTimeOct 23rd 2012
     
    So I had a car when I was in DC, and everyone here knows that if you have a car that runs, and need to go to the supermarket, you look at your bike, then your car, then your bike again. Its a no brainer. That actually happened quite a bit. I would have rather liked to ride my bike literally everywhere (I commuted everyday on bike, but when I went places with the wife it was drive or die). I think I also had this worry all the time that even if I locked my bike up like a pro, something would still happen to it. Since my office building had a garage, one lock and I was worry free.

    Now that I am in Mexico and have no car, its 1000000% more frustrating because on the one hand, traffic probably travels at a speed of 10km per hour average for 20 hours of the day, it is an absolute nightmare straight out of hell to go anywhere in bus or taxi. The only thing that resembles even the slightest bit of order here is the metro, which is absolutely amazing and probably the greatest transportation investment this or any major city has ever made. On the other hand, you end up walking much further distances than is optimal when you need to be somewhere. So when I am not on my bike, I am miserable. Two days a week I work on the "outskirts of the city" (up a "mountain") -as if the city ever ends whichever direction you go -, and my commute on bike is 45 mins each way (its brutal on the way there, but it feels so good when I make it to the top with my absurd gearing). Compare this to 2 hours each way on metro and bus. Thats 4 hours of the day I could be doing something better. So unless I am functioning on 2 hours of sleep, I force myself to ride to work no matter what happens. I think I finally found a commute that would be impossible on a single speed fixed gear bike unless you had a 39X26 gearing.

    As for getting around town, as much as I would love to ride everywhere, my wife isnt a big fan of just strolling on her bike in this city (I dont blame her), and on top of that unless I protect my bike with a shield, leaving it locked up somewhere for more than a few mins is bound to get massive attention. And people around here always have a few allen keys and wrenches in their pockets. So while I work from home and get distracted from what I am doing, I look over my shoulder at my bike and dream of the day that I will be like TypeDvorak...

    As for packing things up, I have been meaning to get a rack but never used one, so its been backpack heaven for me. I actually commute with a laptop, which is the stupiest thing you could ever do for many reasons. Whatever this thing weighs it feels like that bag of adult husky dog food after 10 mins uphill. My wife swears by her front rack, and would throw her huge bag in it all the time and say it felt like it wasnt there. Maybe I should get something at some point too.
    • CommentAuthorlatron
    • CommentTimeOct 23rd 2012 edited
     


    Got my license at 16; by age 29 I was commuting 90 minutes each way by car to work. Did it for a year and said the hell with it. Got a new job five blocks from where I lived, sold my car, and that was that. Since then -- a good fifteen years now -- haven't had or wanted a car. Just don't give yourself any choice: You'll be amazed at how resourceful you can be. It also helps that bikes are just so damn capable. Above I'm getting some party supplies for about 30 people (food, drinks, etc.); I could have doubled my load with panniers and not even noticed. Have gotten lumber, crates of books, all kinds of crazy stuff without problems. Other piece of advice: Don't depend on good weather, just ride. It's best to look, suit up, and get out the door.

    I now live about a half mile from work (different home, different job), but it's actually too close, so I do a five-mile loop every morning just to get some exercise. It's fun every day -- always something to look at, particularly drivers stuck in endless traffic jams. "Get a bike!" I call out nicely to the ones who seem potentially receptive. Who knows; maybe one of them will someday -- I did.
  9.  
    Posted By: typeDvorak


    This was a costco run last winter. Haven't done anything quite documentation worthy recently though.

    is that a real extrecycle or the trek one-off?

    I like this thread
    • CommentAuthorstalag13
    • CommentTimeOct 23rd 2012
     
    That Costco run looks epic.

    I've lived car free for most of the last dozen years. My commute has been as long as 26 miles roundtrip (living in the city, working the 'burbs) to my super sweet 3 mile roundtrip commute currently. My life can be limited on a spur of the moment basis. I've found awesome furniture at flea markets and garage sales that I've either had to pass on or go through a tremendous ordeal to get home. But otherwise, I can do most everything I need to by bike, from getting the groceries to commuting to carrying a whole 'nother bicycle broken down and strapped to my backpack to the lbs. When I do need a car, I just book a ZipCar, which I just did over the weekend to buy a bed from IKEA. I've got a mess bag for day to day work, and a backpack for groceries/errands/beaches/BBQ's/etc. Between that and ZipCar, I just don't see the need to acquire a car anytime in the near future.

    I've boiled down everything I need on a day-to-day basis to be able to fit into my Chrome Hipbone. It's nice not having to have a bag on your back when riding.

    If you don't have kids, living a car-free life can be incredibly simple, much more simple than people realize. But like everything, it's always that initial leap that's hard to make. That jump from being moribund and physically unable to climb even a small hill to being able to bike to work have it seem natural seems like a modest thing, but I get the feeling that people build it up in their heads that it's like an insurmountable obstacle. I'm trying to get a friend over that hurdle right now.
    • CommentAuthorlatron
    • CommentTimeOct 23rd 2012
     
    Just talked my co-worker into making the switch -- and he has kids. "That was the best decision I ever made," he said of starting to commute by bike.
    • CommentAuthorveggie
    • CommentTimeOct 23rd 2012
     
    I'm going to attempt to use my car as little as possible, but I don't see myself going 100% car free anytime soon.
    • CommentAuthortypeDvorak
    • CommentTimeOct 24th 2012 edited
     
    Coming from the suburbs of LA and then the West Side of LA a car felt like a necessity. I've since been able to localize almost my complete commutes to about 15min in shit weather and much less during the rest of the year. I wish my apartment didn't suck so bad because the location is unbeatable. I've got two big parks and a museum's sculpture park within a half mile for the dog to run around in, downhill from the bars, costco, el job, studio, and school, ordered that way in total distance from front door. Everything is awesome, almost.
    • CommentAuthorlatron
    • CommentTimeOct 24th 2012
     
    Posted By: veggieI'm going to attempt to use my car as little as possible, but I don't see myself going 100% car free anytime soon.

    Even using your car less is a great thing to do. Set a goal: Cut the miles you drive by 25% or whatever. Explore ways to do things you thought you "had" to have a car to do. And one day you might find yourself saying, "Hey, I haven't driven that thing in a month...."
  10.  
    About 4 years ago, I traded my Toyota Sienna to a tattoo artist with a young family. I hadn't driven it for about a year prior, and it was a beautiful family van that ran great. I decided to ditch the autos and go full-on bike. Is it hard sometimes? Yep. As someone said previously, sometimes I'm a baby about it. Sometimes I get cranky if I have to ride a vintage Cinelli home in the rain, or get caught somewhere stupid like Walmart. I live in SW Florida, and the rain and thunder storms here can be extreme. I don't mind so much riding in it as I do people can't see me AT ALL. My ride to work is 14 miles one way, which is not a big deal, but it has stopped me from seeking a promotion because they can randomly reassign managers to any store in a 90 mile radius. I really don't want a 4 hour commute just to open a pharmacy at 7am, if you know what I mean. My fiancée has a car, which she needs for her job with the city at a science center and museum. Sometimes, she surprises me at work when it's crappy weather with a ride home (which is appreciated!) Switching to bike only was hard at first, but I got better and faster as time went on. I went from being vegetarian to full vegan about the same time I ditched my car. I sometimes envy the spontaneity that comes with car ownership (such as spur of the moment road trips) but I also appreciate the ability to be completely self-contained and self-sufficient on my bike. The bike has forced me to slow down and to explore my home town, which has led to a lot of discoveries most people who live here never get to find.
  11.  
    i follow this thread with mixed feelings. i'm glad to see so many success stories, but for me the bloom is coming off the rose a bit -- after eight years of riding to work year-round, along with as many errands as i can manage, i am losing some of my enthusiasm for it. part of it is the intensifying "verkehrkampf" in our city, especially on the south side within a few miles of the office, where cars and trucks are more plentiful than ever, and seemingly angrier by the day. interesting puzzles like "how can i keep my feet warm" and "where can i fit items a, b and c" have been replaced with "am i going to be run over today". for all our fair city has done to promote bicycling within the city limits in recent years, the south state street corridor is positively dismal. for the last month i have been taking an alternate route home, which adds about 2 miles (by way of a dirt road with an alpaca farm); it's better in spots, but there are still risks. bruised ribs from my last spill are just about okay after two months -- i'm no longer afraid of sneezing. but i am not riding as often as i used to. maybe i will pick things up again this winter. but it is a little ironic to see this uptick in everyday bicycling at the same time i have gotten worn down by the relentless imposition, via heedless motorists, of unnecessary risk.

    i won't even start on "car free".
    • CommentAuthorMancha150
    • CommentTimeOct 24th 2012
     
    Posted By: cicadashelli follow this thread with mixed feelings. i'm glad to see so many success stories, but for me the bloom is coming off the rose a bit -- after eight years of riding to work year-round, along with as many errands as i can manage, i am losing some of my enthusiasm for it. part of it is the intensifying "verkehrkampf" in our city, especially on the south side within a few miles of the office, where cars and trucks are more plentiful than ever, and seemingly angrier by the day. interesting puzzles like "how can i keep my feet warm" and "where can i fit items a, b and c" have been replaced with "am i going to be run over today". for all our fair city has done to promote bicycling within the city limits in recent years, the south state street corridor is positively dismal. for the last month i have been taking an alternate route home, which adds about 2 miles (by way of a dirt road with an alpaca farm); it's better in spots, but there are still risks. bruised ribs from my last spill are just about okay after two months -- i'm no longer afraid of sneezing. but i am not riding as often as i used to. maybe i will pick things up again this winter. but it is a little ironic to see this uptick in everyday bicycling at the same time i have gotten worn down by the relentless imposition, via heedless motorists, of unnecessary risk.

    i won't even start on "car free".


    Nice ending to a good argument.
  12.  
    i ride my bike to the nasa jsc...and take a rocket under my crotch back home err' day. wish i had a car instead. imma bitch and im riding a bike home after the shitty 8-5 sucks
  13.  
    Posted By: stevenwilliamsenAbout 4 years ago, I traded my Toyota Sienna to a tattoo artist with a young family. I hadn't driven it for about a year prior, and it was a beautiful family van that ran great. I decided to ditch the autos and go full-on bike. Is it hard sometimes? Yep. As someone said previously, sometimes I'm a baby about it. Sometimes I get cranky if I have to ride a vintage Cinelli home in the rain, or get caught somewhere stupid like Walmart. I live in SW Florida, and the rain and thunder storms here can be extreme. I don't mind so much riding in it as I do people can't see me AT ALL. My ride to work is 14 miles one way, which is not a big deal, but it has stopped me from seeking a promotion because they can randomly reassign managers to any store in a 90 mile radius. I really don't want a 4 hour commute just to open a pharmacy at 7am, if you know what I mean. My fiancée has a car, which she needs for her job with the city at a science center and museum. Sometimes, she surprises me at work when it's crappy weather with a ride home (which is appreciated!) Switching to bike only was hard at first, but I got better and faster as time went on. I went from being vegetarian to full vegan about the same time I ditched my car. I sometimes envy the spontaneity that comes with car ownership (such as spur of the moment road trips) but I also appreciate the ability to be completely self-contained and self-sufficient on my bike. The bike has forced me to slow down and to explore my home town, which has led to a lot of discoveries most people who live here never get to find.

    I still want a picture of my bike on your back like an italian banjo!
    • CommentAuthorper.k
    • CommentTimeOct 24th 2012
     
    Sorry to hear about your struggles cicada. I will admit, at the beginning of everyday I have to cross a 6 way uncontrolled intersection that really irks me due to drivers losing all their logic and just randomly embarking across regardless of if I am crossing. I've adopted a game playing mentality to it after these 5 years, but after you take a shot like you did I'm sure it's harder to make it seem so light-hearted.

    My closest was the time I almost got t-boned by a Chevy SSR burning out and hockey slid so hard I warped my rear rim ;p
  14.  
    Hey, like i thought, everyone seems to have some great stuff to say on the topic, it is quite interesting to see how everyone else tackles their commutes, it is sad how great commuting can be in some places and well, terrifying in others, cicadashell's contribution is something i was hoping to hear when i started this thread, as i know all of us have had at one point or other had to deal with cars in a less than wonderful manner. I myself have been in a number of accidents, all when i was back in south Florida, where the SUV rules the world with a senior citizen who shouldn't be on the road around every bend. I think we all need to remember how bad commuting can be, especially if you are blessed with living someplace where it actually can be pretty great. When i moved out to Seattle Washington from Sarasota Florida, I couldn't believe how big of a difference it was. Courteous drivers, plentiful trails, bike lanes, little bike guys painted on the road to remind motorist cyclist are sharing the road, it was as if everyone took their heads out of their ass.

    I'd like to add, that i didn't mean to exclude those who also use an automobile from this discussion, as i understand it is exceptionally hard for one with a family, even if you are willing, to get all your ducks onboard with something, that is, well, not the way things are generally done (although, its pretty rad when you see that happen) In my own life, I commute by bike all the time, my girlfriend, will not ride hers, and i get it, it can be scary for sure, so she takes advantage of public transit, and we are car free, so it works. I know she dreads the bus service late at night, but what can you do?

    I'd say so far typeDvorak has the most win with his costco run, which makes me want to see more photos of the like, i'll have to snap one next time i hit up the store, but for everyone else, lets see how awesome you are at doing your thing! more pictures of bikes at work are necessary.

    heres a fun little story from my first winter out here in seattle, we had our first bout of real seattle snow, and i was ready to see what all the fuss was about, how the city shuts down, and no one knows what to do etc. It also happened to be grocery store day, and i figured it was a great time to see what all this fuss was about, with this Snow and all. not having any sort of studded, spiked tire, or chains for that matter, i set out, hoping a fixed gear drivetrain would be enough to keep me upright. Oh, did i mention i had little to no appropriate gear for the weather? i had a decent coat, but only little fingerless gloves, sneakers, and little shoe covers that fit over the toe of the shoe only. a mile into the route to the store, i'd fallen over twice already, my face, hands, and feet were more or less frozen, and i had to get off and walk a few times because the snow was so deep, And every so often i had to scrap snow from my front fender, as it was collecting into a great chunk and seizing up my front wheel. Eventually i made it to the store, and realized i'd lost both my shoe covers along the way, so i go on in, and shop and fill up all my panniers, and head back to my snow covered bike, where, i loaded up and set out with a lot more weight to get me down the hill. once i was on my way i happily passed stalled out cars, in between 2-4 more spills as i hit portions of ice. long story short i made it back alive, with food, and proud that i was able to do it. From that experience i learned a few things, next time it snows i'm going to prepare a little more,look into some tire chains, and maybe pull off the fenders so i don't have to keep clearing them of snow, and definitely think about stocking up before it starts snowing...
    • CommentAuthorveggie
    • CommentTimeOct 24th 2012
     
    Thankfully here I won't ever have to deal with snow or even extreme cold, slightly above freezing is usually the worst it gets here. Though it does get really hot here.
    • CommentAuthorlatron
    • CommentTimeOct 25th 2012 edited
     


    The appropriate gear counts, both for bike and rider, and can transform a nightmare trip into the best ride of your life.

    Above is Cambridge, Mass., in the winter of 2011. Snow emergency, with one huge storm passed and another on its way. On certain major streets that are normally parking lots filled with angry drivers at rush hour, there was nothing but silence, bliss, and me. All it took was some good clothes (especially the gloves) and a bike with low gearing, full fenders, and studded tires (from Finland, of course). Not one spill and a hell of a lot of fun.
    • CommentAuthorlatron
    • CommentTimeOct 25th 2012
     
    Posted By: williamblakeetcI'd say so far typeDvorak has the most win with his costco run, which makes me want to see more photos of the like

    There's a cooperative house nearby that does all its shopping by bike. They built their own super-long trailer and haul ten grocery bags back every time easy. Also spotted a homebrew rear-steer cargo bike; will see if I can get a shot of it loaded up.
  15.  
    Great thread. Reading everybody's harrowing tales makes me glad I live in Portland! Worst we usually get is a little (okay, a lot) of rain, and most of my commute is designated bike routes. The only hairy part is downtown, but that's sort of fun once you get used to it.

    I pass quite a few people with sweet cargo bikes, and maybe I'll get one someday, but for now all I have is my trusty Seal Line urban pack. It's served me well and is highly recommended.
    • CommentAuthorjburnha
    • CommentTimeNov 10th 2012
     
    Hey Guys, I agree nice thread here.
    I lived in Chicago for 8 years without a car. Certainly the public transportation and availability of things like local bodegas and craigslist (for furniture, etc) made things a bit easier. By the end of my time in Chicago, I was so comfortable getting around that city and could do so faster than most cars, but I never got to the point of "Ugh I have to get ready..." and there was rarely a problem due to my carless-ness. I was a year-round commuter there and there was nothing like it, esp on those days like Latron mentions where cars are buried and there is an eerie winter silence as you slowly make your way through the snow-filled roads. ...In full honesty, I would get disparaged as spring warmed and slowly hundreds and then thousands of other cyclists appeared on the roads -- but that is a good thing really I guess. Honestly, gear is the only thing that made this winter-commuting possible: proper ski/ice-climbing outerwear, reliable low-gearable tready bike; and rain is the same way: waterpoof this and that, plus lots of grease for the bike and fenders! How/Why do more people not use full fenders?
    In Bergen, where I have lived a little over a year now, it rains about twice a day and the winter isn't too bad with some snow. Same argument as above though there is less effective public transportation making some tasks more difficult.
    I don't have kids / I live in the city / I am still within walking distance of any type of store, be it hardware or electronics, and so I just don't need a car,-but that is today! I am hoping in the next year to move to a small island (yes I have one in mind) where a car/truck will be most likely required for transporting goods from off-island to on without being too much of a pain. For example: today firewood is delivered because there is no way I could go and pick up a chord of wood on my touring bike -- at least I am not going to try (looks like TypeDvorak could manage! Awesome by the way).
    On a final note, though not to be a contrarian: After a long day there is nothing I want more than to get on my bike and ride home, even in the rain, and there is no dread association with that trip. There is something that feels so good about getting the blood flowing, feeling the wind push or pull at you, and that little bit of joy whenever you reach the top of a hill and for at least a moment you can coast. I would go mad and probably could not sustain a relationship for very long if I had to get in a car after work and deal with city traffic, city parking and those damn cyclists that are on the road at night!
    Ride safe!
    • CommentAuthoriancambio
    • CommentTimeNov 10th 2012 edited
     
    ive lived my whole adult life car free. I bought my first nice bike when i was 18 and i honestly cant be bothered to buy a car. I have always tried to live close to work and ive made choices about what part of the city to live in (always downtown) that allow me to live a car free lifestyle. I can count on one hand the instances in the past year where ive needed a car. Moving was a big one, and going to ikea to buy furniture being the other time i needed one. In both cases i borrowed a friends car so its not like its an issue anyways. I think people rely on cars way too much. I enjoy walking just as much as i enjoy cycling so i tend to walk quite a bit in the winter. it gives me time to think about what i have to do at my stressful job for the day. I think i own 5 bikes right now and i dont intend on giving up this aspect of my life any time soon! winter riding is so much fun too. I have messenger bags of various sizes so thats how i get groceries and haul my crap. i shop for food in a very european style, so i just buy what i need for every meal. it minimizes the amount of things you have to carry from the store. i live 6 blocks from two grocery stores and there is a really great little store 5 houses away from me.
  16.  
    Alright, i took the time after my grocery run to snap a couple pics, not an excessive load today, but pretty average for me. this is what $135 dollars in groceries looks like carried on a bike, and unloaded.











    • CommentAuthorMancha150
    • CommentTimeNov 12th 2012
     
    How did I not see that bike before it is glorious!
    • CommentAuthortypeDvorak
    • CommentTimeNov 12th 2012
     
    Haha, RAD!
  17.  
    I like to think at least i'm getting at least a little use out of the double top tubes.
    • CommentAuthortypeDvorak
    • CommentTimeNov 19th 2012
     
    ^How come you have the labels covered up? I saw the same thing when I went to Chicago on a lot of bikes on a lot of budget ranges. Is it anti-theft? I had never seen it while I was living in Los Angeles. Nobody here in KC, where I am now, does this. Splain?
    • CommentAuthorFeFst
    • CommentTimeNov 19th 2012
     
    I am only 22yrs old, never had a Car, and don't see my self having one anytime soon. I have a few bikes, (Track, Fixed, MTN, 2 Road.) I live my life on my bike. I have worked Courier/Bike shop tech.. I can get anything and almost everything on my bike.
    I have a bob trailer, Cetma 7rail front rack, Sag bag, Baily works large, Jans sport, Green Guru backpack messenger bag, a few hip bags. I have everything I need depending on the situation.
    I have full fenders if time calls, SPDs. Different tires for different situations.I love my bikes and I love being Car free!
  18.  
    Posted By: typeDvorak^How come you have the labels covered up? I saw the same thing when I went to Chicago on a lot of bikes on a lot of budget ranges. Is it anti-theft? I had never seen it while I was living in Los Angeles. Nobody here in KC, where I am now, does this. Splain?


    I just never liked the font used/style of the mercier logo. I suppose it does have an anti theft bonus in that it makes it more recognizable, but i'd wager thats a marginal effect.
  19.  
    So I just picked up a four footer for my studio apartment, I realized as I was loading it I probably could of gone a bit larger, trees are surprisingly light...







    who really needs a cargo bike, right?
    • CommentAuthorveggie
    • CommentTimeNov 30th 2012
     
    I still wouldn't turn down an extracycle :D
  20.  
    What shoe are you wearing, billy blake?
  21.  
    Some type of vintage or vintage "look" Sidi's.
 



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