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  1.  
    I was wondering if there is anybody out here on Velospace who has experience with building, authorizing and or funding of a Velodrome. I know of local skateparks that have been build in the area and am sure that there is a way. I am currently working on a proposal to bring forward to a few corporations and landowners/city officials/representatives in the area.
    • CommentAuthorAaron C
    • CommentTimeOct 30th 2008
     
    good luck. i live in st pual and there was a push to get a velodrome for a long time finally we got one but now about 15 years later it needs to be replaced. they are extremely expensive and hard to get state funding for...
    • CommentAuthorGone
    • CommentTimeOct 30th 2008
     
    We had 3 velodromes in Montreal in a span of 40 years including the fastest indoor UCI track in the world, government officials don't like those things, too expensive to maintain and not profitable. If you have a solid federation and a promoter who can organize six days /keirin races it might work but again in North America we are not cycling oriented compare to the Europeans or Japanese. Vegas might be the place where a fast indoor velodrome would be profitable on Keirin races. It all comes down to money.
  2.  
    I was thinking about outside cement style 333m around, volunteers, private funding... you know-the works
    • CommentAuthorAaron C
    • CommentTimeOct 31st 2008 edited
     
    i hope it works out well. i'm not really sure what they were thinking when ours was built. we can proudly boast like on of only three outdoor wood tracks in the country but who the fuck cares. minnesota is not the place to put things that are supposed to last outside. not to mention the season is only a few months long because of weather restrictions. i am already so busy with work and grad school i hardly ever get out but it would definitely help my cause if i could ride during the winter.
    just out of curiosity what are the banking restrictions on a concrete track. the Blaine, MN track, which is wood, is 43degrees in the corner but i have also ridden kenosha WI, which is concrete and its much shallower. is there a maximum banking you can get with a concrete track.
  3.  
    I think banking depends on individual building aspects some smaller dromes got higher banking than larger ones but if you compare em there is no rule to it san diego 333.33m around 27degrees, st louis 323m around 28degrees, edward rudolph in IL 382m 17.5degrees, baton rouge 333.33m 33degrees and so on. I think indoor velodromes are often steeper (43degrees sounds nice).
    • CommentAuthorGone
    • CommentTimeOct 31st 2008
     
    I know the now defunct Montreal Olympic velodrome was 250m wooden track 45 and 48 degrees banking. Manchester UK wooden track is 43/45 at the ends.
    • CommentAuthorAaron C
    • CommentTimeOct 31st 2008
     
    yea. MN is a 250m
    • CommentAuthorJ Juicy
    • CommentTimeOct 31st 2008 edited
     
    Well, if we would have one it the Bay, it would probably be in SF cause it's a major city. However, Piedmont and like Orinda I think are loaded! My mom tripped on a sidewalk in Piedmont and asked for some money and got like $3G I think. Something like that... It would be nice to have one in Oakland, but I doubt the city council would go for that. Alameda is pretty small I think, right? And I doubt the CA government would give us one in the Bay. =(
    • CommentAuthorGone
    • CommentTimeOct 31st 2008
     
    I think if you want to ride on a wooden indoor track in your state you'll have to go to Carson City. Apparently that track is quite fast.
  4.  
    it's not about what the fucking government would let us have or not here are the facts: Alameda Skate Park was build in 12 days with the help of tons of local volunteers and all for $50K which was majorly donated by locals. the government ain't got shit to do with it. the City of Alameda has to authorize it.
    • CommentAuthorAaron C
    • CommentTimeNov 2nd 2008
     
    nice, diy
  5.  
    Here is the basic history

    There are currently 21 velodromes in the United States. During the end of the 19th century there were more than 200. Between 1898 and 1910, the United States was the dominant world power in bicycle racing. Santa Clara County has had at least one velodrome in operation continuously since 1892, virtually the beginning of velodrome bicycle racing.

    The velodrome at Hellyer Park, aka “the Track,” was first built in 1963 on undesignated county land along Coyote Creek. Hellyer Park was opened in 1965, encompassing the velodrome.

    At first, the velodrome was a banked asphalt oval and little else. Because the velodrome at that time was located far out in the country, little consideration was given any need to prevent unauthorized or unsupervised use; the track was always open to all comers.

    The 1960’s and 70’s saw a large expansion of San Jose, bringing residential population to the park borders. The father of the park project, late county engineer and racing fan Ed Stefani, saw an increased need for security in 1977 when the velodrome was rebuilt with concrete in its present form. It was around this time that the velodrome got its first fence.

    From its inception, the velodrome was operated by volunteers, typically riders. In the early days there was very little organization; the track was just a venue for occasional races and training.

    Velodrome racing at a regular and intensive level began in the 1980’s under the organization of Ed’s friend, the late Don Peterson. Interest in velodrome riding and racing increased dramatically because of these races and Ed asked a number of his associates to incorporate a velodrome association to provide some organization to the track’s operations. That first association was the Hellyer park Velodrome Association, HPVA. It was the HPVA that began to provide supervised introduction sessions for riders new to the track.

    In order to make it easier to raise donated money for various projects, the current NCVA was incorporated in 1993 as a California public-benefit non-profit corporation. NCVA enjoys a tax-free status under IRS 501c(3). NCVA is composed entirely of volunteers and is the de-facto risk management agent for the county in velodrome operations. NCVA exists only to operate the county’s velodrome and for no other reason.
 
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