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    • CommentAuthordl33d
    • CommentTimeFeb 2nd 2009
     
    Greets,

    I bought a nice Brooks saddle for my wife, and she really digs it. And I don't want to buy another one so I've been thinking about ways to make it tougher for the opportunists out there to steal. Here are the ideas that I've heard -:

    1- The old chain trick.
    2- The old chain trick stuffed into a tube trick
    3- The set-the-seat-height then epoxy a 1/4 ball into the allen bolt trick

    Anything else? What sucks the least?

    D
    • CommentAuthorbionnaki
    • CommentTimeFeb 3rd 2009 edited
     
    superglue + bb in both seatpost clamp bolt(s) and seatpost collar bolt.
    and put a black liquor store bag over your saddle when locking up
    (keep the bag under the rails while riding)

    a chain can easily be broken with a chain tool in under 10 seconds and is ugly as sin.
    • CommentAuthorwowzah
    • CommentTimeFeb 3rd 2009 edited
     
    this is may not be what you want to hear

    but don't lock up your bike with a brooks saddle unless you are prepared to pay the money for a new one when it is stolen

    what sucks the least is the standard light wire cable that can connect to your u-lock, made for locking up a saddle
    they would just need a tool to cut through the wire, but it's light and you don't have to deal with super glue in your nice bike parts or a clanky chain

    the black liquor store bag suggestion is probably a good one, but we all know you just want people to admire the brooks when it's locked up
    super glue would probably work best, but i would never want to deal with the hassle, i'd rather just buy a new bike part
    • CommentAuthorgreg
    • CommentTimeFeb 3rd 2009
     
    The chain in a tube trick works great. The chain will get rusty over time and a chain tool won't be able to do anything with it because its basically welded closed. See e.g.:

    • CommentAuthorfixedpuch
    • CommentTimeFeb 3rd 2009
     
    but who wants a rusted chain on their bike? lets try n be a little classy here guys.....
    • CommentAuthorbionnaki
    • CommentTimeFeb 3rd 2009 edited
     
    anyone with a hex key and chaintool can steal that saddle in under 30 seconds.

    and superglue is a hassle, but it is easily dissolved in about 20 minutes so it wont ruin your nice parts.
    • CommentAuthorgreg
    • CommentTimeFeb 3rd 2009
     
    Nothing is fool proof.

    Stopping bike theft isn't about absolute "you can't steal thing under any circumstances" security.

    Its about making your bike less appealing to steal by making it more difficult to strip than the bike next to yours.

    A rusty chain tied to the frame and seat is going to be a pain the ass to get off, and it will take longer than 30 seconds to do. Chances are that at the same bike rack someone has a nicer seat on a quick release with nothing holding it down. As a crime of opportunity a bike thief will logically go with the easiest option and bypass the crappy seat locked up with a rusty chain and grab the easy to detach seat
    • CommentAuthorbionnaki
    • CommentTimeFeb 3rd 2009 edited
     
    I can and have broken chains --even rusty ones-- in seconds. it's really not hard.

    the security game is increasing the amount of time for the thief to steal, as well. this is the point of glue/bb's - not that it's fool proof.

    a chain cannot take more than 30 seconds to break if they have a chaintool. superglue + bb will take at least 20 minutes if they have something sharp and acetone...without these, it would take an hour +. and the added bonus is it doesnt look ugly.
  1.  
    What's the process with the superglue?
    • CommentAuthorbionnaki
    • CommentTimeFeb 3rd 2009 edited
     
    well, the most important thing is to be 100% dialed in - make sure the saddle height and fore/oft are where you want them to be.

    - superglue first into bolt head.

    - insert ball bearing - try to find one that is either smaller or larger than the bolt head - if it's too snug in the bolt, it will take forever to come out. test this out before gluing. you want there to be enough room to insert something in between the bolt head ridge and the bb....or be able to pull out the bb with a pair of pliers.

    - firmly hold the ball bearing down for a few minutes.

    - put some superglue over the bb and let dry.

    removal:

    - acetone on a q-tip to remove the top layer of glue

    - use a sharpened spoke or something similar (or if your bb is larger and protrudes, use pliers) to pry out the bearing

    - acetone on a q-tip again to dissolve the glue inside the bolt head and the sharp object to carve the glue out - this step will take the longest - be sure to have plenty of q-tips and patience to get enough glue out to be able to insert a hex wrench. prepare to spend at least 20 mins per bolt.
    • CommentAuthorwowzah
    • CommentTimeFeb 4th 2009
     
    re: the rusted chain, one of those pins will come out in 30 seconds, it's not that hard

    re: the super glue, that is kind of ocd, i mean how much is your time worth?

    if i have to take an hour to change my saddle or modify something, i'd rather just view it as disposable and lose a saddle every 10 years or some time frame thereabout..
    • CommentAuthorbionnaki
    • CommentTimeFeb 4th 2009
     
    that's why you should wait until you're 100% dialed in.
    • CommentAuthorwowzah
    • CommentTimeFeb 4th 2009
     
    i respect your commitment to keeping your saddle it's just not for everyone

    i'd rather use some cheap wire cable on an average saddle that can be cut with a hack saw in 10 seconds

    if someone wants the saddle they will get it

    they can just cut the lock and get your entire bike
    • CommentAuthorbionnaki
    • CommentTimeFeb 4th 2009 edited
     
    yeah, obviously.

    I have my brooks team pro for about 8 years, so it's nice and worn in. it's perfect.

    I really dont want to use another saddle and certainly not a cheap one that's less comfortable.

    When I do long lockup, I also run a cable through the rear tire, frame, saddle rails, and post. Along with the bearings & glue and my u-lock, I have peace of mind. Sure, a professional thief with powertools can steal the entire bike, but the casual thief wont get close.
    • CommentAuthorwowzah
    • CommentTimeFeb 5th 2009
     
    bionnaki,
    as a funny and ridiculous question:

    how long do you think it would take to hacksaw through a seatpost?

    it probably depends on the post, but i imagine many post would take 5-10 minutes
    • CommentAuthorbionnaki
    • CommentTimeFeb 5th 2009 edited
     
    probably.
    but anyone in the know enough to spot a brooks (hidden under my liquor store bag) and want to steal it
    would also notice my seatpost which is probably worth more than my beat-to-hell brooks.

    saddle/seatpost theft is something I dont worry about anymore
    and I live in a major city where bike theft is a major problem.
    • CommentAuthorgreg
    • CommentTimeFeb 5th 2009
     
    Less with a pipe cutter
    • CommentAuthorwowzah
    • CommentTimeFeb 5th 2009 edited
     
    i didn't think of the pipe cutter,

    how long would it take to cut up someones frame with that? and take the whole bike with a jacked up frame?

    i know it's ridiculous, i mean who the hell is going to hacksaw a seatpost, but we are at the point of super gluing bearings
    • CommentAuthorAaron C
    • CommentTimeFeb 5th 2009
     
    if you had a large capacity pipe cutter with good cutting wheels i bet you could cut through a frame in about a minute, two tops. i guess it would fuck the frame but i suppose if you are carting around some expensive components it might be worth it to a thief.
    • CommentAuthorgreg
    • CommentTimeFeb 5th 2009 edited
     
    I'd cut a frame to get some sweet wood-grained aerospokes

 
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