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    • CommentAuthormeatroll
    • CommentTimeMar 9th 2010
     
    So I'm thinking about getting something along the lines of the Leader 725TR, or that whatever they call that one over at bikesdirect.. Anyway what I'm really wondering is if it would be possible (and not extremely difficult/expensive to find someone to do it for me) to add cable guides for a rear brake, as I would like to run dual brakes. I know they make clip on cable guides but that would look pretty fucking awful on one those thick ass TTs. Thanks in advance.
  1.  
    Uhm, you could have it done, but it would not be particularly cheap, and would require, at the very least, some serious touch up painting to make look stock. You could just use clear zip ties and a fully sealed cable... I'm not sure you can get removable guides in that size, but I'm sure someone could make them if they were industrious enough.
  2.  
    I forgot, I saw this on a blog not too long ago, you could always do it yourself..........

    Otherwise I've been trying to think of a similar fixed frame which has routing for a rear brake, but I'm coming up empty. Do you really need a rear?
    • CommentAuthormeatroll
    • CommentTimeMar 9th 2010
     
    I don't even really know why I want a rear, I've been brakeless for most of the time up until now.. I think part of it is that the idea of a dummy lever kind of annoys me, and part of it is that I want both cable grooves on my drops to be filled, not just one. All silly finicky shit, I know.
  3.  
    I don't like single drop/tt levers either, or dummies for that matter, but I'm OK with a single lever in the flat section. But yeah, that's pretty nit-picky for something that is going to cost a bit to get right..
  4.  
    So, you're mainly just putting a brake on for aesthetic reasons? Haha.
  5.  
    They're just cable stops. I'm sure you could epoxy them in place.
    • CommentAuthorquidose
    • CommentTimeMar 10th 2010
     
    This baffles me.

    How about cutting some brake cable housing to the exact length you need to fill in the handlebar groove before you tape it? That would acheive the feel of uniformity that you're after.
    • CommentAuthorRuffinit
    • CommentTimeMar 10th 2010
     
    Posted By: Joshua A.C. NewmanThey're just cable stops. I'm sure you could epoxy them in place.

    How about this: Cannondales older frames have plastic cable guides which use anchors and are attached via two small drilled holes in the aluminum tubing. You could do one of a couple things. You could buy the plastic cable guides (which look quite nice), drill the two small (~1/8") holes per guide and be done with it, OR you could ask one of us C'dale nuts for the old ones that we have laying around because they were knocked off our frames and replaced with new ones. To attach the old ones you could either epoxy as Josh states above and be done with it or use some of the high strength automotive double sided tape to attach them. Either of the last two are non-invasive to the frame and if you wanted at a later time you could just remove them without damage to the frame. Personally I'd go with the double-sided tape.
    • CommentAuthoreaglerock
    • CommentTimeMar 10th 2010 edited
     
    Posted By: RuffinitTo attach the old ones you could either epoxy as Josh states above and be done with it or use some of the high strength automotive double sided tape to attach them. Either of the last two are non-invasive to the frame and if you wanted at a later time you could just remove them without damage to the frame. Personally I'd go with the double-sided tape.

    This is a product I've heard about, but never seen; my local hardware stores don't carry any sturdy double-sided tape at all. I could use some of this to attach detached headtube badges; is there a particular term of art for the product, or a manufacturer/brand people would recommend?
    • CommentAuthorRuffinit
    • CommentTimeMar 10th 2010 edited
     
    Posted By: eaglerock
    This is a product I've heard about, but never seen; my local hardware stores don't carry any sturdy double-sided tape at all. I could use some of this to attach detached headtube badges; is there a particular term of art for the product, or a manufacturer/brand people would recommend?

    3M makes some great stuff. It's used for attaching things like "chrome", trim, air dams, ground effects and fog lamp brackets to cars and comes in different thicknesses and depending on what you get could be white or black. Any autobody shop supplier should have it or many auto parts stores.
    • CommentAuthorjaybird74
    • CommentTimeMar 10th 2010
     
    Regarding the unused cable grooves in bars... Deda Elementi makes something called the "Groove Strip". Its sole purpose is to fill in the unused cable grooves in bars.
  6.  
    Yeah, the dark grey stuff, not the clear stuff. Still, I'd go with epoxy. It's permanent, but it doesn't pop apart when it gets cold. It's not like the frame is worth a lot, so there's no reason not to modify it to be exactly what you need.

    If you're not comfortable with epoxy and fillers, you should experiment first.
    • CommentAuthorLegislator
    • CommentTimeMar 10th 2010 edited
     
    I have standard slotted cable stops in my basement that have a 5mm x .8 threaded post on them that are about 8-10mm long. If you got rivnuts installed on either end of your top tube you could just thread them in, and bam! you're done, instant brake with minimal housing and stops that are not terribly ugly, though not really stock either. Plus no funny glue or torches effing up your paint. Most LBS's have rivnuts and the tool around so that they can repair braze-ons that get screwed up, and the benefit to doing it like that is that it is a mechanical fastening method that is internally braced and you would be you could put the stops wherever you wanted to on the tube, underneath, left side, right side, cable making some ridiculous angle. Epoxy might work for housing guides but I don't know that I would trust it as a housing stop, which endures a fair amount of force.

    There are multiple tools used to install rivnuts but the basic principle is that it attatches like an internal rivet, but leaves you with a threaded hole. Here is a neat pic for those who don't know:



    There is more than one way to skin a cat, but holler at me if you want to go this route and your LBS doesn't have the stops I have and I will just send you some, as I have more than I'll ever use.
  7.  
    That's really nifty. I've always wondered how they got those in there.
    • CommentAuthorSkidMark
    • CommentTimeMar 15th 2010 edited
     
    Seems to me that if you put a cylindrical spacer in between the bolt and the insert, cranking the bolt down would secure the rivnut. Another trade name for these is nutsert, I've used either m8 or m10 ones to install a spare tire mount on the front of my VW bus.
 
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